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Full text of "Leading industries of the principal places in Union, Fayette, Rush and Shelby Counties, Indiana : with a review of their manufacturing, mercantile and general business interests, advantageous location, &c, including a brief historical and statistical sketch of their rise and progress"

GC MX. 

977.2 

L46 

1792716 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENHALOGY COLLECTJON 



3 1833 02405 7512 






Part '^I— I^esources and Industries of Indiana. 



Reading Industries 

OF THE PRTiWIPAL PLACES IN 

umcii^jpayette, Rusl^ and Shelby 

COUNTIES, INDIANA. 



-wi-x-h: 



RBVIEI'V OF THEIR UANUFJCTURiNG. MERCAN- 

TILE |] GENERAL BC-'SINESS INTERESTS, 

ADVANTAGEOUS LOCATION. &c. 



INCLUDING A BRIEF HISTORICAL AND STATISTICAL SKETCH OF 



THEIR I\ISE AND PROGRESS. 



H 



1884. 

PUBLIC u?-?<.^ja 

Ruihvilie, iridi,;fsa 



1792716 



PREFACE. 



In placing this work before the public we desire to express our purpose fully and clearly, 
viz: to publish such portions of the section's history as will be most useful in tracing its growth 
and development, and to so identify the manufacturers and merchants here located with its pres- 
ent condition, that the outside world may Ibrm a proper estimate of its importance as a point of 
manufacture and distribution. In detailing so fully the extent and operation of each establish- 
ment here noted, our design is that they may serve as illustrations of all that is claimed for this 
part of the State. That the industries operated here to-day, whether large or small, attest fully 
the advantages held out by this favored section, none can gainsay, and that many of the most 
proininent ones owe a fair measure of their success to the excellent facilities aflbrdcd them of 
all kinds, is beyond question. 

Located as this portion of the state of Indiana is, about midway between the densely 
populated sections of the country, with prompt and rapi<l railway communication in all direc- 
tions, it presents attractions for the investment of capital which equal, if they do not surpass, 
those of any other community in the Union. 

We do not believe, that one single manufactory in our whole selection has been over-esti- 
mated, nor have we relied upon heresay or taken a cursory glance over the field; our work has 
been carefully done and much time and labor expended by our staf}" in securing details from 
those in charge of all establishments noted, and should any branch of industry appear to receive 
less prominence than deserved it must be remembered that our enterprise was from its very 
nature co-operative, requiring as it did public approval and support; and the fault cannot be 
justly placed to our account. We are none the less convinced however, that taken as a whole, 
no single work on this place, ever issued, has contained so much new and valuable inlbrmalion, 
or so entirely supplied an existing want. 

Many things combine to make this an attractive location, but as they will become apparent 
from a glance over these pages, we omit mention of them here. We have been aided in our 
undertaking by the many who kindly gave the information asked, and to whom we extend 
our thanks. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



;>r\'^^f>Tr 



Index. 



LIBERXY. 



Ballinger, S., . . . 

Bates, A 

Beaver, U., . . . 
Bertch &• Wilion, . 
Bowers, W., . . . 
Brown, Mrs. L. L. & 

B-jan, S. 

Cooper, N 

Coughlin & Gleason, 
Crist & Levitson, . 

Cully, L. P 

Dunbar, D., . . 

Dnvall & Bowlan, . 
Farlow, G., ... 
Fosiiick i^i Co., . . 

Frankel, J 

Frecjinan, A., . . . 
Fretman i: Sons, . 
Harvev,J., . . . 
Hughes, C, . . ■ 
Jones iS: Freeman, . 
Kennedy, 1.., . . • 
Landis.'j., . . . 
McFaddcn, J., . . 

Morgan, J 

Murphev .V Brvson, 
Peters, II. & Co., . 
Pierce & Beard, . . 
Pierson, B., . . . 
Pierson, E. B. & Co., 
Richards .V Butler, 
Ross & Fosdick, 
Rude Bros. MTg, 

Ryan, P 

Snyder A: Templeton 
Union County Nati 

Bank, . ■ . . 
Watt, Edward F., . 
Walton, J., ... 



Co 



CO I»{ IS KRSTI LLE 



Ackerman, C. C, 
Andrews, A. M., 
Bailey, J. L., . . 
Balle, Geo. & Son, 
Banes, H. G., 
Barrows & Co., . 
Beck, Wm. H., . 
Brown, G., 
Buckley House, 
Burk (i: Morris, 
Cain, W. J., . . 
Citizen's Bank, . 
Cook, C, . . . 
Cooley, A. C, . 
Cooley — Morrison 
ture Co., . . 
Connersyille Bugg 



Co 



Connersvillc Furniture 

Mfg. Co., . 
Connersyille Hydraul 

Mills, . . . 
Connersvillc Pearl Ho 

inv Co., . . . 
Dale, W. T. & Co., 
Devor, Win., . . 
Dickey cV Co., . . 
Downs, Ready li Co 
Eliason, H. C, . . 
Ellis lV McFarlan, . 
Ellis & Serodino, 
First National Bunk, 
Frankel, M., . . 
Galbraith, W. .'v: Co., 

Gentry, J 

Gipe, F., .... 
Goodnion, Jaroh, . 
Grand Hotel, . . 
GrilKs, T. L., . . 
GritlKh \- Co., . . 
Heeb. (jeorge, . . 
Heeb, Wni., . . . 

Heron, J M. iV Co., 

HoUberg .V Co., . 

Huston ilouse, . . 

Indiana Furniture M 

Co., 

Joseph, Phil., . . . 

Kehl, Anthony, 

Keller A: Co., ' . . 

Keller & Uhle, . . 

Kelliim, J. M., . . 

Kribs, Jacob, . . . 

Kublcr, Joseph, . . 

Leonard, Morrison & 

Loeper, Geo. & Son, 

Ludwick & Taylor, 

McCann, James, 

McFarlan Carriage Co, 

Maffett, T., . . 

Meyer, Martin, 

Michael, W. W., 

Mills, J., . . . 

Millikin, W. H., 

Morrow, A., . . . 

Mulheeren, J., . . 

Munk & Roberts Furn 
Co 

Murphy Bros., . . 

O'Toole, M. H., . 

Parker & Co., . . 

Peters, John J., . . 

Pratt, G. S, '. . . 

Rawls, Dr. D. ,v: Co., 

Ready, W., . . . 

Rieman, Henry, 

Roots, P. H. & F. M., 



Co 



Rothermel, A., . . 
Schoenholtz, Adam, 
Schoenholtz, F., . . 
Shaeler, J., . . ; 
Shaw, Thouias. . . 
Shera \- Mclnlosh, 
Snider cVPfaolllin, . 
Stcw.-irt, Geo. K., . 
Tatnian i-S; Cooley, . 
Thomas, T. F., . . 
Turkenkoph Bros., 
Updegraph, M., . . 
Western Hosiery Mill 

Wood, G 

Wood, John H., . . 
Woolsev, INT., . . . 
Young,' I C., . . 

F A VICTTEV lIvI-1 

George, Joseph iS: .Son, 
Hunt, L. S., .... 

Moor, C. E, 

Tuttle, Samuel, . . . 

FAIKVIJC'W. 

Gibbs, W. W., . . . 
Higley, Wm., . , . 

BtUSHVII-I,!;. 

Abercrombio, I'iieodore, 
Alexander, A. P., . . 
Allen & Co., .... 
Bakemeyer, H., . . . 
Barnard A; Flenner, 
Barnes, J. T., . . . 

Heher, E 

Hioomer, J., . . . . 
Bliss iV Wilson, . . . 
Bodine, V. B. ij Son, 

Boyd, J. C 

Bu'el i: Reed, . . . 
Carmichael, J., . . 
Carnine, [.,.... 

Carr, W."W., . . . 
ChurchilKV Bush, . . 
City Bakery and Restau 
rant, ...... 

City Boot and Shoe Shop 
City Mills, . . . 
Cline JC PIdugh, . 
Cox it Pugh, 
C Spring Cart Co., 

Davis, M 

Dollker, C 

Egan & Son, . . . 
Everett & Ferguson, 
Fairley, J. P., . . 
Finley, )oseph L., . 
Fitzgerald, P., . . 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/leadingindustrieOOnp 



tNDEX. 



Cummins, ].,... 


117 


Dewitt, F., . . . . 


u7 


Doble .'V UePrez, . . 


117 


Dull, Mrs. C 


• "7 


Dunn, George H., 


116 


Elliott, \V., .... 


■ "7 


Enos, j. tl 


• ".S 


First National IJank, 


lo^ 


Fiaitz, F 


117 


Flaitz & Maple, . . 


117 


Flo>d, Dr. R. M., . 


I ij 


Fortune, T., .... 


117 


Frechtlin^ i: Morner, 


I Is 


Glab, FranU, . . . 


117 


Goodrich, G. A., . . 


"4 


Gor£;as & Serong, 


■ "7 


Gouldin;;, Cieorge M., 


no 


Grifley, J. n. k Co., . 


1 11 


Grovcr, W 


"7 


Hand, Oscar, . . . 


116 


Ilardebeck, John B., 


"3 


Hawkins, J., ... 


117 


Haymoiui, G., . . . 


117 


Haymand, J. K., . . 


117 


Higgins, J 


■ 117 


Horst, F. 


117 


Horst \' Co., .... 


117 


Jones, Renjamin, . . 


Jii 


Joseph, J . . . . 


1 17 


h-armire. Major 0: !!ro\v 


n, 10^ 


Kennedy X Brown, . 


117 


Kenned V, F 


117 


Kennedy & Major, . 


108 


Kirks, G„ .... 


117 


Laughlin & Co., . . 


117 


Levison.Mrs., J. . . 


"7 


Little & Miekel, . . 


"7 


McCrca iV Bishop, . 


117 


McGuire, J. H., . . 


"4 


Morris, .S. B, , . . 


105 


Morrison & Deprez, . 


1 17 


Morrison, rniTief^, Jr., 


114 


Murdoch, M. G., . . 


no 


Naeff, D., 


117 



Neighbor, C 117 

Parrisli i^: Milleson, . . 106 

Parrish, \V 117 

Pedclicord, John II., . . loy 

Randall, J. M. i: .Son, . 113 

Ray House 117 

Raymond, A 117 

Robins .i: Powell, . . 117 

Roth, Frank 115 

Sch;)rtmeier, H. E., . . ni 

Schott, Joseph, . . . in 

.Shelbv Bank, .... 107 

.Shelby Machine W'ks . loS 
Shelbyville Planing Mills, 109 

.Sheldon, F., 117 

Shclk, J., 117 

.Sindlinger, Phillip F., . loS 

Small, W n7 

.Snuder, N., 117 

Stephan, F., 117 

Talbcrt, Frank, . . . in 

Thacher, George C, . 109 

Vance, Hunter & Co., 117 

Varnov, |., 117 

Vaughn, "W., . . . . 117 

Walker, James D., . . no 

Wilson, JJavid B. iV Son, 113 

Wood, C, 117 

MOKKISXOW?*. 

Binlbrd, J. L., .... 120 

Davis, J., 123 

Handv Bros., .... 119 

Hart, "J 123 

Hittle \' Hudgins, . . 123 

Huttinan ti (jraham, . 120 

Johnson, I. N., .... 121 

Morrison A: Co., . . . 123 

Mvers, M. ii Co., . . . 121 

Roberts, J. W., . . . 119 

Rodgers, Mrs. C, . . 123 

Riglesbcrger, F., . . . 121 

Salisbury, S., .... 121 

Smiley, J., 123 



Spurrier, George A., . 


. 122 


The New York Store, 


n,S 


Tvner, James M. i: Co 


, )20 


Wilson iV- Son, . . . 


• 1-3 


Williams, C.T., . . 


. 122 


Wolf, I. G., . . . . 


122 


Wrennick, T 


122 


Youngs, S. VV. . . . 


. 122 


■WAi.nitois. 




Alley, J. S 


• '24 


Archev & Cage, . . 


124 


Cain, J., 


. 126 


Chapman iV Larimore, 


126 


Cummins House . . 


i-."; 


DrummorKl, H., . . 


'-.S 


Grul.b, David, . . . 


l^.S 


Hayniond \' Son, . . 


T26 


Powell A: Fraster, . 


126 


Sparks, Jeroine, . . 


i2<; 


Stroup, S P., . . - 


126 


Thompson, D. . . . 


126 


Vanpelt .V Kechev, . 


126 


Washburn, U 


126 


i»i 1 i»i»i,i;xo wr«. 


Custer, [ 


128 


Donncl.T. N. & Son. 


1-7 


Miller, T 


12S 


Morris, Isaac G., . . 


127 


Weintrout, Nicholas, 


127 


Youngman, J., . . 


15S 


KAIRI..A3SD. 




Culberlton. Mrs., . . 


12S 


Fearv, Mrs 


128 


Holmes & Co., . . . 


128 


Neal & Reese, . . . 


128 


Parkhurst \' Gephart, 


12S 


Ply mate, J. B., . . 


128 


Smith & Bros., . . 


128 


Smith, H 


128 


Steuart, W., . . . 


1 28 


Wright, C, 


12S 



UNION COUNTY, 



The eastern part of this county is level, 
the west undulating or hilly. About one- 
eighth is bottom land, the other seven 
eighths is timbered upland, originally 
covered with valuable timber. The soil 
is uniformly good and well adapted to 
corn, wheat, oats, grass, etc. Hogs, sheep, 
and cattle are raised witii profit. 

The county first began to be settled in 
1804 when this section was embraced 
within what was then known as Dearborn 
County, Territory of Indiana, whose seat 
of Justice was Lawrenceburg, on the Ohio 
River. The first .settlers were principally 
a number of persons from South Carolina, 
who formed what was known a.s the "Car- 
olina Colony," among whom were the fol- 
lowing: Robert Hanua, Sr.; John Tem- 
pleton; George Leviston; William Ho- 
gan; John Hanna; Robert Templeton, Sr.; 
John Logan; Joseph Hanna; JohnEwing 
and Robert Swann. The county was or- 
ganized about 1S'21. The county seat was 
first located at Brownsville, in accordance 
with an act of the Legislature, December 
31, 1821, but the location did not take 
place until February, 1822. The first 
Court House and jail were also built in 
that yeai-. The first County Commision- 
ers were Thomas Cully, Aaron Stanton 
and Jonathan Hunt ; Associate Judge, 
Robert Swann; Probate Judge, Hen- 
ry C. Hammond; Sheriff, William 
Youse; Clerk of Court*, Jamas Leviston; 



Recorder, Thomas Cason ; Treasurer, John 
Hanna; Surveyor, Thomas Brown. 

Union County contains 170 square miles 
and is divided into six townships: Browns- 
ville, Center, Liberty, Harmony, Harri- 
son and Union. In 1880 the population 
was 7,673 but this has been increased 
since that time. The county is well wa- 
tered and the Cincinnati, Hamilton and 
Indianapolis Railroiulpa-sses through near 
its center, from east to west. Though 
one of the smallest counties in size it is by 
no means least in importance, having a 
property valuation of over §10,000,000 
and comparatively no debt. 

Union County is bounded on the north 
by Wayne County, on the east by the 
State of Ohio, on the south by Franklin 
County and on the west by Fayette Coun- 
ty. As to the value of its lands for agri- 
cultural purposes, they are unsurpassed; 
and we venture to say that there is no 
section of the state to-day which offers 
better inducements for either the farmers 
or manufacturers to locate than does this 
county, either in the prospective rise in 
values, present prices of lands, its timber 
supply, its agricultural richness, its prox- 
imity to markets or its shipping facilities. 
Like most of the counties through here it 
has an extended system of gravel roads 
which radiate through every part of the 
county of great importance to the gener- 
al trade. 



Liberty. 



Liberty the county seat of Union 
County ,i.s a thriving point \vell located on 
the Cincinnati, Hamilton and Indianapo- 
lis Railroad. 

The land ou which it is located was 
bought of the government in 1813, by 
Wright Cook, and the town surveyed in 
April, 1822, by Thomas Brown. Liberty 
was incorporated in 183G, at which time 
the following trustees were elected: Ward 
No. 1, Wilsons Bragg; Xo. 2, Tliomas 
Morrow; No. 3, David A. Cox; No. 4, 
John Anderson; No. 5, Thomas Carr. 
Thomas Hill is said to have been the first 
hatter, Archibald Estcy kept the first ho- 
tel or tavern. Isaac Cooms was an early 
cabinet maker. 

At the present time we find the citizens 
of Liberty fully alive to the necessities of 



the hour. The people of Indiana have for 
some time recognized the vital necessity 
of education and the different sections are 
striving with each other to approach 
as near perfection as possible. Liberty is 
not behind any place of its class in the 
state and could set a good example for 
some larger cities to follow. In 1875 a 
fine, large school building was erected at 
a cost (jf §12,000. The church going ele- 
ment is also well represented, tliere being 
Methodist Episcopal, Presbyterian and 
Catholic churches here. The population 
in 1880 was 1,096 while at the present 
time it is nearer 1,300. We give a list of 
the leading business concerns here and 
their lines of trade, a perusal of which 
will give the reader a more correct idea 
of the importiince of the place. 



UNION COUNTY NATIONAL BANK. 

The popular .niid substantial financial anil fi- 
duciary institution known as the Union Coun- 
ty National Bank, the only one in the citv of 
Liberty, was originally cstalilishcd as a private 
Bank in 1S70 and re-ors;anized as a National 
Bank under the United States Banking Laws 
with a capital'stotk of;p5o,ocK) which has since 
remained unchanged. The bank buildin},' is a 
substantial two-story structure 22x60 feet in 
dimensions with a line fire and burghir proof 
vault designed by and constructed under the 
direction of i:)r. A. II. CainpbelJ one of the 
Board of Directors who is also a Civil Engin- 
eer.by profession. This institution conducts a 
general banking business in loans, discounts 
and collections on all points and has a large 
line of deposits. It has correspondents in all 
the principal cities of the Union and issues 
drai'ts on Eastern and Western points. The of- i 
ficers of the bank as_at present organized are I 
J. E. Morris, President; Ilenrv Shriver, Vice 
President; II. Husted, Cashier; A. E. John- 
Bon, Ass't. Cashier, and a hoard of directors ' 
composed of the foilowing well known and \ 



prominent citizens ; J. E. Morris, W. M. Clark, 
James Smith, J. C. Kitchel, Z. Stanley, Henry 
Shriver, and Dr. A. II. Campbell. Mr. Huste'd 
who so acceptably fills the responsible position 
of Casliicr has been repeatedly elected to po- 
sitions of trust in tiiis countv. Mr. \V. M. 
Clark a member of the board of directors served 
a County Treasurer during the war. The 
members of the board are gentlemen and fa- 
vorably known not only in this citv but through- 
out the county and this section of the state and 
under their judicious and conservative man- 
agenient of aflairs connected with its financial 
interests the bank has attained a favorable rep- 
utation and prominent rank as one of cur 
soundest and most substantial institutions of 
its class. 



ED. F. WALT, 

Bakery and Confectionerv. 

Under the designating title of the "O.K. 
Bakery," Mr. Ed. F. Walt established hisp.-es- 
ent place of business, in May, 1SS3, where he 
conducts a general bakery business, and car- 
ries in stock a desirable and choice assortment 



14 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



of fine confectionery from the leadin? manu- 
factories, and of his own make, togpether with 
a choice variety of fancy cake^^, pie=, family 
bread, roll?, crackers, etc. The prernises occu- 
pied are 34x60 feet in dimensions, and the 
salesroom presents a neat and attractive 
appearance ; while the bakery proper is a model 
of neatness. He employs from two to four 
assistants, according to the exiijencies of trade, 
and is prepared to execute promptly all orders 
for any description of goods in his line. He 
makes a prominent specialty of supplying 
families with choice bread. cak'?s, pies, etc., 
and of furnishing for weddings, festivals and 
public occasions, ornamental cakes of every 
description at the most reasonable rates. Mr. 
Walt, who is a thoroughly practical baker and 
confectioner of m.-^ny years experience, is a 
native of Franklin County, Penn'n., where he 
was born in 1S49. He has resided in this city 
since May, 1SS3. previous to which time he 
was engaged in t!ie same line of business at 
Greenfield. Indiana, from which place he re- 
moved to Liberty. 

E. B. PIERSOX Jv: CO., 
Druggists. Union St. 
While it is true that the people of the Uni- 
ted States make a more liberal and intelligent 
use of drugs and meciicines than those of any 
other civilized nation, it is equally susceptible 
of demonstr.ntion that in no other country do 
the dispensers of these articles possess such 
a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of 
the nature and properties of the various com- 
pounds and ingredients emploved in the prep- 
aration of physician's prescriptions for the nu- 
merous "ills which human flesh is heir to." 
The pharmacist ot the present age, in order to 
successfully conduct his business must po-scss 
a practical and theoretical knowledge of the 
principles of chemistry, botany and ■•iiiaterin 
mejica" and be able not only tn accurately pre- 
pare the remedies prescribed, but to detect er- 
rors which sometimes in.idvertently occur. In 
preparing a statistical review of the industries 
and commercial enterprises of Union Countv. 
it is therefore eminently appropriate that a 
liberal amount of space should be accorded to 
the representative establishments engaged in 
this important department of commercial en- 
terprise, among which mav be mentioned in 



I this connection the popular and reliable phar- 
I inacy of Messrs. E. B. Pierson i: Co., centrally 

• and eligibly located on Union .St. in the City 
I of Liberty where in a sales room 18x91 feet in 
' dimensions tastefully arranged and fitted up in 
; modern style may at all times be found a 

• choice selection and desirable stock of the 

• purest drugs and medicines, proprietary reme- 
! dies, ph.irmaceulical preparations, paints, oils, 
j dye-stuffs, soaps, sponges, toilet articles, sta- 
I tionery, perfumeries and druggist's sundries in 
I great variety. In the prescription dcp;irtment 
I special attention is devoted to the preparation 
; of physician's prescriptions and family recipes 

by com|>ctent and experitnced chemists and 
pharmacists of acknowledged abilitvand skill, 
and no pains are spared to secure the purest 
and best articles in this line. Mr. E. B. Pier- 
son is a native of this citv and was born in iS^o. 
He is practically conversant with all the de- 
tails of the business in w hich he is engaged 
and is ablv as.sisted in the manageinent there- 
of by an experienced and competent clerk. His 
partner in the bu-!ness is his liniher Mr. D. S. 
Pierson who is a ii.itive of Ohio and conducts 
a merchant tailoring and gentlemen's furnish- 
ing goods establishment in this city. 



I Among the more important firms doing 
business here, besides tiiose alreativ men- 
I tinned, are the following: Rude Bros. 
\ Man'f 'g. Co., agricultural inipiemenls; L. P. 
I Cully, dry goods; W. Bowers, stationery; H. 
! Peters A: Co., stoves and tinware; C. Hughes, 
j grocer; Freeman & Sons, lumber; J. Harvey, 
hotel; G. Farlow. .-.toves and tinware; Jones ,\: 
I Freeman, wagons, etc.; J.Walton, boots and 
I shoes; Crist ..V Levitson, hardware; Fosdick & 
I Co., furniture; S. Hyram, hotel; Coughiin ,.*c 
I Gleason, milHnerv ; Mrs. L. L. A: A. Brown, 
I dry goods; Duvall iS: Bowlan, millinerv ; A. 
i Bates, insurance; B. Pierson, trJior ; Murphv 
i: Bryson, grfKeries: J. Morixaii. livery; L. 
Kennedy, tailor; Richards iV Butler, flouring 
mills; Snyder iV Templrton, dry goods; J. 
' Landis. jeweler; J. McFadden. photographer; 
S Dallinger, dry goods; D. Dunbar, real es- 
tate; Pierce A: Heard, meats; D. Beaver, drugs ; 
J. Frankel, dry goods; N. Cooper, drugs; Ross 
. A: Fosdick, grocers; Bertch A: Wilson, hard- 
ware; A. Freeman, liverv; P. Ryan, grocer. 



FAYETTE COUNTY, 



Broken into by the sturdy Pioneer, fol- 
lowing the gradually receding footsteps 
of the reil man, we notice among those 
who came here to plant civilization amidst 
the wilderness and pathless i'orests.thc fol- 
lowing early settlers: 

Betsy Fraizer and family are known as 
the first persons in the county; early 
came, John McCormac, Basil Roberts, 
Harrold New land, John Tyner, John 
Conner, Newton Claypool, Nicholas Itea- 
gan, Adolph Morgan, John M. Wilson 
and others. 

The county of Fayette, was originally 
erected by the Legislature of the State 
Dec. 28, 1818, to take effect January 1st, 
1819. Commissioners consisting of non- 
residents, were appointed to locate the 
county seat. They met at the house of 
John McCormac, north of the present 
City of Conuersville, February 8, 1819,at 
which time they decided upon the loca- 
tion of the seat of Justice at Connersville, 
but that all courts were to be held at the 
house of Mr. McCormac, until the erec- 
tion of county buildings. 

The "Land Purchase" embracing a 
large portion of this and other counties of 
this section of the state, was acquired 
by treaty Dec. 9, 1809, and surveyed in 
1810, coming into market in 1811. Sales 
of land were effected at Cincinnati, ()., 
until theestablishment of a Land Office at 
Brookville, Franklin County. The eiuly 
settlers were largely from Ohio, although 
Kentucky, North Carolina, Virginia, 



Pennsylvania and New York States con- 
tributed to the number. 

CHUKCIIKS. 

It was not long in these days after the 
opening up of the forests and the increase 
in the settlements until the forests were 
made to echo the voice of the "Preacher" 
of the Gospel. As early as 1814 the Bap- 
tist danomination etsablished a church 
both at Bethel and at Lick Creek, the first 
preacher being James Tyner. The Chris- 
tian Church at Fayetteville Vv-as establish- 
ed July 4, 1 824,and at Connersville 1887. 

The M. Vj. Church was organized at 
what is now Connersville, as early as 1816 
or 1818 and near Bentonville in 1823. 

The Presbyterian Church was organiz- 
ed at Connersville in 1824, by Rev. Dan- 
iel Hayden, while the Catholic Church 
was not organized until 1844. 

The first Commissioners were Basil 
Roberts, Harrold Newland and John Ty- 
ner, and the first court was held by them 
February ; th, the first election having 
been held about the first of the same 
month 1819. The county was divided in- 
to five townships, viz: Columbia, Conners- 
ville, Brownsville, Harrison and Jennings. 
There were at this time 1 153 white male 
voters. The First Judicial Court was 
held May 3, 1819, John Watts being the 
presiding Judge. At this time, the fol- 
lowing Attorneys were admitted to prac- 
tice. W. ^\'. Wick, John List, W, C. 
Drew, James Noble, D. L Caldwell, J as. 
B. Ray, James Rearidon, Nathan Frenc'^ 



16 



STATE OF INDIAXA. 



and Jonn Alexander. The First Treas- 
urer of the County (by appointment) was 
Newton Claypool. The County Agent 
was N. Reagan, Adolph Morgan was the 
first assessor and John W. Wikon first 
sheriff. 

Total acreage of the county is 1.31,000 
and the lands were nearly all entered 
previous to the end of 1819. 

Among tliose early engaged in Com- 
mercial pursuits, I\Ir. Conner was the first. 
He establislied his .'^tore or Indian trading 
post, as early as 1810. Mr. Conner was a 
member of the first Constitutional Con- 
vention. He was one of the Comniison- 
ers to locate the State Capital and was the 
first Senator of the new county. Among 
the earlier business men of the county 
were Joshua Havlan, Kobt. and ileredith 
Helm, David Hawkins, Geo. Frybarger, 
Robt. Griflis and A. B. Cornell. Tiie first 
county jail was built by Jonathan John, 
and accepted Sept. 4, 1811). It occupied 
the site of tlie present Town Hall; was 
16x30 feet in dimensions. The first Court 
House was built soon after; it was of hewn 
logs, two stories 20x20. The present Court 
House was erected in 1848, at a cost of 
$20,000, a marvel of economy. It is of 
fine architectural ajipearance two stories 
high with spacious court room, offices and 
jury room. The White Water Valley 
Canal w;is completed through the county 
in 1845, which gave a great irapetius to 
agricultural, manufacturing and commer- 
cial operations at various points along its 
line, and great hopes of a prosperous fu- 
ture. The sad havoc which the floods oc- 



casioned and the subsequent Intj-oduction 
of railroads into the county, finallv led 
to the abandonment of the Canal for nav- 
igation purposes and the waters were cou- 
sti'ucted into the most powerful system of 
Hydraulic works to be found in the 
Union. The facilities olfered by these 
works in tliis and other counties arc un- 
surpassed by any for manufacturing pur- 
poses. Fayette County is bounded on tlie 
cast by Wayne and Union, south by 
Franklin, west by Rush, and north, by 
Henry and Wayne Counties. Tlie Town- 
ships of the County are as folk)WS, with 
the dates of their organization: — Water- 
loo, February 13, 1821; Jackson, Aug. 14, 
1820; Jennings,February 9, lf<19; Orange, 
February 11, 1822; Fairview,i)ec, 4, 18.') I ; 
Harrison, February 9, 1819; Posey, Feij- 
ruary 10, 1823; l-'onnersville, February, 
9, l!<19. The chief villages, outside 
of the count}' seat, are. Glen wood, Fal- 
mouth, Bentonville, Fayetlevillc. Water- 
loo, Acquina, Everton, Fairview and 
Columbia. The county possesses some of 
the finest agricultural land in the state, it 
is well watered by the White AVater A'^al- 
ley River and various tributaries, and al- 
though some portions are quite hilly, it 
only presents the more handsome build- 
ing sites which are so often to be found 
adorned with costly and handsome private 
residences. As a manufacturing and bu- 
siness center it preseuts strong induce- 
ments, in its facilities for supplies, in its 
superior water-power and admirable sys- 
tem of railroad intercommunication. 



City of CoimersYille. 



Connersvillc the county seat of Fayette 
County, was laid out in 1813 by John 
■Connor, one of the earlier settlers here, an 
Indian trader and an influential man with 
the whites and Indians. He was also one 
•of the Commissioners ajipointed in 1820 
to select and locate a quantity of land not 
exceeding four sections, as a site for the 
permanent location of the state govern- 
ment buildings; a site being selected on 
June 7th, and on Jan. (ith, 1821, the 
State Legislature declared that the new 
seat of government should be called In- 
dianapolis; the business of the state being 
conducted however,"at Corydon, Harrison 
County, until January 10th, 1825. 

ADVANTAGEOUS LOCATION. 

Connersville is elegibly situated on the 
old White Water Valley Railway, di- 
verging north and soutli, and on the Cin- 
cinnati, Hamilton it Indianapolis Rail- 
way running east and west, and the Ft. 
Wayne, Muucie & Cincinnati Railway 
running north, being located about half 
"way between Indianapolis and Cincin- 
nati. It is beautifully situated on an ele- 
vated plateau, surrounded by hills with 
rich clay soils, thickly settled and well 
improved. From the heights surround- 
ing a fine view of the city and valley is 
obtained. Connersville is an important 
manufacturing center, good water power 
being obtiiinable from tlie Connersville 
Hydraulic fformerly White Water Canal) 
Some of the most extensive and import- 
ant manufacturing establisliments of the 
state are located here. As a manufactur- 



ing center this place presents many ad- 
vantages, among which may be briefly 
mentioned its abundant water power, its 
geographical position, its railroad facili- 
ties, its abundant cheap labor and its heal- 
thy and steady growth of wealth and 
population; and must inevitably lead to a 
much more rapid growth in the near fu- 
ture. At the present time fl884) the 
value of the combined products of the 
manufacturing coucerns exceed 81,000,- 
000, furnishing employment to about 
1000 hands. Among the various estab- 
lishments (a brief history of the principal 
ones being found in the pages which fol- 
low) are those manufacturing hosiery, 
forge and blast blowers, furniture, flour 
and hominy, carriages, planing mill work, 
foundry and machine work, etc., while 
there are two good banks. 

SICHOOLS AND CHURCHES. 

The city has an excellent graded school 
system with an average attendance of 
600 scholars. There are also seven church 
congregations including a Presbyterian, 
Christian, Episcopal, 2 Methodist, Catho- 
lic, German Reformed, and Colored. 

WATER WORKS. 

Connersville has one of the most com- 
plete systems of water works in the state. 
It was completed in January, 1870, by the 
Holly Manufacturing Co., Ijockport, N. 
Y., at a cost of 847,000, including about 
3A miles of iron mains and 41 double tire 
hydrants, all of sufficient size to supjdy 
any demand likely to be made upon the 
works. A pressure of from 20 to 25 V \ 



18 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



is always kept on the mains, which can 
be increased to 100 lbs. in case of iire, the 
works having been erected with an espe- 
cial view to the protection of property in 
case of fire. The machinery is situated 
about a mile from the center of the city, is 
propelled by water power obtained from 
the Connersville Hydraulic, and the cost 
of running does not exceed §800 yearly. 
The city also, has a well conducted 

FIRE DEPARTME>-T, 

consisting of three hose companies and a 
hook and ladder company, composed of 
12 men each, carrying 1,200 feet of hose. 
From three to six streams can be brought 
to bear upon any tire likely to occur in 
the city, while with additional hose 10 
streams may be thrown. There is suffi- 
cient force under lire pressure to throw a 
stream through a one inch nozzle, 125 feet 
high. 

GAS WOKKS. 

A stock company to furnish gas was 
organized in 1875, with a capital of 830,- 



000 which has been increased to S50,00O 
The present officers are L. Mcintosh, 
president; A. .M. Sinks, secretary; and A. 
M. Huston, treasurer. The number of 
private consumers is about 300. 

THE PRESS 

is represented by two good weekly papers 
which receive a well deserved support. 
Thq Connersville Times, a 6 col. quarto, 
had its inception as the White Water Val- 
ley Times in 1828, its present name being 
adopted in 1850. A. M. Sinks and J. C. 
Ochiltree are editors and proprietors. 

The Cuniifrsville Examiner is a folio in 
form and was established 16 years ago by 
J. M. Higgs, present editor and proprietor. 

Taken altogether, Connersville is one 
of the best towns of its class in the state, 
and a perusal of the histories of the lead- 
ing business houses, in the pages which 
follow, wiU lead to much valuable infor- 
mation with reference to the advantages 
of this city as a market for the purchase 
of supplies. 



WESTERN HOSIERY MILLS, 

Seamless and Cut Hosiery, etc. 
In numerous departments of productive in- 
dustry, "western enterprise lias of late succeeded 
in wresting Irom eastern monopolists the 
supremacy they once enjoyed, and in place of 
New England and Philadelphia supplying the 
markets of the South and West with textile 
fabrics, knit goods and articles of a similar 
character, the tables have been turned, and 
to-day the State of Indiana, instead ol sending 
its raw materials "a thousand miles to mill" 
and paying double freights and profits on the 
manufactured article, is enabled to compete 
successfully \Mth the factories of the East, and 
even to ship its products to the sea-board cities 
and trade-centres I'rom which it was formerly 
compelled to draw its supplies. Among the 
most prominent of the industrial enterprises 
of this great State which has been conspicu- 
ously instrumental in bringing about this im- 
portant result is the Western Hosiery Mills, 
of Connersville, which is the outgrowth of a 
private enterprise which was inaugurated in 
this city upon a comp.nrativelv small scale in 
1872 by >lessrs. Leonard Bros., who were 
succeeded by Chenncworth & Ralph. In 
October, 1SS3, the present company was or- 
ganized and incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Indiana with a capital stock of $10,- 



000. Numerous additions and improvements 
were at once made, new and improved styles 
of special machinery introduced, and the pro- 
ductive capacity of the works doubled. In 
addition to all the latest designs of machinery 
in use at similar establishments, this company 
employs many valuable and important im- 
provements, the invention of Mr. W. H. Cas- 
well, one of the stock-holders and general 
superintendent of the mills, which are con- 
trolled exclusively by this company and in use 
by no other mills in the country. The ground 
space occupied by this company covers an 
area of about one acre, upon which is erected 
a commodious and substantial four-story brick 
building 33x85 feet in dimensions. The mo- 
tive power for the machinery employed is 
furnished by one steam engine and boiler, and 
from eighty to one hundred operatives are em- 
ployed. The capital stock of the company has 
recently been increased to $2^,000, and the 
mills which are among the best and most 
thoroughly equipped hosiery mills in the 
United States, also rank among the most im- 
portant in the valuation of their products, 
which will at the present time exceed $75,000 
per annum. The works have a capacity for 
turning out two hundred dozen hosiery per 
day, and the products of the company, con- 
sisting of both seamless and cut-hosiery, mit- 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



19 



tens, etc_ find a readv sale m all sections ot the 
Union. Tiie officers of the company, as at 
present orsjanized, are: J. X. Huston, presi- 
dent^ MeKin Ellis, secretary; A. J.Ralph, 
manager, and W. H. Caswell, superintendent. 
To the enterprise, public spirit and ability of 
the president of this company, the city ot Con- 
nersville is largely indebted for the promi- 
nence it has attained as a prosperous and 
progressive manufacturing centre. Not only 
in connection with the company has his in- 
fluence been felt, but he has ever been fore- 
most in promoting and advancing all legiti- 
mate enterprises having for their aim and 
object the general welfare and commercial and 
industrial thrift of the community. Mr. J. N. 
Huston (a son of Mr. Wm. Huston, one of 
Connersville's most highly honored and res- 
pected citizens, who died in this city, imiver- 
sally regretted, in 1S75; was born in Franklin 
County, Pennsylvania, May nth, 1S49, and 
came to Indiana with his parents when but 
two years of age. He attended the graded 
schools in this city until reaching his fifteenth 
year, when he entered college at Hanover, 
Indiana, and subsequently attended the Miami 
University at Oxford, Ohio. He began his 
preparation for college in the study of Latin, 
Greek and classical literature with James C. 
Mcintosh, Esq., a well-known attorney of 
Connersville. He also studied medicine in the 
office of Dr. George W. Garver, and attended 
a course of lectures at the Eellevue Medical 
College, New York city, the leading educa- 
tional institution of its class in the Union. On 
his return to this city he entered the ofSce of 
Judge John S. Reed, where he remained until 
tendered a position in tiie Citizen's Bank of 
this city, of which his father was president. In 
a few months he was appointed assistant 
cashier and subsequently cashier. After the 
death of his father he engaged in various in- 
dustrial and commercial enterprises as his fa- 
ther's successor. He is at the present time 
sole owner of the Citizen's Bank, having pur- 
chased the interest held by other partners. He 
is also president of the City Gas Works, and 
that company owes much of its success to his 
efforts and indefatigable exertions in its behalf 
He owns a controlling interest in the stock of 
this company, and is a large stockholder in 
the Indiana Furniture Company. He is the 
president of the Connersville Buggy Com- 
pany. He has recently established a model 
creamery here that bids fair to be the most 
complete establishment of its kind in the 
country. One hundred thorough bred Jersey 
cows yield up their rich treasure to this estab- 
lishment; the present capacity of this new 
industry is 2,500 lbs. of pure fresh butter, pro- 
duced by the most approved scientific methods. 
He is also prominently identified with numer- 
ous other enterprises. In political affairs he 
is a consistent and enthusiastic member of the 
Republican party, in the councils of which he 
is recognized as a leader, and, although not an 
office-seeker in the general acceptance of that 
term, he has been frequently called to positions 



of honor and trust by his fellow citizens. He 
was twice elected lo the City Council from a 
strong Democratic ward, and on October 12th, 
iSSo, Wis chosen to represent his district in 
the State Legislature by a flattering majority 
of 791 votes over his opponent, who was con- 
fessedly the most popular Deniociat in the 
district. He was again re-elected, and is at the 
present time (18S4) the nominee by acclama- 
tion of his party for the State Senate, repre- 
senting the district composed of Fayette, Rush 
and Union counties. And although his 
extensive business interests renders it almost 
impossible to accept the honor, he has yielded 
to the wishes of his friends, and will undoubt- 
edly be triumphantly re-elected. He is an 
extensive real estate owner in this cit^-, and 
conducts a model farm by the assistance of a 
competent superintendent, and is deeplv in- 
terested in the agricultural and horticultural 
development of this county. He was tor sev- 
eral years president of tfie Fayette County 
Agricultural Society, a position which he filled 
to the entire acceptance of the societv, but was 
compelled to decline re-election on account of 
other pressing business engagements. Few 
men in the state have become more widely 
known in public and private life, and few com- 
munities can boast the possession of so suc- 
cessful and energetic a citizen with such 
diversified and important interests so clearly 
defined and so successfully prosecuted. 



P. H. & F. M. ROOTS, 

Force-blast Blowers, etc. 
Among the many important discoveries and 
inventions which have characterized the 
march of industrial progress during the nine- 
teenth century, there are probably none which 
have more completely revolutionized tlie 
methods of the past and exerted a more poten- 
tial influence in a diversity of directions than 
the positive blowers and kindred devices which 
are such indispensable requisites in our manu- 
facturing establishments, our mines, our lum- 
ber interests, our packing houses, and even 
in our telegraph ollices and mercantile houses. 
It is now a recognized fact, not only in this 
country but in foreign lands, that the nearest 
approach to absolute perfection in this direc- 
tion has been reached in the devices now 
manufactured by the representative firm of P. 
H. iz F. M. Roots, of Connersville, Indiana, a 
firm that has for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury been prominently identified with this 
special branch of industry, during which period 
they have been unremitting in their cfibrtsand 
endeavors to bring their products to the high- 
est standard of perfection. With a full prac- 
tical knowledge of the wants and requirements 
of those having occasion to employ blow ers for 
any purpose, they have spent thousands of 
dollars in experimenting and perfecting the 
improved positive blowers which are now con- 
structed on an entirely new principle, being a 
radical change on the former methods of con- 
struction, combining all the advantages and 
good points of the old styles and at the same 



20 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



time eliminatint; every feature which experi- 
ence and careful observation !ia\'e ^ll0^vn to be 
objectionable; retainini; in their construction 
the important elements of simplicitv, durabili- 
ty and thorough eHiciencv. The^e blowers 
are especially adaptetl for service in establi-.h- 
ments where either blast or exhaust is required, 
where the atmosphere is used under ordinarv 
conditions as reijards inoisture or temperature, 
tucli as foundries, stnith-shops, rolling mills, 
steel works, brass works, copper-smiths, blast 
furnaces, gas exhausters, heating furnaces lor 
bolt works, and all khids of forging works; 
exhausting dust froin grinding i"ooms of cut- 
lery work; ventilation of buildings, mines, 
tunnels; for glass works, gunsmiths, snnit 
mills; smelting works for silver, copper and 
lead; supplying blast for furnaces of all kinds, 
and all kinds of drying rooms, jewelers, dent- 
ists; sand blast process for engiaving on glass 
and stone; vinegar manufactories, butter 
making, sugar refineries, glue works; burning 
liquid tuel and coal dust; grain ele^ators, con- 
veyors and dr\ers; pitching barrels for brew- 
eries; coolers for distilleries, breweries, and 
lager beer cellars; blowing organs, feeding 
printing presses, conveying telegrams and 
packages in pneumatic tubes, and numerous 
other purposes. These blowers are now in 
successful operation in the leading manufac- 
turing establishments, public buildings, etc., in 
this country and in liurope;and one which has 
been introduced at the great Chilton Colliery 
in England has attracted the attention of sci- 
entists and mechanical engineers throughout 
Great Britain, and elicited the most enthusi- 
astic commendations. In addition to the 
specialty above mentioned, this tlrm manufac- 
tures improved styles of hand blowers, tuyere 
irons, portable fort.es, rotary pumps, hydraulic 
engines, gas exhausters, etc., many of which 
are made under special letters patent con- 
trolled by this lirm. An elaboratelv illustrated 
descriptive catalogue of their products is issued 
by the firm, giving full information and par- 
ticulars as to the advantages of their various 
mechanical devices, which will be forwarded 
to interested parties upon application. The 
present industry had its inception about twen- 
ty-five years ago, when it was inaugurated in 
this citv upon a comparatively small scale bv 
the two brothers, P. H. A: F'. M. Roots, both 
of whom were skilled and jiractical mechanics, 
who had devoted special attention to the sub- 
ject of blowers and devices of a similar charac- 
ter. In 1S7S Mr. P. H. Roots died, but the 
original firm name and style have been 
retained and the interests tbrinerly held bv 
him ha\e passed into the posses-ion of his 
heir.i, who. together with Mr. V. M. Roots, one 
of the founders of the business, constitute the 
firm as it is now organized. During the early 
years of this house, the annual tratisactionsdi 1 
not exceed $j,ooo or .■pj.ooo; while at the i>res- 
eut time, w ith a tr.ade extending to all sections 
of the United .States, Great Britain and Eu- 
rope, the sales will reach more than $So,ooo 
per annum, and more th.in 20,000 of their im- 



proved blast blowers are now in actual use and 
successful operation. The plant of the exten- 
sive works in this city covers an area of about 
five acres, upon which is erected a solid and 
substantial three-story brick building I50XJC)0 
feet in dimensions, for manufacturing pur- 
poses, equipped with the most approved styles 
of special machinery, propelled by both steam 
and water power. In addition to this are nu- 
merous smaller structures for storage and 
otner purposes, including a gas house tor the 
production of gas for their own use; a lumber 
dryer, constructed upon improvetl scientific 
principles for sea.soning material; an oil house, 
ware rooms, etc. Taken tor all in all, this is 
ti'ie most complete ant extensive establish- 
ment of its class in the L'niti d States, if not in 
the world; and lor thorough reliability and 
spec al adaptability for the purposes for which 
they are intended, the products of these works 
cannot be duplicated in this or foreign coun- 
tries. Mr. F. M. Roots is a native of Oxford, 
Ohio, but is an old resident of Indiana. 

GEORGE F. STE\V.\RT, 

Makbi-e \:.d Gr.\nite Works, Cen- 
TR.M, Ave. 

The young men and boys who so noblvand 
patriotically responded to tiie calls of Presi- 
dent Lincoln for troops to aid in suppressing 
the rebellion during the dark davs ot 1S61— 3 
are the veterans of to-dav. Of the thousands 
who so proudly followed the drum-beat, and 
rallied at the bugle's call, and who were per- 
mitted to return to the peaceful pursuits of 
civil lite, many yet remain who>e history- dur- 
ing tliose eventful years is unrecorded and 
whose claims to recognition for services ren- 
dered during those troublous times, should not 
be disregarded by the pen of the historian. 
Each succeeding "decoration day" witnesses 
an augmentation of the grassy mounds in our 
cemeteries, over which float tlie glorious stars 
and stripes as a reminder of the gallant heroes 
gone to rest, and upon which patriotic hands 
strew bright flowers in memory of other days; 
and a corresponding diminution in the ranks 
of the veterans of tne w,ar, to whom has been 
entrusted by general consent this solemn yet 
patriotic observance. It is therefore eminently 
appropriate in a work of this description that 
due recognition should be accorded to those 
now in our midst, who. leaving home and 
friends tor the battlefields of the Union, ren- 
dered such valiant and valuable service in their 
respective spheres of action as to restore the 
supremacv of our free government and the 
recognition of "Old Glorv" from ocean to 
ocean, and from gulf to lakes. Mr. Geo. F. 
Stewart, the ]iresent proprietor of the marble 
and granite works on Central avenue, Con- 
nersville, at the very outbreak of the war en- 
listed as chief musician o\ artillery- under 
Capt. W. \V. Fryljarger, M.irch ist. 1S61. No 
provision being made by Congress at that time 
for artillery, the company was disbanded May 
:;th, 1S61, and two davs later Mr. .Stewart was 
mustered for one year's service in Capt. Joseph 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



21 



Marshall's Companv, idth I. V. I. Under a i 
call for three-vears men, he was, June 14th, 
1S61, transferred to the 15th Regiment, I. V. I. | 
at Camp Tippecanoe, Lal'avette, Ind., and j 
assigned 10 Co I. Being an accomplishtd mu- j 
sician he was transferred from Compa:iv I. to j 
the regimental band. I'e was subsequeLtlv 
appointed recruiting oi^icer by Gov. Morton, j 
and i-ecured twcntvtwo er.listmeuls for Com- 
pany A., I. \'. I., and was defeated by one vote I 
for the position of first lieutenant. Kecogniz j 
ing the value of his services the great war | 
Governor ol Indiana repudiated tlie result of ; 
the election and ordered a commission issued , 
to Mr. Stewart as First Lieutenant. Although 1 
aware that his defeat was brought about by I 
unfair means, he refused to accept the com- | 
mission offered him by llie Governor, and j 
entered the ranks as a private soldier. Reach- i 
ing Can^p Wayne at Ric'fimond, Ind., ho was ; 
detailed by Col. John F. Kiby as chiel clerk, | 
which position he retained until the departure | 
of the regiment lor Ini^ianapolis for linal or- j 
ganization and equipment. The regiment was j 
ordered to proceed to Nashville, Tennessee, | 
and upon its arrival .Mr. Stewait was appointed \ 
chiel clerk in the quarter-masters department j 
where he remained until June J6th, 1SC4, when | 
on account of sickness he was sent to the Ala- 1 
toona ho-pital. A lew days later he was trans- j 
ferred to ihe corps hospital, and, during his 
con\ alescen>e, was appointed clerk of the same 
by Maj. A. E. Meacham, Surgeon in Chief. 1 
On August 1st an olficer's hospital was estab- i 
lished, and he received the appointment of ' 
chief clerk, which po-iiion he held until his . 
declining health and the pressure of business j 
incapacitated him for active >ervice, and he was | 
granted a lurlough. In the iatter part of Aug- | 
ust he rejoined his regiment and was pro- 1 
moted to a position on the non-commissioned | 
staff as serjeant-m.'ijor. December 14th, he j 
was commissioned as Second Lieutenant of j 
Company E., and immediateiy thereafter de- | 
tailed as acting commissary of subsistence for 
the 1st Brigade, ist division 23d Corps d'armce. 
April ztjlh, 1S65, he was promoted to lirst 
lieutenant, and on June ;3d relieved iVom diity 
as A. C. S. July ift, 1S65, he was assigned to 
duty as A. A. A. G. of the 1st Brigade 2d 
Division, 23d Armv Corps; and on the loth of 
the same month, in addition to his duties a> A. 
A. A. G., was appointed acting assistant pro- 
vost marshal. Relieved from these positions 
August I2th, 1S65, he was placed on deratched 
service as A. A. t). C. on the stall" of Cole.nel 
Chas. S. Parish, commanding ist Division, 
23d A. C. at Salisbury, X. C. SepL ist he was 
detailed by special orders from department 
•head-quarters to proceed from Greensboro, N. 
C, with the muster out rolls of his regiment 
to Raleigh, X. C, and on the following day 
was designated by Mai. Gcn'l. Ruger, com- 
manding department of Xortii Carolina, and 
detailed to proceed to Indianapolis, Ind. with 
the rolls of his regimenL On arrival he was 
placed on special duty at the union depot by 
Gen'l. Pritchett to examine soldiers papers, 



discharges, etc., and refer them lo the proper 
paymasters. He was mustered out of service 
at Indianapolis, September i6lh, ii^5, with an 
honorable record for meritorious services in 
camp and field of which he m.iv well feel 
proud. In April, 1SS4, Mr. Stewart became 
sole proprietor of the marble and granite 
works in this city, with which he liad been pre- 
viouslv identified, and under his enterprising 
management, a prosperons an.i steadily in- 
creasing trade has aire.idy been established, 
with a patronage derived from this and ad- 
joining counties. His establishment is noted 
for its elegant and artistic designs in monu- 
memal sculpture, and for its reliable and 
thorough workmanship. Mr. Stewart is also 
sole agent in this city for the champion iron 
fence, manufactured at Kenton, Ohio, which 
is not only highiv ornamental, durable and 
cheap, but especially adapted to enclosing 
cemetery lots, public parks, private lawns, and 
for simi.ar purposes where elegance, economy 
and practical utility are the prominent de- 
siderata. 

LUDWTCK Si TAYLOR, 

Lf.MBER ANii Building Materials, 

East Conxeksville. 
The Slate of Indi.ina enjoys a more than 
national reputation as the head quarters for 
the valu.abie v;ir:et:es of hard woo<i lumber 
which are at the present day so extensively 
used, not only for furniture and cabinet work, 
but for purposes of interior decoration and 
elegant finish in both public and private build- 
ings in this country and Europe. Extensively 
engaged in tiiis important branch ot business, 
as manufacturers lor iiome consumption and 
for shipment to other slates, the firm of Lud- 
wick & Tavlor, of East Connersvihe. occupies 
a position of such marked prominence as to 
deu.and conspicuous recognition as among 
those who have been largely instrumental in 
developing the natural resources and indus- 
tries 01 this section of the State. This repre- 
sentative house had its inception in 1S72, when 
it was established by .Messrs. Hamilton eV 
Sherry who were succeeded by Hamilton i 
Xa\ lor, wlio were followed by a stock com- 
pany known as the Eagle Mill Manufacturing 
Companv. This company was succeeded by 
Messrs. McCann, Bonsai A: Co. In 1S79 tlie 
present partnership was formed. Tiiis firm 
makes a prominent specialty of manutacturing 
and dealing, both at wholesale and retail, in 
all varieties of ash, walnut, cherry and poplar 
timber; and, in connection with this branch of 
business, conduct a finely equipped planing 
mill, and door, sash and blind factory, employ- 
ing from twenty lo thirty operatives, with a 
monthly pay-roll ranging from $350 to $400. 
They occupy three and a half lots in the east- 
ern section of the city, upon which is erected a 
commodious structure for manufacturing pur- 
poses, 70x80 feet in dimensions, equipped with 
the most approved designs of wood-working 
machinery, propelled by one sixty horsepower 
engine and boiler. Their facilities are unsur- 



22 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



passed for the production of the best varieties 
of sash, doors, blinds, flooring, siding, mould- 
ing, etc., which they carry constantly in stock, 
or manufactvire to order at the most reasona- 
ble rates. Their annual transactions, which 
will at the present time exceed §50,000, are not 
confined to local demands, as they ship larsjely 
to adjacent counties and to the neighboring 
states. Mr. L. F. Ludwick was born in Pre- 
ble County, Ohio, in 1S38, and tias been for 
several years identitied with liie lumber and 
manufacturing interests of this section. Mr. 
J. F. Taylor, also a native of tlie same county 
and state, was born in 1S35. He was a mem- 
ber of the gallant 71st Ohio Volunteers, during 
the war of the rebellion, and with that com- 
mand participated in many of the most event- 
ful and stirring campaigns and engagements 
ofthat eventful period. He was iionorably 
discharged in 1S63, and since his return to 
civil life has been actively engaged i nmercan- 
tile and manufacturing pursuits. 

McFARLAN CARRIAGE CO., 

CaRRIAGRS AND BUGGIliS. 
The manufacture of fine carriages and bug- 
gies is one of the most prominent and extensive 
of Connersville's commercial and industrial 
enterprises The favorable -location of tliecitv, 
with reference to its admirable facilities for 
procuring almost unlimited supplies otthe best 
materials from the lumber-producing districts 
of this section especiallv adapted to carriage 
work, the advantages which it offers as a 
desirable and economical place of residence for 
skilled laborers, its excellent system of inter- 
communication by rail with all sections of the 
Union, and the enterprise exhibited by such 
representative establishments as that which 
forms the subject of the present sketch, com- 
bine to give to our progressive and thriving 
municipality a national reputation as a promi- 
nent manufacturing metropolis, especially in 
this department of industry. The .McFarlan 
Carriage Company, now the n'ost extensive of 
its class in this county, is the outgrowth of an 
enterprise which was inaugurated about a 
quarter of a century ago bv Mr. J. B. Mc Far- 
Ian on a very small scale, and with but little 
capital. For the first tew years the annual 
transactions did not exceed $2,000; while for 
1S83 the sales of the company were more than 
$170,000, a showing which reflects the highest 
credit upon the energy, enterprise and iidmin- 
istrativeability with which its tjusiness has been 
conducted. The present company was organ- 
ized in 1SS3, and the individual members are 
Messrs. J. B., C. E., J E. and \V. W. McFar- 
lan. The senior member and founder of this 
extensive organization is a native of England, 
and the olher members were all born in Indi- 
ana, and have been, since attaining their ma- 
jority, identified with the mterests of this 
establishment. An average force of about 
seventy-five skilled workmen is employed in 
the various departments in the manufacture of 
the difierent styles of carriages, buggies, ligiit 
wagons, etc., and not less than 1,500 new jobs 



are turned out annually, which are sold princi- 
pally in the states of Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky 
and Illinois, although shipments are frequently 
made to more remote sections of the Union. 
From time to time the requirements of the 
steadily increasing trade has necessitated 
enlarged quarters and more ample facilities, 
and buildings have been added to the original 
factory until, at the present time, four build- 
'ngs with an aggregate floor space of more 
tlian 36,000 square feet are utilized for manu- 
facturing purposes, and even this has been 
found inadequate for tiie prosecution of their 
business and the company are at the present 
time (1SS4) contemplating the erection of one 
large substantial structure to take the place of 
the buildings now occupied, where, under one 
roof the entire operations of the company may 
be more successfully conducted, and where ail 
the requisite machinery, conveniences and 
facilities may be introduced, and the latest 
improvements utilized in the various depart- 
ments. This, when completed, will be a credit 
alike to the city and to the enterprising mem- 
bers of this representative company, which 
has, from a comparatively insignificant coin- 
mencement, attained its present magnitude 
and magnificent proportions by honest etl'orts, 
reliable workmanship and a strict adherence 
to the principles of commercial integrity. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Justly ranked among the most solid and 
reliable fiduciary institutions of the State of 
Indiana, the First National Bank of Conners- 
ville occupies a prominent place and exerts an 
active influence upon the financial condition 
and general thrift of the community. This 
bank which has a capital of $100,000, with a 
surplus fund exceeding $30,000, was originally 
organized in 1S64, as the"Connersyille Branch 
of the Bank of the Slate of Indiana," bv 
Messrs. B. F. and E. F. Claypool, and was 
reorganized as a national bank under the pro- 
visions of the United States national banking 
system, February 25th, 1S65, when the follow- 
ing named officers were elected: B. F. Clav- 
pool, president; E. F. Claypool, cashier. The 
board of directors consisted of the two gentle- 
men above named, and J. M. Wilson, H. D. 
Carlisle, P. H. Roots and F. M. Roots. In 1873 
Mr. P. H. Roots was elected president, and 
Charles Mount Cashier, occupying these posi- 
tions until 1S79, when at'fer tiie death of Mr. 
P. H. Roots, in 1879, Mr. F. M. Roots was 
chosen president, and Mr. F. T. Roots vice- 
president. In 1S73 Mr. G. W. Uhl was elected 
assistant cashier, which position he held up to 
the time of his death in 18S3. The business of 
this institution is very extensive, aggregating 
more than $2,000,000 per annum; and its 
transactions involve general banking opera- 
tions in all departments. Deposits are received, 
loans effected, commercial paper negotiated, 
collections made on all points, and exchanges 
etl'ected on all the principal cities in the Union 
upon the most favorable terms; also, govern- 
ment bonds bought and sold, and exchange 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



23 



furnished on all principal cities of Europe. 
The present building occupied is a two-story 
brick structure ;;ox44 feet in dimensions at the 
corner of Central Avenue and Fifth St., 
■which, in its interior arrangement, is admira- 
bly adapted for the purposes for which it is 
used. It contains a fine vault of the most ap- 
proved construction, with fire and burglar- 
proof safe of the best make with improved 
time-locks, and every provision is made to 
ensure absolute securitv to depositors and 
patrons. The members of the board of direc- 
tors and stock-liolders are as follows: F. M. 
Roots, Cha^. Mount, E. Mount, S. C. Roots, 
F. T. Roots and John Uhl of this city, and G. 
Y. Roots of Cincinnati, O., representing an 
aggregate responsibility of between one and 
two million dollars. These are widely known 
in financial, political and commercial circles, 
and with such a management the First Na- 
tional Hank of Connersville is a favorite finan- 
<:ial and fiduciary institution, and while 
achieving success' in its legitimate banking 
operations, has at the same time secured and 
retained the respect and consideration of the 
entire community throughout which its opera- 
tions are conducted. 

CONNERSVILLE FURNITURE MANU- 
FACTURING CO. 
The natural and acquired advantages of the 
city of Connersville, in respect to its geograph- 
ical situation in the very heart of one of the 
best hard-wood lumber districts of the great 
State of Indiana, its admirable system of inter- 
communication by railroad with all points of 
the Union, its low' rates of taxation in compari- 
son with the great cities, and its desirability as 
a place of residence for mechanics, renders it 
one of the most eligible points in the country 
for the successful prosecution of the furniture 
business, and capitalists and practical business 
•men have not been slow to avail themselves 
of these advantages in the establishment of 
great factories whose products have gained a 
national reputation, and meet with are.idy sale 
in the trade centres of the United States. One 
-of the most prominent of Indiana's important 
industries is that conducted by the Conners- 
ville Furniture Manufacturing Company, 
which was organized as ajoint-stock company 
in February, 1SS2, and the following named 
officers (who still occupy their original posi- 
tions) were elected: President, F. .M. Roots; 
vice-president, Chas. Mount; Secretary, N. W. 
Wright, and E. V. Hawkins, superintendent. 
The premises occupied by this company em- 
brace an aggregate area ot about nine acres, 
upon which is erected a two-story frame struc- 
ture 28x140 feet in dimensions, and a six-story 
brick building 50x150 feet in size, occupied for 
manufacturing purposes, and numerous 
■smaller buildings and sheds tor the storage of 
seasoned stock and materials. In tlie manu- 
facturing department the most approved 
klesigns of special wood-working machinery 
are employed, which derives its motive force 
.from one seventy-five horse-power engine and 



boiler, and one forty-five horse-power water 
wheel, propelled by water from the White 
Water canal. An average force 01 one hun- 
dred and fifty skilled and experienced workmen 
is employed in the various departments, and 
the very best materials are used in the manu- 
facture "of fine and common furniture, bedroom 
suites, bureaus, etc. This company makes a 
prominent specialty of producing the latest 
and most oesirable designs in high-priced tur- 
niture reduced to cheaper grades of walnut and 
other hard-wood goods, the demand for which 
extends to the most remote sections of the 
United States and territories. The olhcersand 
members of the company are among our most 
enterprising and public-spirited citizens and 
capitalists, and the operations of the organiza- 
tion, under its present able and etVective man- 
agement, are of great importance and benefit 
to the industrial and commercial thrift of this 
community. 



CONNERSVILLE HYDRAULIC MILLS, 
H. L. Wetherald & Sons, Washing- 
ton' Stkket. 
As one of the most important industries of 
Connersville, and one of the oldest established 
among her numerous and succcsslul manufac- 
turing enterprises, we notice especially the 
popular Hydraulic Flouring Mills, now con- 
ducted by "Messrs. H. L. Wetlier.ild & Sons, 
which were originally established half a cen- 
tury ago by Messrs. Moore Ai. Lawrence, upon 
the old style principle then in vogue. The 
property came into the possession of the pres- 
ent proprietors in 1S67, and in the following 
year the mills were totally destroyed by fire, 
but were immediately rebuilt upon a more 
extensive scale. The present building is a 
substantial brick structure 45x64 feet in dimen- 
sions, containing two and one-half stories with 
a commodious basement, and equipped 
throughout with the latest improved machin- 
ery and devices for the manufacture of a supe- 
rior grade of flour. This is the largest and most 
complete flouring mill in the city, and was 
thoroujhlv remodeled in 18S3, at which time 
the roller process system was introduced, and 
twelve sets of rolls with other improved devices 
of special machinery were substituted for that 
hitherto employed.' In addition to the mill 
proper, this firm occupies for storage and ship- 
ping purposes, a large brick warehouse on line 
of C. H. it. D. R. R., near depot, which is two 
stories, 40x100 feet in dimensions, with an"L" 
about the same size, giving a storage capacity 
of 50,(X» to Oo.ooo bushels; a frame warehouse 
26x40 feet in size, in convenient proximity to 
the mill and the tracks of the White Water 
Valley Railroad, from whence shipments are 
made to Cincinnati, Baltimore, New York, and 
to others of the principal cities in the Eastern 
States. The capacity of these mills is one hun- 
dred and fit'ty tarr'els of choice tiour every 
twenty-four hours, and their products in which 
thev make a prominent specialty, are strait 
grade and bakers' flour, the leading brands r ^ 
which are the "Indiana Favorite," "Ravens- 



24 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



■wood," "Hometrade," "Morning Glorv," etc. 
The indivicinal members of the present firm 
are P. B. Wood and E. K. Welheridd, the lat- 
ter a native and life-long resident of Conners 
ville, who has been prominentlv identilieu 
with the grain trade and milling; interests in 
this section for many years. Mr. Wood is a 
native of the State ol Ohio, and prior to the 
formation of the present partnership, was en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits. Under the firm- 
name and style of Wetherald, Wood cS; Co. the 
same parties operate the well-known "Premi- 
um Mills" at Hebron, Nebraska; and, in .addi- 
tion to their e.xtensive manufacturing interests, 
are among the most proniment dealers in, and 
shippers of grain to the eastern markets, their 
annual transactions aggregating an immense 
sum, and contributing in no small degree to 
the commercial thrilt of our prosperous and 
progressive municipality. 

GRAND HOTEL, 

George Wanlf.y, PRorRiKTOR. 
The requisites of a first-class hotel are: that 
its location be central, its .nccommodalions for 
the traveling public good, its management 
efficient and solicitous of the welfare and com- 
fort of its guests, its table plentifully supplied 
with the necessaries as well as luxuries of the 
season, its attendants courteous and polite, and 
all its arrangements and appointments on a 
liberal scale. These requisites are all possessed 
by the Grand Hotel of Connersville, which is 
eligibly located on Fifth street near the Valley 
depot, and which, under the able and efficient 
management of its present proprietor, Mr. 
George Wanley, is justly entitled to a promi- 
nent rank among the leading caravanseries of 
Eastern Indiana. This popular hotel was 
erected in iS6o by Mr. Sherman Schofield, and 
was originally opened for the reception of 
guests by Mr. Grier, and was for some years 
known as the "Schofield House." Mr. Grier 
was succeeded in the management bv Mr. 
Lawrence, and he in t\irn by Mr. Gray, then 
by Mr. Rockwell and Mr. Wni. Horton, after 
which the hotel remained vacant for some 
time. It was subsequently re-opened bv Mr. 
Lou Fox who occupied a portion of the build- 
ing and b_v whom it was re-christened as the 
"Sheridan House." He was succeeded by Mr. 
Clint Jones, after whom Messrs. Fribarger 
Bros, assumed the management, thev having 
for some time previous been the owners of the 
building. They were succeeded bv Mr. Wm. 
West, and after his retirement the house again 
remained vacant until 1878, when the present 
proprietor, after extensive alterations and 
repairs, re-opened it as the Grand Hotel. This 
spacious and commodious structure which is 
three stories in height, has a tVontage on Fifth 
St. of 100 feet and a depth of 90 feet. On 
the first floor is the otfice, the dining-room 
with a seating capacity offit'ty-six guests, a 
reading and writing room, a large double sam- 
ple room for the accommodation of commer- 
cial travelers, bar and billiard parlors with two 
first-class tables, and the kitchen and culinary 



departments. On the second floor are the 
ladies parlors and reception rooms, the family 
rooms and several sleeping rooms. The entire 
third floor is occupied for guest chambers and 
sleeping apartments. The rates at the Grand 
Hotel have been placed at popular prices of 
$:!.oo per day tor transient guests, with liberal 
reductions to persons making a prolonged 
stav. Mr. Wanley is an old resident of Indi- 
ana, and has been prominently identified with 
hotel interests for many years in this section. 
Previous to assuming the management of the 
Grand, he had been successlully connected 
with tnany of the hotels in this city, and is 
perhaps the onlv one who has made a com- 
plete success of this hotel. Mr. Wanley is 
emphaticallv a selt'-made man, having com- 
menced life without capital or means, and 
achieved his present position in lite through 
his own exertions and al>ility, unaided by the 
influence or money of relatives or friends. He 
is one of the most popular landlords in this 
section, and enjovs a wide and inriuential circle 
of acquaintances among the traveling public. 

WM. H. BECK, 

Mkkcha.nt Tailor and Proprietor of 

Pioneer Cluthing Hoisk. 
Whether in a great city, where there are 
manv engaged in the same industrial or com- 
mercial pursuits, or in a coiiiinunity where 
there are but tew, some one firm or individual 
will he found alwavs at the head. Especially 
is this true in regard to the clothing and mer- 
chant tailoring business and its associated 
departments where proficiency, artistic ability, 
and enterprise are sure to meet with a merited 
reward and corresponding success. These 
quaUiications are possessed in an eminent 
degree by the Pioneer Clothing House, located 
at No. 420 and 422 Central Avenue. At this 
location, in a small frame b\iilding originally 
occupied and erected by Mr. William Walton 
as earlv as 1825, the present proprietor and his 
brother, Mr. Cliristian Beck, under the firm- 
name of Beck Bros., commenced business on 
a comparatively small scale in 1S56. The 
present commodious two-story brick structure 
wa.s erected in 1S6S, and in 1876 the junior 
member of the original firm died, since which 
time Mr. Wm. H. Beck has conducted the 
business in his own name with a steadily in- 
creasing patronage and growing trade until his 
annual transactions at the present time will, 
exceed $40,000. The present salesroom is 
33x65 feet in diiuensions, and the stock ot 
piece-goods ot newest styles is among the 
largest and most complete to be found in 
eastern Indiana, comprising a choice and ad- 
mirably selected assortment of imported and 
American fabrics for gentlemen's wear, from 
which patrons may make their selections and 
order full suits or single garments made up in 
the most elegant and artistic manner, gentle- 
men's furnishing yoods, underwear and ready 
custom-made clothing for men or boys, hats, 
caps, notions, etc. The manufacturing depart- 
ment is presided over by Mr. Beck and T. M. 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



25- 



Jennings, his cutter, who has been with him 
twcnlv-two years. The most perfect and styl- 
ish fits are guaranteed, and an avcrag.; force of 
twelve experieneed workmen are employed 
turning out garments, which in style and 
workmanship will not suffer by compari-on 
■with those c.l any metropolitan establishment 
east or west. Mr. Wm. H. Beck is a native of 
Pittsburgh, Penn., where he was born in July, 
iSiS, and came to this city with his parents 
when but a child. His father was one of the 
earlier citizens of this section and conducted a 
tailoring establishment in this city until 1S50, 
soon after which he was succeeded by his sons, 
the present proprietor and Mr. Christian Beck. 
The latter entered the Union army at the out- 
break of the war of the rebellion as a second 
lieutenant m the 2d Indiana Cavalry. He 
served during the war with great credit and 
distinction, and for distinguished gallantry and 
meritorious services was promoted to the rank 
of Major in the 7th and Colonel in tlie 9th 
Indiana Cavalry. He was taken prifoncr late 
in the war and imprisoned in Atlanta and Lib- 
by, and shortly prior to the expiration of tlie 
war, he resigned on account of ill health, 
receiving an honorable discharge. He subse- 
• quently died in tliis city in 1S76, universally 
regretted and highly esteemed by all wiih 
whom he had been associated in military or 
private lite. Since that time the business has 
been continued by Mr. Wm. H. Beck, wlio has 
succeeded in securing and liolding the leading 
business of this department of trade here. 

DOWNS, READY & CO., 

Planing Mills, Contractors and 
Builders, Rear of Andre Opera 
House. 
Among the prominent local industrial opera- 
tions, and one which contributes in a marked 
degree to the thrift and prosperity of this sec- 
tion of the State, is the establishment of 
Messrs. Downs, Ready i Co., whose planing 
mills and lumber yards are located in the rear 
of the Andre Opera House in this city. The 
premises occupied by this firm embrace a large 
two-story brick structure 55x109 leet in dimen- 
sions, besides additional ground space, in which 
the latest approved appliances of labor-saving 
machinery is brought into requisition for the 
effective and rapid production of all work asso- 
ciated with this department of industry — the 
machinery being propelled by a thirty horse- 
power engine and boiler, and giving employ- 
ment to an average force of forty to sixty hands 
in their extensive business operations. The 
building occupied was originally built many 
years ago, and was previously occupied as a 
pork-packing establishment, up to about 1S75, 
at which time tlie building was fitted up for 
the present business and planing mills, con- 
ducted by Messrs. Stewart, Andre ij Co. 
Several changes subsequently occurred in the 
proprietorship up to the time the business 
came into the hands, upon the organization of 
the present firm in 18S1. Messrs. Downs, 
Ready ii Co. are contractors and builders, and 



manufacturers of doors, sash, blinds, mould' 
ings, scroll-work. etc., and with facilities unsur' 
passed for the prompt and faithful execution 
of all work entrusted to their care, are pre- 
pared to supj'lv contractors or builders with 
materials in this line, or to enter into contract 
lor the erection of public or private edifices, 
and execute job-work, supplying designs and 
specifications wherever desired in this or ad- 
joining counties of this State or adjoining 
states. This house has controlled and executed 
the work upon the buildings of our important 
manulacturing establishments here, and other 
public and private edifices, and is now execut- 
ing the contract for the new buildings of the 
Oxford Female College at Oxford, Ohio— 
their annual transactions ranging from $60,000 
to $So,ooo. The present firm is composed of 
Thos. Downs, Austin Ready and Richard G. 
Wait, all of whom are practical workmen and 
thorough business men, whose operations have 
contributed in no small degree to the progres- 
sive interests of this city and Eastern Indiana. 

T. L. GRIFFIS, 

Dry Goods, Clothing, etc.. No. 426 
Ckstkal Avenue. 
In the extent, variety and completeness of 
stock carried in its various departments, as 
well as in the magnitude of its annual trans- 
actions, the representative house ot Mr. T. L. 
Grillis stands pre eminently aujong the leading 
mercantile establisliments in this section of the 
State. Nor has this result been attained by 
any grand flourish of trumpets, or extensive 
distribution of printers' ink; but is rather the 
legitimate fruits of enterprise, integrity, busi- 
ness sagacity, and well directed eflbrt through 
a period of more than a quarter of a century on 
the part of its energetic, public-spirited pro- 
prietor, who, commencing business in this 
city in 1S59 on a comparatively small scale, 
determined to deserve and achieve success, 
has steadily won his w ay by fair and honorable 
dealing to the proud position he occupies to- 
dav among the representative merchants and 
self-made business men of our great and grow- 
ing state. This house had its inception as 
above noted in a building adjoining its present 
location, and was removed in 1S69 to its present 
quarters, where the entire first floor and base- 
ment, each 19x120 feet in dimensions, with 
two rooms on the second floor with an aggre- 
gate floor space of 19x75 feet, are occupied tor 
the storage and display of an extensive and 
admirablv selected stock oftbreign and domes- 
tic dry goods, woolens, dress tabrics, ready- 
made clothing, ladies' and gentlemen's lur- 
nishing goods, carpets, notions, small wares, 
gloves, hosiery, and general family and house- 
furnishing supplies pertaining to this special 
branch ot trade, ranging in value according to- 
the season Irom $20,ckx) to $;?o,ooo. Seven 
competent and experienced assistants are em- 
ployed in the sales department; and unilbrm 
prices, courteous attention and honorable deal- 
ing characterize the transactions of this 'uodel 
emporium. The trade is derived from the city 



PUBLIC LI3RARY 

Rushvilie, indiena 



26 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



and from the adjacent towns and country, 
within a radius ol twenty miles; and the annual 
sales at the present time will exceed $60,000. 
Mr. T. L. GritHs is a native and life-long resi- 
dent of Connersville. and was born October 
loth 1826. He commenced his mercantile 
career in this citv in iSf6 as a salesman in the 
establishment ot° Mr. Daniel Hankins, and in 
1S51 became a partner in the house, where he 
remained until embarking in bus-iness on his 
own account as above noted. 

W. J. CAIN, 

Stoves and Tinware, Fifth Street. 
One of the leading houses in this line in the 
citv of Connersville is that conducted by Mr. 
W'. J. Cain on Filth Street, where one tioor 
22x75 feet in dimensions is occupied for sales 
and manufacturing purposes, in the tbrmer 
department mav be found a fine assortment of 
the most popular varieties of cooking and 
heating stoves iVom the most noted manufac- 
turers of the Union, hollow ware and kitchen 
furnishing goods in great variety, embracing 
tin, copper and sheet-iron ware of his own 
manufacture. This representative house came 
into the possession of its present proprietor in 
18S0, at which time he -.ucceeded Nelson Bros., 
who had established the business some years 
previously. The stock carried ranges in value 
from $3,000 to $4,000 and the annual transac- 
tions will closely approximate $20,000. From 
four to six skilled workmen are employed in 
the manufacturing department under the per- 
sonal supervision of Mr. Cain, who is himself 
a practical worker in metals and a thorough 
mechanic. Mr. Cain is a native of Brookville, 
Indiana, and has resided in this city since 
1880, where he has by industry, application 
and strict integritv, established a trade extend- 
ing throughout tliis and adjoining towns. Es- 
pecial attention is given to tin and slate 
roofing, and this house controls a large portion 
of the work for this and adjoining counties, 
offering special inducements in this line. 

W. T. DALE & CO., 

Lumber, Lath, Shingles, etc., Sixth 
Street. 
The well known house of W. T. Dale & 

Co. had its inception upon a. comparatively 
small .scale in 1S62, and has steadily grown 
and prospered with the prosperity of our pro- 
gressive and thriving municipality. This firm 
occupies on Sixth St., between Central 
Avenue and the Valley Railroad, a ground 
space of about a half an acre, upon which are 
erected ofKce and buildings tor the storage of 
manufactured material, seasoned stock, lime 
and building materials generally. In their 
yards they carrv at all times a large stock of 
lumber of every description, flooring, siding, 
lath, shingles, etc., together with all the regu- 
lar sizes of doors, sash bhnds, door and window 
frames, moldings, iime, etc. The valuation of 
their stock ranges from $5,000 to $8,000, and 
their annual sales will considerably exceed 
$20,000. This tirm enjoys unexceptional facili- 



ties for furnishing, in any desired quantity 
and dimension, finishing materials at the short- 
est notice, and carpenters, contractors and 
builders' estimates will be given especial 
attention and bottom rates. Mr. W. T. Dale, . 
who is one of our oldest and most widely 
know n and highly esteemed citizens, is a native 
and life-long resident of this city, where he 
was born in 1S24. His father moved to this 
countv in 1S14. He is by education and train- 
ing a practical mechanic, and prior to embark- 
ing in the lumber business as above noted, was 
engaged in mechanical pursuits for several 
years. He has filled the responsible and hon- 
orable position of Justice of the Peace for the 
past twenty vears, and has been prominently 
identified with the growth, development and 
progress of this city for more than a quarter of 
a centurv. His son and business associate, M. 
E. Dale, was born in this county in 1S51, and 
is also favorably known in connection with 
our local prosperity and commercial interests, 
and occupies a prominent position in social 
and political circles. 

BUCKLEY HOUSE, 

S. M. Cook, Proprietor. 
The popular hotel now known as the "Buck-' 
lev House," located on Fifth street in conven- 
ient proximity to the business centre of the 
town, has been occupied for hotel purposes 
more than forty years. It was erected by Mr. 
Durner, whose name it bore for several years, 
and was originally a small establishment with 
a capacitv for less than half the number of 
guests which can now be accommodated under 
its hospitable roof. In 1S75 the property was 
purchased by Mr. Wm. Buckley, by whom 
extensive additions and alterations were made 
and the name changed to the Buckley House. 
It was rented bv him to Mr. Wanley, now the 
manager of the Grand Hotel in this city, who 
conducted it successfully for about three years, 
when he was succeeded bv a Mr. Brown. In 
September, 18S2, Mr. S. M. Cook, the present 
proprietor assumed the management of the 
house, and under his liberal and energetic ad- 
ministration, the Buckley House has attained a 
prominent rank among the representative 
hotels of E«stern Indiana. The structure 
which was erected expressly for the purposes 
for which it is now used has a frontage of 100 
feet on Fifth street, and of 60 feet on Eastern 
avenue. On the first floor is a spacious office, 
wash-room, reading and writing rooms, ladies' 
parlors, reception room, dining-room, kitchen 
and culinarv departments, etc. The second 
and third floors are devoted exclusively to 
sleeping apartments and guest chambers, 
about fiftv in number, which are neatly and 
comtbrtablv furnished and kept at all times in 
the very best of order. The Buckley is a 
favorite' stopping place tor commercial travel- 
ers, business men and the better classes of the 
traveling public, and the rates having been 
placed at the popular price of $2.00 per d.-ty for 
transient guests, ensure a liberal patronage. 
Mr. Cook is well and favorably known as a 



CITY OF CONN'ERSVILLE. 



27 



genial and affable host, tlioroiighly conversant 
with the wants and requirements of his guests, 
and no pains are spared by him or tho^c in his 
employ to render pleasant and agreeable the 
stay of those who are fortunate enough to avail 
themselves of his generous hospitality during 
their sojourn in our thriving and progressive 
municipality. Mr. S. M. Cook was liorn in 
Chester county, Penn., October .;4th, 1S36, but 
moved to this Sta'e with his parents in 1857. 
He is a self made man in the full acceptance of 
the word, commencing life without means, he 
and succeed', d in amassing considerable prop- 
erty, although his business career has been 
attended with many reverses. The greater 
portion of his bu^iness life has been devoted to 
mercantile pursuits in Indianapolis and Plain- 
field, this State. By him the Mansion House 
at Plainfield was erected and successfullv con- 
ducted for some years: he also conducted a 
successlul mercantile house in that town prior 
to his removal here in iSS.;. 

LEONARD, MORRISON & CO., 

Grocers, No. 432 Cen"tr.\l Avenue. 
Among the representative houses whose 
extensive transactions and high standing 
entitle them to recognition and favorable con- 
sideration, is that now conducted bv the firm 
■of Leonard, Moni-on A: Co.. whose sales and 
warerooms are located at No. 43J Central 
Ave., with an "L" extending through to Fifth 
St. On the former thoroughfare, this firm 
occupies for business purposes, the entire first 
and second floors with basement, each 20X'jo 
feet in dimensions, while the "L" fronting on 
Fifth street is 20x40 feet in size. The stock 
embraces a general line of the best grades of 
staple and fancy groceries, foreign and domes- 
tic fruits, and canned goods, tobacco and 
cigars, farm and dairy produce, provisions and 
table and culinary supplies of everv descrip- 
tion, together with a great variety of miscel- 
laneous merchandise ordinarilv classified 
under the generic term of grocers' sundries. 
They also are extensive dealers in china, 
-crockery and glassware and house-furnishing 
goods pertaining to this special branch of 
trade. The average valuation of their stock in 
the various departments ranges from SS.ooo to 
$10,000, and their annual transactions exceed 
$50,000. The present firm are the successors 
in a direct line of the first exclusive grocery 
house established in this citv, which was 
founded in iS6o by Messrs. Sellers & Leonard, 
who, after fifteen months, were succeeded bv 
Leonard & Bro. The subsequent changes in 
the proprietorship of this establishment were 
Leonard & Ross, J. W. Ross, and Ross & 
Morrison, who conducted the business until 
1SS2, when the present partnership was 
formed. Seven clerks and assistants are em- 
ployed in the sales department, and the trade 
■of this house is derived from both city and 
■Country. Mr. J. S. Leonard, the senior mem- 
l5er of the present firm, is a native of Fairfield 
county, Ohio, where he was born in 1S39. He 
came to this city in 1S60, and has since been 



prominently identified with the grocery trade 
as well as with other industrial enterprises of 
the city, noticed at length in other portions of 
this work. Mr. N. T. Slorrison is a native and 
life-long resident of Connersville, and was 
born in 1S52; and Mr. \'alentine Leonard was 
born in 1S41. He devotes his personal atten- 
tion to the management of the affairs of the 
Connersville Pearl Hominy Co., in which this 
firm are extensively interested as stock-holders 
and prominent owners. 



WM. DEVOR, 

RooFiNn AND Cornice Works, Cen- 
tral Avenue. 
Conspicuous among the local industries of 
Connersville is the tinning and roofing estab- 
lishment and galvanized iron cornice manu- 
factory of Mr. U'm. Devor on Central Avenue, 
where one floor 20x45 feet in dimensions is 
occupied for manufacturing purposes. The 
specialties are galvanized cornices, window and 
door caps, fineals, etc. They also pay C'ipecial 
attention to slate, tin and metal roofing, spout- 
ing, guttering, etc., and general jobbing, and 
repairing in all branches and departments of 
the above named pursuits. The present busi- 
ness was established in 1S62 upon a compara- 
tively small scale, and has grown to its present 
satisiactorv proportions mainlv through the 
exertions and enterprise displayed by Mr. 
Devor, who has been at the head of the estab- 
lishment during the greater portion of this 
period. Mr. Devor is an old resident of Indi- 
ana, and has been for many years engaged in 
the present business, with all departments of 
which he is practically conversant. In addition 
to the business above referred to, he is exclu- 
sive agent in this city for the Minneapolis 
Twine Binder, and, during the past tour years, 
he has sold to the farmers in this and adjoining 
counties, large numbers of these popular ma- 
chines, whicii have in every instance given the 
most unbounded satisfaction wherever they 
have been used. 

H. C. ELIASON, 

Hard Wood Lumber. 
Prominent among the manufacturers and 
dealers in the valuable products of our forests 
is the well-known mills and lumber yard now 
conducted bv Mr. H. C. Eliason, whicii was 
founded in 1S76 bv Bower & Eliason. and came 
into the entire control .ind possession of the 
present proprietor in 1S79. The premises 
occupied cover an area ol about four acres, 
upon which is erected a commodious mill with 
a capacity for manufacturing 10,000 feet per 
day, and cutting lumber thirty-three teet in 
length. The machinery employed is of the 
best and most approved style, and the motive 
power is furnished by one forty horse-power 
engine and boiler. Eight hands are employed 
in the manufacturing department and yards, 
and the products of the mill, consisting chiefly 
of the best grades of walnut, poplar, ash and 
cherry lumber, are shipped in car-load lots to 
the principal cities of this and neighboring 



28 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



states. "Mr. Eliason, who is a native and life- 
lont; resident ol' this State, lias been for many 
^•ears prominently idcntilled witli the commer- 
cial and industrial interests of Connersville. 
He is one of our most entcrprisint;, eneri^etic, 
and public-spirited citizens, and has for the past 
two years represented the third ward of this 
city as a member of the city council. 

CONNERSVILLE PEARL HOMINY 
COMPANY. 

AmonK the numerous manufacturinijestab- 
lishment'i located here, none rank higher in 
qualily of proilucts than the above. It had its 
inception in iSS;, and its products are hominy, 
grits, corn -Hour, cream meal, pearl meal, feed 
meal, etc. 'I'he wiile reputation of the products 
have secured a large trade, extentling through 
the north, east and Southern States. The 
building utilized is a substantial three-story 
building 40x150 I'eet, equipped with improved 
machinery, propelled by water power;alihough 
steam power is also ii«ed when required. The 
capacity is 1,000 bushels of corn in twenty-four 
hours. The officers of the present company 
are W. H. Wherrett, president; Val. Leonard, 
secretary and treasurer. 

A. ROTIIERMEL, 

Jeweler, Books, Stationery, Wall- 
Paper, Etc. 
The leading jewelry house of the city of 
Connersville, located at Zeller's old stand on 
Central avenue, is now conducted by Mr. A. 
Rotherniel, who commenced business m this 
city upon a comparativelv small scale in iSSi, 
and has since that time established a large and 
lucrative trade, which will compare t'avorably 
■with that of any contemporaneous establish- 
ment of a similar character in this section of 
the county. His salesroom, which is 17x65 
feet in dimensions, is tilted up in an elegant 
and tasteful manner, and his show-cases 
present an attractive di-^play of elegant 
articles pertaining to this branch of trade, in- 
cluding fine American watches, clocks and 
jewelry, solid silver and plated ware, and a 
gi'eat variety of useful and ornamental articles, 
together with school book« and supplies, sta- 
tionery, picture frames, sewing machines, par- 
lor organs, etc. liis large and diversified sLock 
also includes a full hne of spectacles and eye- 
glasses. He also makes a leading specialty of 
fine watch repairing, and being practically 
familiar with the delicate mechanism of ;he 
various styles of watches now in use, is pre- 
pared to execute all work of this nature 
entrusted to his care promptU', and in the most 
thorough and workmanlike manner. Mr. 
Rothermel, w ho is a native of Germany, was 
born in 1S4S, and came to tlie United States In 
1S67. Previous to becoming a resident of Con- 
nersville in iSSi, he had been engaged in the 
jewelry business at Laurel, Ind., where he 
commenced on his own account in 1S70, and 
at Brookville, where he remained for nine 
years. In his present enterprise, he brings to 
the business extended experience in the me- 



chanical department, a thorough knowledge of 
values, an excellent judgment in the selection 
of stocic, and a character lor integrity and hon- 
orable dealing which has secured for him the 
confidence of the community, and the esteem 
of all with whom he has enjoyed business 
relations. 

A. M. ANDREWS, 

Druggist and Pharmaci.st. 
There is no department of our commercial 
and industrial system requiring for its success- 
ful prosecution more thorough knowledge and 
professional skill than that of the druggist and 
pharmacist, and the eminent degree of success^ 
« hicli has attended the popidar pharmacy 
located in Huston's block, during the past 
seven years, is a sufncient evivience of the 
[iractical adaptation of it!i enterprising proprie- 
tor, .Mr. A. M. Andrews, to the requirements 
and peculiarities of the business in which dur- 
ing that time he has been so successfully 
engaged. This is one of the old-established 
and most favorably known drug stores of Con- 
nersville, and since passing into the possession 
of its present proprietor in 1S77, its annual 
transactions have increased in a ratio of more 
than 100 per cent. Mr. Andrews occupies for 
salesroom, prescription department and labora- 
tory, one floor iSxii2 feet in dimensions, car- 
rying a full line of the purest and freshest 
drugs, chemicals, i)aints, oils, varnishes, pro- 
prietary medicines, toilet articles, perfumeries, 
notions, stationery, druggists' simdries, etc.,. 
and makes a prominent specialty of compound- 
ing physicians' prescriptions, family recipes 
and pharmaceutical compoumis. The projirie- 
tor, Mr. Andrews, is a native and life long 
resident of the State of Indiana, and having 
been identified with the drug trade for nearly 
a quarter of a century, is thoroughly and prac- 
ticallv conversant with all the details of the 
business, and as an experienced chemist and 
pharmacist has gained the fullest confidence of 
the medical fraternity in this city and adjacent 
towns. He is also regarded as one of our most 
liberal and public-spirited citizens, and at the 
present time ably and acceptably represents 
his ward in the city government as a member 
of council. 



J. M. HERON & CO., 

Fine Boots and Siiucs, S. W. Cor. 

Central Ave. and Fit th St. 
One of the most enterprising boot and shoe 
houses of Eastern Indiana may be tound in the 
city of Connersville, at the corner of Central 
Avenue and Fifth Street. This representa- 
tive house which has for the past five vears 
been conducted by Messrs. J. M. Heron i Co.,- 
had its inception more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago, when it was established by Mr. John 
F. Cassill, now of Greensburg. During this 
entire period it has at all times maintained a 
prominent rank among its contemporaries, 
and under its present energetic and enterpris- 
ing management, is the recognized head-quar- 
ters for the better grades of boots and shoes 



CITY OF CONTSTIRSVILLE. 



29 



■for ladies', gentlemen's and children's 
■wear. Messrs. Heron X' Co. occupy the most 
prominent location in this city, emlirncni'^" a 
iine biusincss room j.;x()0 feet h\ dimen.sions at 
the above named central and desiraljle loca- 
tion, carrying a comprehensive and carefully 
selected stock of merchandise in this line, 
making a prominent specialty ofthe celebrated 
■"X" kip boot, manufactured expressly lor their 
trade. The average valuation of stock carried 
is not less than $5,000, and their annual sales 
■will compare favorably with those of any 
similar hou^c in the lar^^er cities of the state. 
The individual members ofthe firm are J. M. 
Heron and Miss Kate Heron, the former a 
native atid lilc-long resident of this city, who 
vas born in 1S57. A detennination to lead 
rather than to compete, a settled policy of 
iiandling only the best and most reliable i^ooils, 
a uniform system of low prices and siricllv 
iionorable nieihods in the conduct of their 
extensive business have ensured for this rep- 
i-csentalive house the enviable position which 
it occupies today. 

THOMAS SIl.WV, 

Groceries and Provision.s, Cemtr.vi. 

Avenue. 
Esj-yeciiUly prominent among the leading 
^occry and provision houses in this city is the 
well known house now conducted by Mr. 
Thomas Shaw. This representative house 
>ras established in 1S69 by Mr. T.J. Rrtten- 
house, who was succeeded in 1S80 by the firm 
of Simpson & Shaw. In the following year 
^Ir. Shaw became sole proprietor, and under 
his judicious management, the reputation ac- 
<quired during a successt'ul career of more than 
£l"teen years has been fully maintained in everv 
i-es-pect, and anew impetus has been imparted 
to the operations and transactions of this o:d- 
«stablished house. The sale-room, which is 
eligibly and centrally located on Central 
Avenue directly opposite the court house, is 
^2x70 feet in diinensions, and in the rear of 
this is a ware-house 18x35 (^^U used for the 
storage of heavy merchandise and duplicate 
stock in original packages. Mr. Shaw exer- 
cises the keenest discrimination and utmost 
.care in the selection of his stock, aiming at 
-all times to secure the best in every depart- 
ment, and his dealings with customers and 
patrons are characteirzed by unswerving intcg- 
Tity and a strict adherence to facts in all his 
representations. He carries at all times a com- 
plete .and comprehensive assortment of staple 
.and fancy groceries, foreign and domestic 
fruits and vegetables, grocers' sundries, tobac- 
cos, cigars, provisions, and farm and dairy pro- 
-duce received daily direct from producers, and 
.all kinds of table and culinary supplies tor 
honie consumption. The average valuation of 
•stock in the various departments will aggre- 
gate fully "^5,000, and the annual transactions 
of this house will exceed $50,or)o, with a trade 
•derived -not only fi-om the citv, b'lt from adja- 
<X-bX to-n-ns -within a radius of twenty miles. 
Mr. Shaw is a native of Butler County, Ohio, 



where be wa.«r bom in 1829. Durinor the war 
of the rebellion he enlisted in the ranks of the 
Union army in i%2 as a member ofthe i-.^d 
Regiment, I. V. I., and served until 1S65 when 
he received an honorable discharge, after par- 
ticipating in manv of the most memorable 
campaigns and engagements of that eventful 
period of .Vmerican historv. He became a 
reMdent of this city in iS63, and has been for 
several years prominently identified with the 
commercial interests ofthe citv and countv. 



GEORGE BALLE \- SON. 

Mf.r.ch.\xt Tailoks, Central Ave., 

Below Focrth Strf.et. 
In the merch.ant tailoring business of Con- 
nersville, the house of Messrs. George Cille 
iV Son, although by no means the oldest, has 
gained an enviable reputation since it- incep- 
tion in 1SS2, and established its claims to rec- 
ognition in the front ranks of contemporaneous 
establishments, tor its admiralile and fashiona- 
ble fits, superior workmanship, and thorough 
reliability in every respect. This representa- 
tive firm occupies a finely arranged salesroom 
25x40 feet in dimensions for the di-plav of a 
Large and .sea.s<matale stock of piece goods, 
comprising the choicest fabrics of foreign and 
American manufacture for gentlemen's wear, 
fi-om which patrons may make then- selections 
and have elegantand perfect-fittingsnitsmade 
to order, at prices ranging from $20 to $45. 
The latest styles .-ire received direct from im- 
porters and manufacturers, and fashion plates 
from the metropolitan merchant tailors and 
originators of style will alwai s be found on 
exhibition at tliis representative esiabiishment. 
The individual members of the firm, Messrs. 
George and C. A. Balle, are reliable and ener- 
getic ijustness men; and the latter is a practical 
mercliant tailor, wiio exercises a general 
supervision over his department ofthe busi- 
ness, and no garments are permitted to leave 
the establishment that have not been submit- 
ted to his critical examination. 



J. L. BAILEY, 

Gen'er.vl Store, No. 518 Cetsttral 

Avenue. 
Few bu.siness houses in any section of the 
Union at the present d.iy can point to an unin- 
terrupted and successful career e.xtending over 
more than thirty years, and it is extremely 
doubtful if a parallel can be found to the pros- 
perity and long continued commercial entc-r- 
prise inaugurated in this city in 18,2 bv Mr. 
J. L. Bailey. In that year he engaged in the 
.stove and tinware trade, and after two vears, 
started a general store for tlte convenience of 
our then infant municipalitv, and its sparse! v 
populated environs. His present quarters, at 
No. 51S Central avenue, comprise a two-story 
frame srriictui-e, iSxS^. teel in dimensions, 
where he ciu-ries con.st.-mtlv in stock a com- 
plete and comprehensive varietr of genei-al 
merchandise^ including foreign and American 
dry goods, domestics, notions, staple and fancy 
groceries, hats and caps, hoots and shoes, farm 



3(r: 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



and dairy produce, grain, seeds, crockery, glass 
and queens»are,and a great variety of articles, 
such a» are usually I'ound in an establishment 
of this character. The average valuation of 
stock carried ranges from $4,000 to ^S,ooo, and 
the annual transactions aggregate from $15,- 
000 to $jo,ooo. Mr. Bailey, w ho is a native of 
Bucks county, Penn., was born in 1S2;, and 
has- resided in Connersville since 185 J, at which 
time his business career dates in this city. 
Previous to Ids removal to this city, he was 
engaged in mercantile pursuits at TitHn, Ohio, 
and since becoming a resident of this city, has 
been prominently identified with its commer- 
cial and industrial enterprises in a variety of 
ways. He was one of the stock-holders and 
owners in the coffin factory in this city, which 
was destroyed by fire in 1879, and which 
caused the final abandonment of Iheenterprise. 
Theough an active business life, Mr. Bailey 
has evinced an active interest in whatever 
pcoinlsed to promote the thrilt and public 
welfare of this community. 

SHERA & McINTOSH, 

-.:, .Dry Goods, Notions, etc., Claypool's 

i Block, Fifth St. 

;Among the responsible houses of its class, 
tHediy goods house, new conducted by Messrs. 
Stera & .Mcintosh, claims special recognition 
at our hands. Founded originally in iSSo, by 
Mr.-Dan JMiUiken, this house came into the 
possession of its present proprietors in Decem- 
ber, iSSi, and under their energetic and enter- 
prising management its trade has increased 
untildl reaches at the present time from $15,- 
oco to $;o,ooo per annum. The salesroom, 
located in Clay pool block on Fifth street, is 
17150 feet in dimensions, besides basement for 
storage; and the stock, averaging about $7,000 
inrvalue, comprises at all times a choice and 
carefully selected assortment of staple and 
fancy dry goods, dress fabrics of both foreign 
and "American production, woolens, domestics, 
■white goods and house-furnishing supplies, 
gloves, -hosierv, corsets, notions, small wares, 
and miscellaneous merchandise pertaining to 
this special branch ot trade. Their stock is full 
and complete in all departments, and selected 
with great care, especially to meet the require- 
ments of the better class of city and country 
trade; and the tacilities enjoyed by the firm for 
securing all the novelties and desirable styles 
simultaneously with their appearance in the 
markets of the East, enables them to ofler to 
their patrons inducements which cannot fail 
to be appreciated, especially by the ladies of 
Cormersville and vicinity. Mr. James Shera, 
who is a native of the State of Ohio, has 
residej in this citv for the past three years, and 
his partner, Mr. Edwin Mcintosh, is a native 
and life-long resident of Connersville. Both 
members of the firm are thoroughly and prac- 
tically conversant with all the details and 
requirements of the dry-goods trade, and the 
high reputation enjoyed by this house has been 
the legitimate result of their enterprise, ability 
and sagacity in the management of their pros- 



perous business, and their strict adherence to 
the principles of fair and honorable dealing, 
which has characterized their career eince 
engaging in their present business. 

BURK ,.^- MORRIS, 

Groceries, etc., Central Ave. and 

West Fifth St. 
This well known house was originally 
established in 1S71 by Mr. E. W. Burk, who 
conducted the business tor a period of ten 
years, when in 18S1 Mr. G. Morris purchased 
an interest in the business, and the present 
partnership was formed. The premises occu- 
pied for sales and storage purposes embrace a 
two-story brick building ;oxSo feet, and an 
"L" 20.\40 feet in dimensions with commodi- 
ous basements; and the stock, the average 
value of which will re.ich .$6,000, consists of a 
general line of staple and fancy family grocer- 
ies and provisions, grocers sundries generally, 
crockery, queensware and glassware, fruit and 
vegetables in season, farm and dairy produce, 
and all kinds of miscellaneous merchandise, 
such as is usually found in first-ciass metro- 
politan establishments of this character. Pur- 
chasing in large quantities, and direct from 
importers, jobbers, manufacturers and produc- 
ers, this representative firm ofler special 
inducements to their patrons in city and 
country, which cannot be readily duplicated 
by any contemporaneous establishment in this 
section. Mr. E. W. Burk is a native and life- 
long resident of Connersville, and Mr. George 
Morris was born in Ohio, but came to this 
place when quite young, and has been a resi- 
dent in the place for many years. Both mem- 
bers of the firm are thoroughly conversant 
with all the details of the business and the 
requirements of the trade, and the annual 
transactions of the firm at the present time 
will exceed $60,000. 



MARTIN MEYER, 

Harness, Saddles, etc., No. 512 Cen- 
tral Avenue. 
Located at No. 512 Central Avenue is the 
saddlery and harness ware-rooms and manu- 
factory of Mr. .Martin Meyer, which were 
established by thepresententerf rising proprie- 
tor in November 1S7S. His general salesroom 
is kept stocked to its fullest capacity with a fine 
line of single and double harness of his own 
manufacture, saddles, bridles, collars, whips, 
robes, and every variety of horse-clothing and 
equipments and stable supplies. The sales- 
room is 17x60 feet in dimensions, with an 
additional room on the second floor 17x30 feet 
in size, occupied for manufacturing purposes; 
and from seven to twelve experienced hands 
(according to the exigencies of the trade) are 
employed in the production of first-class 
custom work and the manufacture to order of 
hand-made harness of every description, and 
general repairing, etc. Mr. Meyer, who is a 
practical harticss- maker and saddler of many 
years experience, is a native of Germany, 
where he was born in 1S52. He came to this 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



31 



country when but a child, and has been a resi- 
dent of this city I'or tlie past quarter of a cen- 
tury. He learned his trade here, and prior to 
embarkint; in business on his own account, 
was employed as a journeyman, becoming 
thorouglily familiar with all branches and de- 
partments ot the business. 

ANTHONY KEHL, 

Jeweler, Fifth Street. 
Mr. Anthony Kehl whose claims to the title 
of the "Reliable Filth Street Jeweler" are 
based upon a successful and prosperous busi- 
ness career extendin;^ over nearly a quarter of 
a century, characterized by strict integrity and 
honorable dealing, commenced business in this 
city in iS6i upon a comparatively small scale. 
In 1S71 Mr. I. Seller purchased the stock and 
stand and continued the business for three 
years, at the expiration of which time Mr. 
Kehl resumed the management, and since then 
the trade has increa.sed in a ratio of more than 
100 per cent. In iSCiS he erected the building 
which he now occupies on Fifth St., whore, 
in an elegantly arranged and handsomely fitted 
up salesroom, he carries an admirably selected 
assortment of imported and American watches, 
clocks and jewelry, solid silver and heavily 
plated tableware, etc. Special attention is paid 
to fine watch and jewelry repairing by accom- 
plished and experienced workmen, thoroughly 
conversant with the peculiar and delicate 
mechanism of the various styles of watches 
now in the market. Mr. Kehl is a native of 
Baden, Germany, where he was born in 1827; 
he came to the United States in 18^7 and to 
Indiana in the following year, where he has 
since resided; and with the characteristic thrift 
of his race, industry, perseverence and appli- 
cation to his chosen avocation, he has amassed 
a handsome competency, and established a 
lucrative and prosperous trade, as well as an 
enviable reputation as a liberal and enterpris- 
ing merchant. 

JACOB GOODMON, 

General Blacksmithing, Manufac- 
turer OF Farm and Spring Wagons, 
Harrows, Patent Gates, etc., Cen- 
tral Ave. and Third St. 
The general blacksmithing, horseshoeing, 
wagon-making and repair shop of Mr. Jacob 
Goodmon, at the corner of Third Street and 
Central Avenue, was established in 1S65 by its 
present proprietor, who has for nearly twenty 
years transacted the leading business in his 
line in this city. The premises occupied at the 
above named location are S:xi6!; feet in 
dimensions, and live skilled assistants are 
regularly employed in the iron and wood- 
working departments, with four forges in the 
blacksmith department. Mr. Goodmon manu- 
factures the best varieties of farm and spring 
wagons, harrows, patent gates, etc., and devotes 
special attention to horse-shoeing upon scien- 
tific and practical principles, and to general 
blacksmithing in all its departments. Particu- 
lar attention is also paid to repairing agricultu- 



ral tools and implements of everv description, 
and general jobbing in both iron and wood. 
Mr. Goodmon, who has been a resident of 
Indiana since 1S5S, is a thoroughly practical 
and skilled mechanician. 



T. MAFFETT, 

Groceries, Crockerv, etc. 
The every-day requirements of a prosperous 
community like Connersville, with its adjacent 
population in the agricultural districts, fur- 
nishes to the grocery houses of this citv an 
admirable illustration of the application of the 
laws of supply and demand which regulate our 
modern commercial .system. (iroceries are 
absolutely essential to all classes of our citizens 
and the farm and dairy products of the rural 
districts (beyond the amounts required for 
home consumption) are convertible at all times 
into the various articles pertaining to the gro- 
cery line, through the intervention of such 
representative hou.ses as that of T. MatTctt on 
Fifth street, where may be found in great 
variety the best grades of teas, cotVecs, spices, 
sugars, canned goods, and grocers' sundries, 
as well as the choicest products of our farms 
and dairies, in the way of fresh vegetables in 
season, butler, eggs, etc., which, owing to the 
facilities enjoyed tor procurmg supplies, he is 
enabled to oiler to city or country customers 
at the very lowest rates. Mr. MalVett com- 
menced business in 1S67 at his present location, 
where he occupies a commodious and conven- 
iently arranged two-story building 171.,'xSo 
feet in dimensions for business purposes, and 
carries an admirably selected stock of about 
$3,000 in value. His annual sales will compare 
favorably with those of any contemporaneous 
house in this city, and are steadily increasing 
with each succeeding month. Mr. Matlctt, who 
is a native of the State of Pennsylvania, has 
resided in this city since 1S67, at which time 
he embarked in business at his present loca- 
tion, and by his own unaided efforts has estab- 
lished a reputation entitling him to rank 
among the leading and most reliable merchants 
of the city and county. 

H. G. BANES, 

Boots and Shoes, No. 409 Central 
Ave., Opposite Court House. 
It has long been conceded that the greater 
advantages in trade to purchasers is found with 
houses who devote their energies to one par- 
ticular department of trade. These remarks 
are specially applicable to the boot and shoe 
business in which keen discrimination, 
thorough knowledge of values, and an appreci- 
ation of the wants and requirements of cus- 
tomers are absolutely necessary to a successful 
prosecution of the business in an intelligent 
community. These requirements are pos- 
sessed in an eminent degree by Mr. H. G. 
Banes, proprietor of the popular boot and shoe 
emporium at 409 Central Ave., opposite the 
court house, where a salesroom 20x60 feet in 
dimensions with an additional room I2x;afeet 
in size is occupied for business purposes, and 



32 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



a stock carried of fine boots and shoes, selected 
with an express view to tlie requirements of 
the tr^ule in tiiis section. The .valuation ofthe 
ordinary stoclc carried will approximate $7,000, 
and the annual transactions will averatie about 
$2^,000. Mr. Banes commenced business in 
18S1, and by strict attention to business, and 
Tigid adliereiice to the principles of fair and 
honorable dealing has established a steadily 
growing trade among the most substantial 
citizens of city and county. Mr. Banes is a 
native of Kranklin County. Indiana, where he 
was born in 1S4S. He has been a resident of 
■Connersville for the past four years, previous 
to which time he was associated with one of 
the leading boot and shoe houses of Cincin- 
nati for a period of ten years. 

W. H. MILLIKIN, 

Dry Goods, Notion.s, etc.. No. 430 
Centr.nl Avknue. 
In 1S76 Mr. W. H. Millikin, a native of 
Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio, and for many 
years a resident and succe^stul merchant of 
Cincinnati, established in tliis city the well 
Vnown dry goods store at No. 430 Central 
Avenue, which he conducted until his death, 
■which occurred in June, 1SS2, since which 
time tlic house has been carried on by his sur- 
viving wile and his sister — ladies who exercise 
rare discrimination and excellent judginent in 
the selection of stock, and^whosequalilicalions 
are duly appreciated by purchasers. The sales- 
room, which is 20x75 f^'ct in dimensions, is 
centrally and eligibly located, and fitted up in 
an attractive manner in modern metropolitan 
•style; and the stock emnr.ices an elegant and 
seasonable assortment of foreign and Ameri- 
can dry. goods, trimmings, notions, corsets, 
gloves, hosier\' and lathes' furnishing goods, 
selected with an express view to the require- 
ments of the trade in this section. To the 
ladies especially this popular emporiuin offers 
extraordinary inducements in st\le. quiditv 
and prices, and it is safe to assert that no con- 
temporaneous establishment here enjoys better 
facilities tor procuring supplies. The average 
valuation of stock canied is not less than $10.- 
000, and the annual transactions reach an 
aggregate that will compare favorably with 
any similar house in the citv. Five courteous 
and experienced assistants are employed in the 
sales department, and the prominent position 
occupied by this house airvong the commercial 
enterprises of this county, justly entitles it to 
the full and liberal notice here accoided in a 
review ofthe progressive industries and com- 
mercial pursuits of this county and state. 

ADAM SCHOENHOLTZ, 

Grocekiks, Eighth Street and West- 
ern AVEVL E. 
Without opposition or competition in his 
special branch of trade in this section of the 
city within a radius of several squares, Mr. 
Adam Schoenholtz, whose family grocery and 
provision store is located at the corner of 
£ighth Street and Western Avenue, has 



secured a prosperous and steadily increasing 
trade. This liouse was originally established 
in .September 1S7S by Mr. Henry Weisel, and 
came into the possession of its present enter- 
prising proprietor in Octolier 1S82. The prem- 
ises occupied lor sales purposes are 20x('O feet 
in dimensions, and the stock embraces a 
general assortment ofthe clioici st varieties of 
staple and fancy groceries, teas, colfccs, spices, 
sugars, syrups, foreign and domestic fruits, 
canned goods, cigars, tobaccos, notions, pro- 
visions, t'arm and dairy produce, and a great 
variety of articles for table and cooking pur- 
poses. In each department the stock is com- 
plete and varied, and special attention is 
devoted by Mr. Schoenholtz to the selection of 
the purest, iVeshest and best articles for family 
consumption. Mr. -Schoenholiz is a native of 
Germany, born in 1S53, came to America in 
July 1S71, and has been a rcMdent of this 
country for many years. Since embarking in 
business at his present location, he has made 
many friends and influential actpiaintances in 
this section of the city ; and each succeeding 
inonth witnesses a gradual and promising 
increase in the aggregate transactions of this 
popular establishment. 



HUSTON HOUSE, 

E. M. Goodwin', Proprietor, Fourth 
St. and Central Ave. 
To those visiting the city of Connersville, 
whose business or inclination necessitates a 
st.iy of either a longer or shorter period, the 
Huston House, located at the corner of Fourth 
St. and Central Avenue, is cordially com- 
mended. This old and well known house was 
established more than twenty years ago, and 
has been conducted under its present manage- 
ment since May, 18S3, at which time many 
important improvements were introduced, the 
building thoroughly remodeled, painted and 
papered, and newly furnished throughout. It 
has a frontage of 100 feet on each ofthe import- 
ant thoroughfares above mentioned, and con- 
tains, in addition to the otlice, reading room, 
parlors, reception rooms, dining room and 
culinary department, thirty-one finely fur- 
nished and neatly kept sleeping apartments 
and gue>t chambers, together with suitable, 
commodious and well lighted sample rooms 
for the convenience of commercial travelers. 
The dining room, which is located on the first 
floor has a seating capacity for fil'fv persons at 
one time, and the'tables are plentil'ully supplied 
with the choice.-t viands whicli the market 
aft'ords, served in the most attractive and 
appetizing forms iiv polite and courteous 
attendants. Mr. E. NI. Goodwin, the proprie- 
tor is a native and lite-long resident of Indiana, 
and has had many years practical experience 
in the hotel business. He exercises a strict 
personal supervision over all departments of 
the house, and guests may always be assured 
of a cordial greeting and the best of attendance 
during their stay, and no pains will be spared 
by the host or his assistants to render the visit 
of patrons agreeable and pleasant. 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



33 



PARKER & CO., 

Agricultural Implements, Feed, 
ETC., N. E. Cor. Sixth St. and Cen- 
tral Ave. 
One of the leading houses of eastern Indiana 
engaged in this important dep.irtment of trade 
is located on the northenst corner of Sixth 
St. and Central Avenue in the cilv of Con- 
nersville, and conducted b_v the enterprising 
firm of Parker & Co. This house had its in- 
ception in 1S7S, when it was established by 
Mr. R. Marks, and two vears later Mr. John 
Parker purchased an interest in the business, 
when the present firm name and style was 
adopted. The pretnises occupied for sales and 
storaf;e purposes are 35x65 feet in dimensions, 
besides ^'round space; and, in addition to a 
general line of agricultural tnols and imple- 
ments, Messrs. Parker & Co. handle as exclu- 
sive agents in this section, the following well 
known and deserve<lly popular specialties: 
The Dorsev Reaper and Mower, manufactured 
at Milton, Indiana; the Morgan Mower, of 
Monroe, N. Y.; the Hankev Plows, of Dayton, 
Ohio; Gibbs' and Ball's plows, of Canton, 
Ohio; Adams' Chilled Plows, of Plymouth, 
Indiana; the Hopgood sulkies, of Alton, Illin- 
ois; Long iSi Allstetter cutler boxes, of Hamil- 
ton, Ohio; the Wilder cutter boxes, of Mon- 
roe, Michigan; farm wagons, manufactured by 
Mathers Bros., of Anderson, Indiana; pumps 
of the best makes and most approved styles, 
together with a great variety of improved ma- 
chinery and implements. They also make a 
prominent specialty of farm seeds, grains, clo- 
ver and grass seeds, hay, feed, etc. Mr. John 
Parker is a native and life-long resident of 
Indiana, formerly as now engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits; and Mr. R. Marks, his business 
associate and the founder of this house, has 
been identified with the business interests of 
Connersville for the past thirty-two years. He 
was formerly engaged in the manufacturing 
department for a number of years. 

DR. D. RAWLS & CO., 

Druggists, No. 523 Central Ave. 
Among the leading drug houses and pre- 
scription pharmacies of Connersville, and the 
oldest established in Favette County, is that 
located at No. 523 Central avenue, and during 
the past thirty-six years been conducted 
under the firm name and style of Dr. D. 
Rawls & Co. Established more than half a 
century ago, this well-known and thoroughly 
reliable house passed into the possession of 
Dr. Rawls in 1S48, and has since that time 
maintained a high rank among contemporane- 
ous establishments, and in the estimation of 
the medical fraternity throughout this entire 
section, special attention being given to phy- 
sicians' prescriptions, family recipes, and 
pharmaceutical preparations of all kinds, com- 
pounded by the accomplished proprietor and 
his eflicicnt assistants. The premises occu- 
pied at the above named location for sales- 
room, prescription department and laboratory 
are iS.xioo feet in dimensions, and the stock, 



which is full and complete in every depart- 
ment, comprises a general line of the purest 
and freshest drugs and chemicals, proprietary 
medicines, perfumeries, toilet articles, soaps, 
sponges, etc., paints, oils, varnishes, glass, put- 
ty, wines and liquors for medicinal purposes, 
cigars, tobacco and druggists sundries gener- 
ally. Dr. Rawls, who is an educated and 
accomplished physician, chemist and pharma- 
cist, came to this city from Ohio in 1S45, and 
three years later embarked in his present suc- 
cessful business enterprise. He studied medi- 
cine in his native state under the celebrated 
and well-known Dr. Bacon, of Lebanon, and 
was for several years engaged in the practice 
of his profession prior to his removal to this 
city as above noted. He devotes his personal 
attention to the general nianagecncnt and 
supervision of the business, and employs three 
competent assistants in the sales and prescrip- 
tion departments. 

MUNK & ROBERTS FURNITURE 

COMPANY. 
This company was inaugurated in 1S6S by 
Jilr. \Vm. Newkirk and Herman Munk. In 
1S74 the firm became Munk & Roberts, and in 
1SS4 the present company was organized. The 
buildings enibrace a four-storv structure 
60x100 feet, erected in 1S7S, and one five-story 
building 50x140 leet, erected in 1SS3. These 
works manufacture bureaus, stands and cham- 
ber suits, employing about one hundred and 
forty workmen. 



W. W. MICHAEL, 

Groceries axd Ppovisions, South 
Central Avenue and Canal .Sts. 
At the corner of South Central Avenue and 
Canal Street is located the popular family gro- 
cery and provision store of Mr. W. W. Klich- 
ael, which was established by its present 
enterprising proprietor January 22d 1883. The 
salesroom is i6.\3o leet in dimensions, and is 
a tastefully arranged display of the choicest 
varieties of staple and fancy groceries, wliile 
in the rear is a room for storage purposes, etc. 
The stock embraces a general assortment of 
articles for table and culinary purposes, includ- 
ing fine grades of garden-grown teas, cotVees, 
sugars, spices, canned goods, foreign and 
domestic fruits, vegetables, country produce, 
tob.acco, cigars, etc. Mr. Michael makes a 
leading specialty of fresh butter and eggs 
received daily tVom the farms and dairies of 
this and adjoining counties, and is prepared at 
all times to pay the highest market prices, 
either in ca-,h or merchandise, tor all kinds of 
country produce. Mr. Michael is a native of 
this county and State, and was born March 
20th, 1S62. Although yet a young man he has 
had considerable experience in this special 
branch of trade, and possesses business qualifi- 
cations of a high order. Since embarking in 
business on his own account, he has by indus- 
try, enterprise and honor.able dealing, estab- 
lished a local trade which will compare favora- 
bly with that of any of his contemporaries, and 



34 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



one which is steadily increasing with each suc- 
ceeding season. Mr. Michael is employed b_v 
the Indiiina Furniture Manufacturini; Com- 
pany, while the store, durinsj the hours in 
which he is employed, is attended by his 
sister. 

J. M. KELLUM, 

PHOTOGRAriiER. 

At the photographic art gallery of Mr. J. M. 
Kellum mav be seen on exhibition some ad- 
mirable specimens of this interesting and 
beautiful art, which will not sutl-er by compari- 
son with the productions of metropolitan 
establishmehts of a similar class, either east or 
west. Mr. Kellum inaugurated his present 
successful enterpri!>c in 1^83, and has already 
established a lucrative and prosperous trade, 
extending over a wide area of territory adja- 
cent to Connersville, and the work executed 
by him has in every instance given the most 
unqualified satislaction to his numerous pa- 
trons. His reception room, which is fitted up 
in an attractive and appropriate style, is 18x24 
feet in dimensions, and his operating rooms are 
supplied with all the modern appliances and 
appurtenances, enabling him to turn out all 
varieties of pictures, either plain or finished in 
India ink, oil or crayon. He also makes a 
specialty of copying ami enlarging picture^ in 
the highest style of art, and in tiiis special 
line executes some admirable specimens of 
photography. Mr. Kellum is a naliTe and life- 
long resident of this city, and possesses artistic 
abilities of a high order. He keeps fully 
abreast of the times in the various improve- 
ments which have been introdiiced in photog- 
raphy, and by strict attention and application 
to his business, has established an enviable 
reputation as an accompli-hed artist, and his 
establishment is well worthy a visit of inspec- 
tion by all who are interested in CTamining 
■works of art, or desirous of procuring lite-like 
and pleasing pictures of themselves or friends. 

JQHN H. WOOD, 

General Blacksmlthing, East Con- 
nersville. 
The blacksmith and general repair shop of 
Mr. John H. Wood, in the city of Connersville, 
was established by the present proprietor in 
1S69, and for the past fifteen years lias main- 
tained a prominent position. Special attention 
is paid to blacksmlthing of erery description, 
also general repair work, the manut'acture of 
wagons, buggies, carts, harrow and otiier I'arm 
implements. Mr. Wood is a thorough and 
practical blacksmith, devoting his personal 
■attention to the business; thus guaranteeing 
the most prompt attention to all work en- 
trusted to his care, ensuring the utmost satis- 
laction in workmanship and price. Mr. Wood 
who is a native of Kentucky, m ns horn in 1S32, 
but has resided in this county since he was two 
years of age. During the w.-ir ol the rebellion 
lie enlisted in 1S62 in the l6th Indiana Volun- 
teers, and with that regiment participated in 
sotne of the most eventful and memorable 



scenes of that historic period, receiving an 
honorable discharge in 1S64, since which time 
he has been engaged in his present line of 
business. In the extent of business transacted 
and the quality of work turned out, this estab- 
lishment will compare favorably with any 
similar one in this section ol the county. 

JOSEPH KUBLER, 

Gkoceuies and Provisions. 
Eligibly and centrally located at the corner 
of Central Avenue and First St., occupying 
a sales-room 18x40 leet in size, with a base- 
ment of corresponding dimensions, is the 
p<ipular family grocery and provision store of 
Mr. Joseph kubler, which although estab- 
lished as recently as 1SS3, has already secured 
a trade entitling it to a prominent rank among 
its older contemporaries. The stock carried 
by Mr. Kublcr, -rthich is fresh and desirable, 
is selected with an especial view to the require- 
ments ol his trade and comprises a general 
line of choice family groceries and provisions, 
teas, cotfees, spices, su'.^ars, syrups, foreign and 
domestic fruits, tobacco and cigars, canned 
goods and miscellaneous merLhandise pertain- 
ing to this speci.d branch of trade. The stock 
is daily replenished by fresh arrivals Irom im- 
porters, jobbers, manufacturers and i)roducers, 
and the prices are unitormly the lowe.st con- 
sistent with the quality of the goods offered. 
The trade of this house, which is derived from 
both city and country, has steadily increased 
since its inception, and each succeeding month 
witnesses a most gratifying increase ot busi- 
ness. Mr. Kubler, vyho is a native of Switzer- 
land, was born in 1S50, and came to this 
country wtien but four years of age. He first 
engaged in business on his own account in this 
city, and by a strict adherence to the correct 
principles of mercantile honor and fair and 
honorable dealing, has built up his present 
prosperous and lucrative business, and earned 
an enviable reputation as a conscientious and 
upright merchant, whose representations will 
always be found to accord strictly with the 
facts. 

JOHN J. PETERS, 

Meat Market, P'ifth St. 
The favorite meat market of Mr. John J. 
Peters on Filth street, although established as 
recently as in July 1SS3, has already become 
deservedly popular with the house- keeper.^ in 
this section of the city, and receives a liberal 
and encouraging patronage from the better 
class of trade. The salesroom, which is 15x30 
feet in dimensions, is neatly and appropriately 
furnished with all the modern conveniences, 
including a tine refrigerator tor the preserva- 
tion of meat during the warm season. Two 
assistants are eniplo\ed, and the tr.ide at the 
present time requires not less than twenty-five 
head ol cattle per month, with a proportionate 
number of smaller aniinals — such as hogs, 
calves, sheep, etc. Mr. Peters makes a specialty 
of supplying to families the choicest cuts of 
fresh beef, pork, veal, lamb, mutton, etc., and 






CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



1792716 

35 



all kinds of cured and smoked meats, sausage, 
bologna, head cheese and sirniUir articles ol'his 
own manufactiire. Mr. Peters, who was born 
in Germany in 1S49, has been a resident ot this 
State since 1S67, and is practically conversant 
with the business in wiiich he has embarked, 
under the most favorable auspices. By lair 
and honorable dealing with his patrons, by 
strict attention to his business and the require- 
ments of the trade, and a determination to keep 
the best articles in his line, he has established 
a prosperous and steadily increasing trade in 
this city and adjacent territory. 



JACOB KRIBS, 

Merchant Tailor, Central Ave. axd 

Sixth St. 
A practical experience of more than thirty 
years as a cutter and artistic designer of gen- 
tlemen's garments enables Mr. Jacob Kribs to 
guarantee to his patrons and friends in this 
section that perfection of tit and finish, which 
is at the present time so essential to the per- 
sonal appo;u-ance of those who desire to create 
a favorable impression in society or in business 
circles. His popular establishment, located 
at the corner of Central Avenue and Sixth 
Street, now in the fourth year of a prosperous 
existence, occupies a lloor space of 18x45 feet 
for the display of an admirably selected stock 
of textile fabrics for gentlemen's wear, embrac- 
ing the choicest products of English, French 
and American looms, in cloths, cassimeies, 
vestings, suitings, etc., from which customers 
may make their selections and have full dress 
or business suits made up to order in the most 
elegant, thoiough and workmanlike manner, 
at prices ranging from $;o to $45. His .selec- 
tion of piece goods is made with a special view 
to the requirements of the better class of trade 
in this section, and will always be found to 
comprise the most fashionable, durable, and 
seasonable goods in their respective lines, and 
the latest novelties in metropolitan fashions, 
as well as ti.e individual tastes and inclina- 
tions of his patrons are consulted in the manu- 
facture of suits or single garments. Mr. Kribs 
is a native of the province of Alsace, but has 
been lor many years a resident of this countrv. 
During the war of the rebellion he enlisted 
in 1S64 as a member of the i6th Indiana 
Mounted Infantry, Colonel Connover, in Capt. 
Macklin's Company (K), and as a member ol 
the regimental band, served tor eleven months, 
receiving an honorable discharge at New 
Orleans, La., in 1S65. 

WM. HEEB, 

Wagon and Repair Shop. 
For nearly half a century, the family name 
ofHetbhas been familiar to the residents of 
Connersville and vicinity, in connection with 
the wagon-making business; the well known 
manufactory and general repair shop now con- 
ducted by Mr. Wm. Heeb, having been estab- 
lished by his father early in 1S44, and passing 
into the possession of the present proprietor 
and his brother in 1S63, and continued as such 



tor two years, when the present owner took 
entire charge of the business. Mr. Heeb oc- 
cupies for manufacturing and repair work a 
Irame structure 20x90 feet in dimensions, and 
enjoy> the best facilities for manufacturing to 
order all descriptions of farm and light wagons, 
carts, etc., using only the best materials and 
employing skilled and experienced assistants. 
He makes a leading specialty of repairing and 
general jobbing in both the iron and wood- 
working departments, and guarantees all work 
turned out at his establishment to give perfect 
satisfaction as to material, workmanship and 
price. Mr. Heeb is a native of Germany, and 
was born near tlie city of Mentz in 1S36. He 
came to this countrv with his parents in 1S43, 
and located in this city, where lie learned the 
trade of wagon-maker with his father, and em- 
barked in business on his owm account as above 
noled. In ilSyS he was elected to the citv 
council, in which body he served continuously 
and acceptably to his constituents lor 4 years. 

PHIL. JOSEPH, 

Dry Goods, Notions, Carpets and 

Millinery Goods. 
The inducements ofiered to purchasers of 
dry goods, notions, carpets, etc., at the popular 
emporium of Mr. Phil. Joseph on Fifth St. are 
of such a pronounctd character as to elirit the 
most favorable commendations. Mr. Joseph 
commenced business in this city in 1S81, and, 
while his first year's transactions reached only 
about $10,000, his tmde slcadlly increased un- 
til for the year 1&S3 his sales aggregated nearlv 
double that amount, and indications point to a 
proportionate increase for the current year. 
His salesroom is 40x50 feet in dimensions, 
fitted up and arranged in modern metropolitan 
style, and twelve assistants are regularly em- 
ployed in the sales department. The stock 
einbraces a general line of foreign and Ameri- 
can dry goods, domestics, woolens, white 
goods, linens, dress fabrics, trimmings, notions, 
ladies and gentlemen's furnishing goods, mil- 
linery goods, small wares, carpets and miscel- 
laneous merchandise legitimatelv pertaining 
to this special department of trade. Mr. Joseph 
purchases in large lots and for cash, directly 
from importers, jobbers and manufacturers in 
the principal trade centres and pioducing dis- 
tricts of the Union: and in addition to his 
extensive line of staple goods, receives the 
latest novelties and styles simulloneouslv with 
their appearance in metropolitan I'a-hionable 
circles. Mr. Joseph, who is a native of the 
state of Kentucky, was born in 1S5S, and has 
been for the greater portion of his liie engaged 
in mercantile pursuits in other localities, 
becoming a resident of Indiana three years 
ago, at which time his present enterprise was 
maugurated. Mr. Joseph now occupies two 
salesrooms as described in the article, but 
expects, during the coming spring to erect a 
fine business block near his present store, 
which will afford facilities for liis increasing 
trade, and in its architectural appearance will 
be a credit to the city. 



arTczcTi^ 



36 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



M. H. O'TOdLE, 

Makble ani> Granite Monuments, 
AND Practual Surveyor, Sol'i h Side 
OF FoiRTH St., West of Central 
Avenue. 
The business operations of this house in this 
city dates its origin to 1S57, at which time Mr. 
O'Toole started in the marble Inisiness, with 
his shop tlien located in tlie building which 
has since become known as the old stocking 
manufactory building. At that time the popu- 
lation was less than half its present number of 
inhabitants, and contained not more than one- 
third of the number of business houses. In 
1S6S Mr. O'Toole took ]ins>ession of his pres- 
ent location, and in 1671 erected his present 
business room and shop. During the years of 
his associalion here wilh the growth and pros- 
perity of this communitv, >ir. O'Toole has 
erected a large proportion of the monuments 
and tombstones to be found in oui" cemeterv 
in this city and the burying grounds in various 
sections of this county. He gives his personal 
attention to supplving, upon the most reasona- 
ble terms, marble or granite monuments, 
tombstones or slabs, and is prepared to execute 
in the most artistic manner, line monuments 
or stone work from original design.s or ol 
standard styles. Mr. O'Toole is also a prac- 
tical civil engineer, and th6 large experience 
he has enjoyed in this department will, in 
many instances, make demands upon his ser- 
vices. He is a native of Scotland, where he 
was born in 1S26. His parents were of Irish 
descent, and he subsequently learned his pres- 
ent trade in the county of Wick low, Ireland, 
coming to this country in iSsi. Alter working 
at the marble business in Brooklyn and New- 
York, he was subsequently employed as civil 
engineer on the railroad, (now controlled bv 
the Pennsylvania Company) putting in all the 
grade stakes from that place to Gittanninc 
Point, at the foot of the Alleghenys. After- 
ward he worked in Pittsburg as chief engineer, 
subsequently rcmovmg to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
from which he came to this city as above mdi- 
cated. He employs an eight horse-power 
engine and boiler, with special improved ma- 
chinery for the cutting of stone to any desired 
dimensions — the only one in the county. 

JAMES McCANN, 

Groceries, Provisions, Dry Goods, 
Boots, Shoes, Notions, Etc., East Con- 

NERSVILI.E, InD. 

The grocery and provision house now con- 
ducted by Mr. James McCann, at East Con- 
nersville, was originally established bv B. 
McCann & Son in 1S72. This partnership 
remained in force until 1S7S, when the senior 
member of the original firm retired, and since 
that time the business has been successfully 
prosecuted by its present enterprising proprie- 
tor, who occupies for sales and storage pur- 
poses two tloors and basement, each 20x40 teet 
in dimensions, carrying a large and carefully 
selected stock of staple and fancy family gro- 
ceries, fruits, vegetables, canned goods," farm 



and dairy produce, provisions, table and culin- 
ary supplies. This is the leading house of its 
class in this section of the city; its transactions 
will compare favorably with' older and more 
pretentious houses. Mr. B. McCann, one of 
the original founders of the house, and father 
of the present owner of this well. known house 
is a native and life-long resilient of this county 
and is one of our oldest and most highly res- 
pected citizens. He has been prominently 
identified with the business interests and ma- 
terial prosperity of the city and state for nearlv 
half a century, and has occupied the honorable 
and responsible position of Justice of the 
Peace for the p^ist fourteen years. Mr. James 
McCann was born in this city in 1840, and 
during his merc.mtile career has established 
an enviable reputation for integrity and hon- 
orable dealing, which has ensured for him an 
established and lucrative trade, extending 
throughout this city and adjoining towns. 

ELLIS & McFARLAX. 

Livery, Feed and S.vle Stable, Fifth 

Street. 
For nearly a quarter of a century the popu- 
lar livery, feed and sale stables on Fifth St. 
have been a familiar landmark to the residents 
of Connersville and visitors to the city, having 
been established in 1S60 by Capt. W. J. 
Orr. Smce disposing of his interest in the 
business, Capt. Orr has been succeeded bv the 
following named individuals and firms iii the 
order herewith given: Moses Long, Edward 
Stone, William -Middlelon, J. W. Sample, C. 
C. Sample, and by Mr. H. T. Ellis in [aunarv 
1SS3, who conducted the business alone until 
18S2, when Mr. J. K. McFarlan was admitted 
to an interest in the business. The buildings 
occupied for stable purposes have a frontage 
of sixty-two feet on Filth St. -with a depth of 
one hundred feet and are fitted up with all the 
modern conveniences, with ample canacitv for 
the accommodatian of one hundred iiorses at 
one time. Special attention is paid to the 
■want s and requirements of traveling men, in 
furnishing suitable conveyances of all descrip- 
tions, with or without experienced drivers, and 
upon the most favorable and reasonable terms. 
They keep tVom fifteen to twenty fine horses 
for livery purposes, with a choice selection of 
new and stylish buggies, carriages, and single 
and double vehicles for business or pleasure 
purposes. They also make a specialty of 
boarding horses by the day or week, and parties 
visiting the city by their own conveyances can 
have their teams properh- cared for by com- 
petent and experienced hostlers. The advant- 
ages and f.icilities enjoyed by this well known 
firm are not surpassed by tliose of any similar 
establishment in this section. Messrs. Ellis & 
McFarlan are both natives and life long resi- 
dents of this state and are thoroughly familiar, 
and practically conversant with the business 
in which they are engaged, being thorough 
judges of value in horse flesh, and gentlemen 
whose representations under all circumstances 
may be implicitly relied upon. 



CITY OF CONNERSVILLE. 



37 



C. C. ACKERMAN, 

Jeweler, No. 51S Central Ave. 
The old established jeueliy hou-ie of Mr. C. 
C. Ackerman, on Central avenue, claims con- 
spicuous recognition as among the representa- 
tive business houses of Connersville, and an 
important factor in its commercial thriit. Es- 
tablished b_v its present proprietor in 1S69, this 
house has maintained during tlie past fifteen 
vears an unblemished reputation for reliability, 
integrity and honorable dealing, which has 
ensured for it a lucrative and established trade 
with the better class of citizens in both citv and 
country. The salesroom which is 15x60 feet 
in dimensions is fitted up in modern style, and 
the stock carried embraces an elegant assort. 
ment ot imported and American watches ofthe 
best makes, a fine line of gold and heavily 
plated jewelry, clocks, solid silver and plateii- 
table-ware, fine spectacles and eve-glasses, and 
a great variety of u-eful and ornamental 
articles, such as are usually found in first-class 
metropolitan establishments of this descrip- 
tion. Special attention is paid to fine watch 
and jewelry re|i.uiiiig in all its branches, and 
parties entrusting their time-keepers to Mr. 
Ackerman may coniidetitly re^t assui'ed that 
they will be properly cleaned, regulated atid 
adjusted, and perfect ^aIisfaction guaranteed. 
Mr. Ackerman is a native ofthe Slate of Penn- 
sylvania, and was born in 1S37. He is an old 
resident of Indiana, and a praetical jeweler and 
watch-maker of more than twentv-five vears 
experience— thoroughly familiar with aU the 
details of the business which engages his 
attention, and in which he has met witti such 
a gratifying degree of success. 

MURPHY BROS., 

Groceries, Cor. Fifth and Eastern 

Avenue. 
Nearly a quarter of a century has elapsed 
since Messrs. Buckley iV Ross commenced 
business in this city in the grocery line, from 
which the present store derived its origin. In 
iSf4 this partnership was dissolved and Mr. 
Buckley conducted the business alone until 
1SS3, when the firm of Murphy Bros, took 
possession of this old and well known stand, 
and, under their energetic administration, tiie 
high reputation gained by Mr. Buckley during 
the past twenty years has not only been main- 
tained, but new lite and energy' in t'used into 
the business; and notwithstanding the fact that 
numerous other houses have come into exist- 
ence, and to a certain extent divided the trade, 
the transactions of this representative house 
will compare favorably with those of any of its 
contemporaries in this section. Messrs'. Mur- 1 
phy Bros, occupy one floor 25x60 feet in I 
dimensions, where they carry an admirably j 
selected stock and complete assortment ol the 
best grades of staple and fancy groceries, tea.-, 
coffees, caimed goods, fruits,"vcgetables, pro- 
visions, farm and dairy produce, queens and j 
glassware, tobacco, cigars, notions, etc. Tlieir 
merchandise is new, fresh and pure, and com- 
prises at all times the choicest goods in the | 



market, «nd it is the determination of this firm, 
as expressed in the motto thev have adopted, 
to "Please and accommodate all classes of trade 
alike." Both members of the tirm, .Messrs. 
AVilliam and John Murphy, are natives and 
life-long residents of Indiana, and have had an 
extended experience in the grocery trade. In 
all their transactions their de dings .are charac- 
terized by a spirit of liberality and honorable 
dealing which cannot fail to ensure them a 
liberal share ofthe general trade from the resi- 
dents of the city and country. 

DICKEY & CO., 

Manli'rs. of Carts and Buckuoards, 
Third St., Between Central Ave- 
NLE and Eastern Avenue. 
In order that a clear idea ofthe advantages 
presented in the products of this enterprising 
firm may be more clearly understood, we ap- 
pend a briel' description of this house from its 
origin to the jiresent time. The business was 
originally started as a repair shop bv Messrs. 
Dickey i; Applegate in iSSo, which firm was 
dissolved the following vear. Mr. Dickcv 
continued the business up to February iSS';, 
and having received a patent from the United 
States Government, dated March 27th, iSS,^, 
upon improvement in carts, he soon afterward 
entered into partnership with John W. Grout 
for the manufacture of this article, and the 
associated interests.- This partnershio ended 
in the burning ofthe premises located on the 
south side of Fifth St , .May 26tli, 1SS3, in a 
manner which reliected great discredit upon 
his partner, who subsequently decamped with 
the msurance money, compelling Mr. Dickt v 
to again rely upon his own well-earned repu- 
tation for honor and integrity for his future 
ojierations. In July of the present year, tJie 
present company was elVected, and ample 
premises secured for present operations on 
Third St., where special attention is given to 
the manuliicture of carts and buekboards, and 
to all kmds of general job-work and repairing-, 
both in wood and ir<m work, painting, etc. 
relating to the general carriage manufacturing 
business. The principal features of his patent 
on carts consists in the peculiar shape of the 
shall by which the motion of the horse is so 
tar lost in its eti'ect upon the seat as to he 
scarcely perceptible, and also in the adjustment 
of the bar, regulating the weight held in the 
seat, and the convenience of getting into and 
out ofthe vehicle. These features cannot f.iil 
to commend the products of this company to 
all usmg or desiring to purchase this class of 
vehicle. Mr. Dickey has also invented an 
imi-TOved spring for buekboards, which has 
many advantages over anything in the market, 
tor which he has applied 'for a patent. Mr. A. 
H. Dickey, tlie senior member of this firm is 
a native of this place, in which he was born in 
1836. He learned his trade with Mr. John 
Applegate in Rush County, and subsequently 
worked at his trade in various sections of this 
and other states, up to the time of commencing 
business here as above noted. Mr. M. Hart- 



38 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



7ell, the junior member of the firm, is a native 
of Northampton County, Penn'a, where he 
■was born in 1S56 He came west with his 
parents when quite vountr. and learned the 
trade of blacksmitliing at Hope, Bartholomew 
County, with his fatlier, Mr. Geo. W Harlzell, 
after which he worked at various places up to 
the time of forming present partnership. This 
firm keep finished work on hand and are pre- 
pared to execute work to order, guaranteiing 
good stock and lirstclass workmanship in every 
particular. 

INDIANA FURNITL'RE MANUFAC- 
TURING CO. 
This company was organized in 1875, 
•with a capital stock of $50,000, subsequently 
increased to $ico,ooo, for the manulacture ot 
walnut, asli, and poplar French dressing sets, 
bureaus, bedsteads, wash-stands, etc. The 
premises occupied for manufai-turinL; purposes 
embrace several substantial structures, and 
employment is given to about one hundred 
and forty workmen. \Vm. Newkirk is presi- 
dent, and Geo. M. Sinks, secretary and treas- 
urer. 

HENRY RIEMAN, 

Florist and G.\rdener, North Cen- 
tral AVE.NUE. 
The leading establishment in this section of 
the State devoted to the cultivation of plants, 
flowers, etc., and to gardening in all its 
branches, is that conducted by Henry Rieman 
on North Central Avenue, whose extensive 
and admirably arranged' grounds in the high- 
est state of scientific cultivation, cover an area 
of six and three- fourth acres. Upon these 
grounds are erected two green houses 10x40 
feet in size, and one -5x40 feet, while not less 
than 6,000 square feet of sash are employed 
for hot beds; seed beds, and prop.igating and 
forcing purposes. Mr. Henry Rienian and his 
son Charles, both of whom are jiractical and 
experienced florists and landscape gardeners, 
devote their personal attention to the manage- 
ment and general supervi-iun of their exten- 
sive business, and employ four competent 
assistants. This business was established by 
the present proprietor about ten years ago, and 
from a comparatively moderate commence- 
ment, has attained its present gratifying pro- 
portions through the efforts, enterprise and 
ability manifested by the gentlemen above 
named. Parties desiring plants, shrubs or 
flowers of anv description appropriate to this 
climate, will find them at this establishment 
at the most reasonable rates, and those wish- 
ing their gardens, grounds or lawns laid out in 
artistic style are cordially commended to the 
Messrs. Rieman as accomplished and scientific 
landscape gardeners. This house is also pre- 
pared to furnish, at the shortest notice, clioice 
boqucts, floral decorations and cut flowers for 
festive occasions or for funerals, in any desired 
quantity or form. Mr. Henry Rieman is a native 
of Germany, but has resided in this country for 
more than twenty years. He was educated to 



this business in the Fatherland, «nd has fol- 
lowed it uninterruptedly since coming to 
America. Prerious to his removal to this city, 
he conducted a similar establishment at Ox- 
ford, Ohio. He is ably assisted in his present 
establishment by his son, Mr. Charles Rieman, 
who is also a practical florist and landscape 
gardener, and who is active in the manage- 
ment of the gardens and general business above 
described. 

GEO. LOEPER & SON, 

Carriaof.s, BuGGiKS, Etc, Hlsiox 
Hotel Ulock; MASUFAcroRY at ]"air- 
FiKLi), Franklik Co., Ind. 
The carriage repository and ware-rooms 
located in the Huston Hotel block, one of the 
numerous branches of the extensive carriage 
works of Messrs. Geo. Loeper i: Son at Fair- 
field in this state, were established in this city 
in 1S77. The branch in this city being under 
the supervision of Mr. D. H. Millikin. The 
stock carried at these commodious ware-rooms 
comprises a fine assortment of carriages, bug- 
gies, road wagons and wheeled vehicles in a 
great variety of styles, manufactured from the 
best material and guaranteed to tie fidlv equal, 
if not superior in quality, st\le, durability' and 
finish to those of any similar contemporaneous 
establishment in the country. The mainoflice, 
factory and general headquarters of this repre- 
sentative firm are located at Fairfield, Indiana, 
where imexceptional facilities are enjoyed for 
the production of the best varieties of car- 
riages, and an a\'erage of about three hundred 
finished jobs of the various patterns are turned 
out annually. In addition to the repository in 
this city, branch houses for the convenience of 
customers, have been established at Brook- 
ville, Intliana, Liberty, Indiana, and Hamilton, 
Ohio, each of which are under the general 
direction of the members of the firm, and the 
immediate supervision of experienced and 
efficient managers. Mr. Geo. Loeper, the 
senior memWer of the old established firm, is a 
native of Franklin County, Indiana. He is an 
experienced carriage manufacturer, having 
established the factory and works at Fairfield 
on a comparatively small scale nearly a third 
of a century ago. His son and business asso- 
ciate, Mr. Lewis Loeper, was also born in 
Franklin County, and was educated to the 
business in his father's c-tablishment, becom- 
ing a member of the firm in iSSi. 

G. WOOD, 

Wagon" and Blacksmith Shop, Sixth 
St. 
The wagon and blacksmith shop ofMr. G. 

Wood was first established in this city, nearly 
opposite its present location, in 1^62, where the 
business was conducted for five years upon a 
comparatively small scale. In 1S67 Mr. Wood 
remored to his present quarters on Sixth St. 
between Central Avenue and the railroad, 
where he occupies a frame building 3ox.io feet 
in dimensions for general blacksmitliing, 
■wagon-making and repairing in all branches 



CITY OF COKNERSVILLE. 



39 



and departments of iron work. He devotes his 
personal attention to the gtneral supervision of 
the bu^iness, and employs two skilled and ex- 
perienced workmen, giving special attention to 
horseshoeing, repairing and general jobbing. 
Mr. Wood if. a native of Fayette County, Ind., 
where he was horn in 1S33, and for almost his 
entire life has been arcjitlent oftliis city. He 
has been three times elected by his fellow-citi- 
zens as a member of the city council, in which 
capacity he has given the most unqualified 
satisfaction to his constituents, and won the 
esteem of all with whom he has been associated 
in public or private life, and few men enjoy a 
wider reputation in this section. 

CITIZENS BANK. 

This is one of the inost iinportant financial 
concerns of this section, and was established 
in 1S70 by Wm. Huston and others asa private 
bank. Wm. Huston died in 1875, and his son, 
J. N. Hu.--ton became sole proprietor by pur- 
chasing interests ot other partners. A general 
banking business is transacted. A brief sketch 
of the head of this institution will be found in 
connection with the article on the Western 
Hosiery Mills on another page. 

T. F. THOMAS, 

Livery, Feei> and S.\le Stadle.s, and 
Ge.nf.ral Undertaking, Nos. 513 and 
515 Central AvENVE. 
The well known livery, feed and sale stables 
now conducted by Mr. T. F. Thomas, on Cen- 
tral Avenue, were originally established by 
Mr. Wm. Bunnell nearly a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago. His immediate sticcessors were 
Messrs. Greer iS; Tappin, and then Greer iSc 
Thomas. In 1S7S Mr. Thoinas purchased the 
interest of Mr. Greer in the establishment, and 
conducted the business alone for about two 
years, when he disposed of the stand to Mr. 
Stephen Parry. Two years later he again 
became sole proprietor, and ui,ider his judicious 
administration the business has assumed pro- 
portions of considerable magnitude. The 
stables, which are substantially built, and con- 
veniently arranged, with ample accommoda- 
tions for one hundred head of horses, cover a 
ground space of 5^x150 feet. Twelve fine 
horses are ordinariiv kept tor livery purposes, 
with numerous stvlish carriages, buggies, road- 
wagons, etc., to let upon the most reasonable 
terms for business or pleasure trips; while 
special attention is paid to t'urnishing appro- 
priate turn-outs for funeral occasions. Mr. 
Thomas also makes a prominent specialty of 
buying and selling horses, mules and stock, 
and has the very best tacilities for boarding 
horses by the day or week. In addition to his 
extensive interests in this line, he conducts a 
general undertaking and embalming business, 
with an olfice at Mover's furniture store. No. 
507 Central Avenue, where he carries con- 
stantly in stock a lull line of colKns, caskets, 
burial cases, robes, etc., and is now prepared 
to undertake the entire management of t'uner- 
als in accordance with the wishes of friendsof 



the deceased, or with the rites and ceremonies 
of the different religious denominations or 
secret societies. He devotes especial attention 
to embalming bodies by the inost appro\ed 
processes known to modern scienie. Mr. 
Thomas is a native and lifelong resident of 
Indiana, and was born in 1S57. 



G. S. PRATT, 

Boots and Shoes, No. 320 Central 

Avenue. 
It is only bv patronizing established houses 
of acknowledged reliabilitv, and those inaking 
an exclusive specialty of this iinportant branch 
of trade that customers can be absolutely cer- 
tain of procuring the best goods at tlie most 
reasonable prices. A representative house of 
this class, which has for years maiiuained an 
unsullied reputation, is that of Mr. G. P. 
Pratt at No. 3J0 Central Avenue, where in the 
coinmodious two story brick building, an 
aggregate tioor space 0^24x160 feet in aiea is 
occujiied for sales, nianufacturing and storage 
purposes. Mr. Pratt commenced at this loca- 
tion with his brother in 1S72, and for the past 
seven years has conducted the house alone, 
transacting an annual liusiness of luore than 
$30,000. His stock, which is selected with 
great care tVom the unbroken lines of the lead, 
ing manulacturers of the Union is valued at 
not less than $14,000, and embraces a fine 
variety and complete assortment ot fine and 
common boots and shoes for ladies' and gentle- 
men's, youths and children's wear, especially 
adapted to the requirements of the trade. Fine 
custom work is a prominent specialty of this 
representative house, and perfect fits, superior 
workinanship, and first-class material are 
special features of all goods manutactured 
here. Mr. Pratt is a native of Albany County, 
N. Y., where he was born in 1S32. He has 
resided in this city since 1S62, and has for 
nearly a quarter ota century been prominently 
identified with this special department of our 
coirimercial and industrial enterprises. Mr. 
Pratt also deals extensively in wool during the 
season, generally shipping to Eastern markets. 

A. C. COOLEY, 

Furniture and Undertaking, No. 

524 Central Avenue. 
Mr. A. C. Coolev, proprietor of the furniture 
and undertaking establishment at No. 524 
Central Avenue, is a native of New York 
State where he was born in 1S12. He came to 
this state when but nine years of age, and has 
resided in Connersvillc since 1S46. He com- 
menced business in this city in the following 
year as a dealer in furniture, and in 1S65 
engaged in the manufacturing business, in 
which he remained imtil 1S74, when he dis- 
posed of his interest in that department, and 
since that time has devoted his attention exclu- 
sively to the retail furniture and general under- 
taking business. He occupies a twostory 
frame structure 18x93 feet in dimensions nt 
the location above designated, carrying a gen- 
eral line of fine upholstered and common 



40 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



furniture, including parlor, drawing-room and 
chamber sets, dining-room and kitchen furni- 
ture, and makes a specialty of undert.iking in 
all its branches. His stock in this line em- 
braces metalic burial caskets, cotHns, shrouds, 
etc., and he is prep.Tred at aU times to under- 
take the management of luncral obsequies in 
accordance with the forms prescribed b_v dif- 
ferent religious denominations, secret and 
benevolent societies, or the private wishes of 
friends of the deceased. }lis long experience 
in all departments of the business in which he 
is engaged is a sufficient guarantee of his 
thorough ability and reliability in all matters 
entrusted to his care which will always receive 
his prompt personal attention. 

I. B. YOUNG, 

Books, Stationery, Etc. 
With a thoroughly practical and compre- 
hensive knowledge of all departments of the 
business in which he is engaged, acquired 
during an experience of more than fourteen 
years as a dealer in books, stationery, etc. 
Mr. I. B. Young, in January iS?4, purchased 
the stock, stand, fixtures and good will of the 
well known book store in Connersville, which 
had been founded in 1S72 by Mr. R. T. Curry, 
and assumerl the management of this well 
established business, infusing new lite and 
energy into its ditlerent departments, and 
adding greater variety to its already desirable 
assortment. Mr. Young occupies the first- 
floor and basement each :ox6o leet in dimen- 
sions of a substantial brick building on Central 
Avenue, for general sales purposes, and a 
ware house 15X1S feet in dimensions for the 
storage of original packages and duplicate 
stock. He carries at all times a desirable and 
attractive assortment of school and miscellane- 
ous books, embracing the standard publica- 
tions in history, biography, poetry and fiction, 
together with a choice assortment of the popu- 
lar liter.iture of the day, fine stationery, blank 
books, etc., wail papers, curtains and window 
shades, and miscellaneous merchandise per- 
taining to this special department of trade 
ordinarily classified under the generic term of 
stationers' sundries. The average valuation of 
stock carried ranges from S6,oooto $7,000, and 
the annual transactions of this representative 
house will closely approximate $20,000. By 
special arrangements with the leading publish- 
ers and dealers, Mr. Young is enabled to sup- 
ply at short notice either foreign or American 
books at publishers' prices, and volumes not 
carried in stock will be procured for patrons, 
upon the most advantageous terms. He also 
makes a specialtv of commercial, legal, school 
and fine stationery of everv description, and 
his stock in thi> department will compare 
favorably with that of any contemporaneous 
establishment of the kind" in the large cities 
east or west. Mr. Young is a native of Preble 
County, Ohio, and was born in 1S49. He came 
to this city November 27th, 1SS3, previous to 
which time he had been engaged in the book 
business for fourteen years at Eaton, Ohio. 



GEORGE HEEB, 

W.^GON .\ND Repair Shop. 

The manufacture of buggies, wagons, carts, 
wheel barrows, revolving rakes, etc., as con- 
ducted by Mr. George Heeb, in connection 
with general loblnng and repair work, is one of 
the local industries of Connersville, which 
cannot be overlooked in the present historical 
review of our representative establishiuents in 
the difierent departments of trade. Mr. Heeb's 
shop, which is a one-story frame building 
18x30 feet in dimensions, is situated on bixth 
St., between Central Avenue and the railroad, 
where he commenced bu^iness on his own 
account in iSSo, and has built up a prosperous 
and lucrative trade, derived from both city and 
adjoining towns. He devotes his personal 
attention to the business, and whether in the 
production of new work or in the repairing 
and jobbing departments, uses only the best 
material and guarantees all work performed 
by him to be thorough, reliable and satisfac- 
tory. Mr. Heeb is a native of Germany, where 
he was born in 1S41. He came to this coun- 
try with his parents when but live or six years 
of age. and has resided in Connersville for the 
past thirty-seven years. He is a thorough 
mechanic and practical carriage builder, who 
is familiar with all branches of the business. 



CONNERSVILLE BUGGY CO., 
Manl'f'rs. Buckhoards, Etc. 
This company was incorporated in 1SS3 with 
a capital stock of .$20,000. Commodious build- 
ings are occupied and a force of fiftv men em- 
ployed. The company make a specialty of this 
line, and turn out large quantities of the 
vehicles. The otlicers are, J. N. Huston, presi- 
dent; L. T. Bower, secretary , J. D. Lamed, 
treasurer, and John Pohlman, superintendent. 



COOLEY— MORRISON FURNITURE 
MANUFACTURING ASSOCIATION. 

This establishment was originally organized 
as Cooley, Morrison & Co. in iS56, but has 
operated under the present firm name since 
1S74. They occupy several buildings of va- 
rious sizes for the manufacture of walnut and 
ash bureaus, dressers and stands, giving em- 
plovment to about one hundred workmen. 
Curtis Wright is president, and F.J. Ritten- 
house secretary and treasurer. 

Other firms doing business here not already 
mentioned, are: Ellis & Serodino, hardware; 
M.J. Frankel, dry goods; \V. T. Galbraith i: 
Co., drugs; A. Morrow, hats and caps ; J. M. 
Shaefer, boots and shoes; M. E. Woolsey, 
drugs; C. W. Cook, confectionery ; Keller I'c 
Co., clothing; J. Mulheeren, baker; Tatman i: 
Cooley, piiotographs; Snider & PtaelHin, 
cigars; J. S. Mills, groceries; Keller A. Uhle, 
flour; Holberg A: Co., clothing; J. F. Gentry, 
livery; M. H. Updegraph, harness; Griilith'i: 
Co., hardware; G. W. Brown, lumber; Bar- 
rows & Co., coal and wood; Win. Ready, hats 
and caps; Turkenkoph Bros., cigars; F. Scho- 
enholtz, baker; F. M. Gipe, confectionery. 



FAYETTEVILLE. 



This place has long been among the 
most imj)ortant trade centers in Fayette 
County outside the county seat. Among 
the early f-ettlers may be noticed Mr. 
Triplett Lockhart, who came to this sec- 
tion and "camped out" as early as 1819. 
Mr. Elias P>. .Stone came to tliis section 
when tlie county was a wilderness in 1S20 
and purchased land. The town was lo- 
cated about ]82fi, and the first store or 
trading jilace was established the follow- 
ing year, but the name of the person 
keeping it is in doubt. The first church 
built was the Christian in 18211. t^ome 
years later the M. E. Church was built. 
The present population of the place is 



about 250 inhabitants, and they have a. 
fine graded school. It is surrounded by a 
rich agricultural district and its business 
firms enjoy a liberal local patronage. Its 
business houses are noticed at length edi- 
torially, besides which we mention the 
wagon and carriage shops of Heeb & 
Shoenett and blacksmith shop of Jamea 
Striker. Fayctteville is located near the 
county line, about half way between Con- 
nersville and Rushville and three miles 
south of the C. II. it I. Railway. As in- 
dicative of the enterprise of the place, we 
notice that an excellent cornet band has 
recently been organized and handsomely 
equipped, reflecting credit to the place. 



L. S. HUNT. 

General Stork. 
In a comprehensive publication of this char- 
acter, the great object is the enumeration of the 
Tarious resources and industries, including 
departments particulurlv pertaining to the dit- 
ferent branches of commerce, wherein are 
embraced the historical, descriptive, biograph- 
ical and statistical, it would be an act oi great 
injustice were we to omit the mention of tliese 
enterprises which are the soul and the life of 
our smaller trade centers. Tlierelbre, in giving 
an historical sketch of the village ot Fayctte- 
ville, it is with pleasure that we are permitted 
to make mention of the general store con- 
ducted by Mr. L. S. Hunt, whose present enter- 
prise dated its inception as far back as it^67, 
when he began on an exceedingly small stock 
of goods. The salesroom is 33x18 teet in di- 
mensions, wherein is constantly kept in stock 
a fine and complete line of foreign and domes- 
tic dry goods, groceries, tobaccos and cigars, 
and all those commodities usually handled by 
an establishment of this character. In the 
rear o( the salesroom are two smaller rooms, 
which are used for storage purposes, the tu-st 
being iSxio and the latter iSxi2 feet in size. 
The average valuation of stock carried is not 
less than $4,000, and the annual transactions 
of this house will reach t'ully $10,000, the trade 
extending throughout this section. Mr. Hunt 
is ably assisted by his son Rilev, a j-oung man 
who is fully competent to perform the work in 



which he is now engaged. Mr. Hunt is a native 
of Rush County, having been born in 1S3S. 
Prior to the time of embarking in his present 
business, he was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits in Rush County, where his bovhood days 
were passed, as well as those of early man- 
hood. Starting in business life with almost 
nothing, procuring and disposing ofonlv the 
better grades and purer goods, and transacting' 
business on first principles, Mr. Hunt has suc- 
ceeded in building up a trade which is a credit 
to his town and an honor to himself. 

SAMUEL TUTTLE, 
Harness Maker. 
Samuel Tuttle was born in 1S40, in Penob- 
scot County, Maine, 'way up in old New 
England. His boyhood days were spent in 
the state of his nativity, where he lived until 
1S50, when he came to Fayetteville. In 1S5S 
he learned the trade of harness maker, which 
he worked at until 1S61, when, in August of 
the same year, he enlisted in Co. A, ist Battal- 
lion 19th U. S. Infantry. He served three 
years, during which time he participated in 
many of the most important engagements as 
well as skirmishes with the enemy. Some of 
the most notable battles through which he 
passed «ere Shiloh, Stone River and Chica- 
mauga, where he was taken prisoner in it>63. 
He was taken to the prison at Richmond, Va., 
from whence he was removed to Danville, 
and then back to Richmond, where he was 



42 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



paroled in September, 1S64, having been a 
prisoner of war for more than one year. Al- 
though hi* time was out in Auijsust, 1864, lie 
was not paroled until September of the same 
jear, after which, at Fort Wavne, Indiana, he 
was honorably discharged. After receiving 
his discharge as a veter.m of war, Mr. Tuttle 
traveled very considerably as a journeyman 
harness maker. In 1S76, centennial year, he 
came back to'Fayetteville and established liis 
present enterprise. He does all kind-> of work, 
making all kinds of harness, from common to 
the finest, as well as all kinds of repairing. 
The premises occupied are iSxJO feet in 
dimensions, in which may at all times be seen 
specimens of Mr. Tuttle's work. The trade 
extends to all parts of this section of country, 
and, although at first not extensive, lias gradu- 
ally increased until to day Mr. Tuttle has his 
share of the patronage of the (arming commu- 
nity. 



JOSEPH GEORGE .V SON, 
General Sioke. 
There is no branch of commercial pursuit 
requiring for its successful operation more 
sound jud'^ment, more experience and ability 
than are demanded in conducting large estab- 
lishments of miscellaneous merchandise, and 
there are no trade centres but which appreciate 
houses of this character. In this respect Fay- 
€tteville is exceedingly fortunate in the ])Osses- 
sion of a general store, which in magnitude of 
extent of trade and great success in amount of 
annual transactions, is equal to any contempo- 
raneous establishment in this section of 
Indiana. This firm was inaugurated three 
years ago and occupy a fine two-story struc- 
ture 71x25 feet in dimensions, which was 
erected especially for them. Two lloors are 
utilized in the prosecution of the business, the 
first or ground floor being used as a general 
salesroom. The stock carried is always full 
and complete, embracing dry goods, foreign 
and domestic ; groceries, staple and fancy ; 
canned and shelf goods, tobacco and cigars; 
hardware, heavv and papered, togetlier with 
those goods so essential and generally pertain- 
ing to this branch of commerce. The trade of 
this house is quite extensive, being derived 
from the surrounding country generally. The 
individual members, Joseph and W. A. 
George, are both natives and life- long resi- 
dents ot Fayetteville. Joseph was born in 1S36, 
and ever since quite young, has been identified 
with commercial pursuits in Fayetteville. In 
1S51 he entered the scenes of active business 
life by establishing himself in the same line of 



business in which he is now engaged, and 
w hich, although a small beginning, has steadily 
and gradually increased, until to-day, when its 
annual transactions will compare very favora- 
bly with any similar establishment in Eastern 
Indiana. In iSf>4, during Mr. Lincoln's 
administration, Mr. George was commissioned 
to act as post-master, which responsible posi- 
tion of trust he has since filled, and still holds 
to-dav. Mr. W. A. George was born in 1S62. 
When quite a young lad he was placed behind 
the counter of liis father's store, where he 
rendered valuable service as an assistant and 
salesman. In 1S71, three years ago, having 
long since recognized iiis business ability, and 
believing that he was destined to become a 
very successful business man, his father 
admitted him into the firm as a partner, the 
firm assuming the style and name of Joseph 
George iJ Son, which it still retains. 



C. E. MOOR, 

Dealer in Drugs, Groceries, Tobac- 
cos AND Cigars. 

Probably there is no department of trade so 
vastly important to the general welfare of the 
public as the one known as the drug trade; 
and certain it is that to the druggist located in 
the small trade centre is the farming commu- 
nity greatly indebted. Mr. C. E. Moor, the 
gentleman whose name lieads this sketch, is a 
native of Rush County, Ind., where he was 
born in 1S43. Prior to the time of the incep- 
tion of his present enterprise, he was eng.aged 
in agricultural pursuits in Fayette County, in 
which avocation his lite was occupied until 
1S77, when he came to Fayetteville and 
engaged in the drug business, which was in- 
augurated two years previous. The premises 
occupied comprise the salesroom 36x18 feet in 
dimensions, together with one room in the 
rear, whicli is utilized for storage purposes. 
The stock carried consists of such drugs, pro- 
prietary medicines, paints, oils, and articles 
generally needed to supply the demands of the 
I'arming community ; also groceries, tobaccos 
and cigars, and goods generally kept in stock 
by houses of this character. The business an- 
nually transacted is moderately lucrative, and 
the trade which has considerably increased 
under the management of Mr. Moor, extends 
throughout this section, being derived very 
largely from the farming community. Mr. 
Moor is a comparatively young man, pos- 
sesses good business ability, and is well and 
favor.ibly known in both Rush and Fayette 
counties. 



FAIRVIEW. 



The village of Fairview, chiefly situa- 
ted on the Fayette County side of the 
pike dividing Kuah and Fayette counties, 
was laid out in 1824. It is located near 
the north-west part of the county and is 
•one mile from Falmouth the nearest rail- 
road point. The post office is called 



Groves. ]Mrs. Caldwell is the post mis 
tress. The town contains an M. E. and a 
Christian Church, a fine seminary or gra- 
ded school, a grocery and provision store 
a blacksmith shop and a boot and shoe 
maker. 



\V. W. GIBBS, 

Grockriks, Pkovision-s, Etc. 
Originally established bv Mr. Geo. C. Mc- 
■Cliiie, this popular house came into the pos- 
session of the present proprietor. M.irch ist, 
18S3, since which time a prosperous anil lucra- 
tive trade has been secured. Mr. Gibbs 
carries a complete and compiehensive assort- 
ment of the choicest varieties of staple and 
•fancy groceries, teas, coffees, spices, sugars, 
syrups, soaps, canned goods, provisions, tine 
cigars and tob.iccos, glassware, queensw.are, 
hardware and miscellaneous merchandise, 
such as are usually found in a first-class estab- 
lishment of this class. His lacilities for pro- 
curing supplies are such as to enable hiin to 
compete with more pretentious houses. Mr. 
Gibbs is a native of Rush County, but was 
•educated in this place and at Kokomo, Indi- 
ana, where he was for some time engaged in 
■mercantile pursuits. He located in Fairview 
in iSSi, and embarking in his present success- 
ful enterprise in the spring of 1SS3. 

WM. HIGLEY, 
Blacksmith. 
With a thorough knowledge of all depart- 
tnents of the business, acquired during many 
jyears_practical experience as a journeyman in 



the principal blacksmith and wagon making 
shops of Cincinnati and Indianapolis, Mr. 
Win. Higley embarked in his present enter- 
prise in Fairview in 1S72, and during the past 
twelve years has gained an enviable reputa- 
tion throughout this section as a carelul, 
skilled and conscientious workman in his 
special branches of business; which comprise 
l-.orse-shoeing upon scientific principles, iron- 
ing wagons, carriages, carts, buggies, etc., and 
general iobbing and repairing of the same in 
both the iron and the wood-working depart- 
ments. He also makes a specialty of repairing 
agricultural tools, implements and machinery 
in the most thorough and workmanlike man- 
ner, and at reasonable rates. Mr. Higley is a 
native ofGermanv, and was born at Baden in 
1334. He came to tlie United States with his 
parents when but four years of age, landing at 
New York, and from thence proceeding to 
Chillicothe, Ohio, where he remained until he 
was twenty-three years of age, and where he 
learned the trade of blacksmith and carriage 
ironer, with all departments of which he is 
practically conversant. He has been a resident 
of this stale during the greater portion of the 
past twenty vears, and since embarking in 
business oti his own account, has secured a 
lucrative trade, extending to different sections 
of this and adjoining counties. 



^^■-*- 



RUSH COUNTY, 



The incidents of jiioneer life in track- 
less forests such as once abounrled here, 
cannot he given in detail in the limits 
prescribed to the present work and we can 
only open the history of Rush County by 
introducing the reader to a number of the 
early settlers. Among these were Steph- 
en Lewis, Aaron Lewis, Hon. Stanley 
Cooper, A. Hackleman, Bcnj. F. Reeve, 
Jacob Goblc, John Hawkins, John Tal- 
bert, John H. Lines, John Perkins, Jno. 
Julian, Dr. W. B. Laughlin, Conrad Sail- 
ors and John Smith. 

Among the early preachers was Rev. 
Wm. ]\[;uizy, baptist, who luid been a sol- 
dier in the Revolution. Li 1830 he re- 
moved to New Salem, where he died 
April 6th, 1837. Among the pioneer 
Methodist ministers was Rev. J. B. Hav- 
ens. Among early Presbyterian mini.s- 
ters may be mentioned Dr. J. F. Crowe 
and Rev. Wm. Seckles. 

No school houses were erected for sev- 
eral years after early settlement although 
schools were taught for a few weeks each 
winter, usually in some abandoned cabin. 
Early teachers were Esquire Phipps 1820, 
Francis Clark, John Talbert, Isaac Fow- 
ler, 1831; James Ross, 18.'53; Benj. F. 
Reeve, 18.34; James Matliews also being 
among the first teachers. The first school 
house was built on the farm of Judge 
Gregg, a few miles west of the town of 
Fayetteville ; another was built on the 
farm of John Hawkins. They were con- 
structed of logs, the windows being made 
of paper saturated with grease; afterward 
sash and glass were added. 



The county of Rush was organized irr 
1822 and was named after Dr. BenjamiQ 
Rush. The first Board of Commissioners' 
met at the house of John Perkins, five 
miles south-cost of the present county 
scat, April 1st, 1822 ; and consisted of 
Anuiziah Morgan, Jno. Perkins and Jno. 
Julian. Tlie first olKcers by aj)pointmcnt 
were John Hays, shcriil ; Robt. Thomp- 
son, clerk. Tiie commissioners here di- 
vided the county into si.\ townships, viz : 
Union, Ripley, V/asbington, >i'oi)le, Rich- 
land and Orange. The first regular elec- 
tion was hehl April 27th, 1822. At a 
called meeting held June 17tli, 1822, to 
locate a county seat, the present site was 
selected, then in the township of Greea 
which had been formed chiefly from 
Washington but was now changed to 
Rushville. The first prison was built of 
hewn oak logs and was erected on the 
south-east corner of the Public Square. 
The first court house was a square two 
story brick so peculiar to those days. For 
the purposes of a county seat Dr. AV. B. 
Laughlin donated to the county 25 acres 
and Z. Hodges 45 acres, to secure the lo- 
cation. The first court held in the county 
was at the house of Stephen Sims, April 
24, 1822, but was adjourned to the house 
of John Perkins: Pcrkin's Corners was a 
trading point in those days and was a 
widely known and popular resort. 

The ''Doij Fennel" Gazette was the first 
paper published in the county, liy Wm. D.. 
Wickham in September, 1822, size 10x12. 
The bed of the press was on the top of a 
sycamore stuuip, and the power applied 



RUSH COUNTY. 



45 



ty a long pole inserted in a mortice of an 
adjoining tree. He afterward made a 
press after tlie style of a cider press when 
he called his pajjer "Wickhani's Velocity 
Press." Thus we have a glimpse of the 
earlier days which were promotive of the 
present jtopuloiis and prosi)erous county. 
Rush County is bounded on the east 
l)y Fayette and Franklin, on the soutii 
by Decatur, on the west by Shelby and 
Hancock, and on the north by Henry 
■County. The county is 23 miles long by 
18 miles broad and embraces about 264,- 
■060 acres. The county as at present di- 
vided embraces the following townships : 
Anderson, Center, Jackson, Noble, Posey, 
Orange, Richland, Ripley and Rushville. 
"The principal towns outside the county 



seat are Carthage, Milroy, Arlington, Ho- 
mer, Glenwood, Manilla and Falmouth. 
This is one of the best grain pruducing 
counties in the state, with undulating sur- 
face and finely watered by rivers and 
streams in all sections. The soil is rich 
alluvium possessing superior fertility. In 
some parts of the county lime stone, sand 
stone and crystal rock abound. The tim- 
ber which is yet in comparative abund- 
ance is beach, black and white walnut, 
poplar, ash, hickory, sugar and maple, 
red and white oak, elm, buckeye, syca- 
more, etc. The various railroads which 
traverse the county are noticed elsewhere 
giving as they do excellent shipping ad- 
vautijges east, west, north and south. 




City of ^usiLVille. 



As noticed in the history of the county 
this now flourishing aud btautifiil city 
was laid out in 1822 l)y Conrad Sailors 
as agent for the county, the sale of lots 
ordered for July 29th, 1S22, and the first 
lot purchased by tiie celebrated Jolin 
Smith. It is supposed that the first house 
was built by Samuel Alley or Z. Hodges. 
The first store was kept by Keuben I'ugh 
(east side) in 1823. It slioidd be men- 
tioned among the early incidents of this 
place that at the fir.st regular term of 
court there were admitted to the bar per- 
sons who have since attained both a state 
and national celebrity, among whom we 
may mention Hon. C. H. List, JIartin M. 
Ray and Joseph Hopkins. The first 
prosecuting attorney was Hiram M. Cur- 
ry. While it is claimed by some that 
John Arnold had the first store, yet it 
appears evident that Conrad Sailors had 
the first. Dr. Jefferson Helm was among 
the first physicians. Perhaps to no one 
person is due a greater degree of credit 
for his arduous and succcs.-iful efforts to- 
ward the promotion of taste, culture [aid 
refinement, than to Dr. W. B. Laugldin 
who erected at his own expense a two 
story building for the purpose of teaching 
the higher branches. He came here in 
1820, and it was the first classical school 
in the county. The first blacksmith shop 
in the town was conducted by Harvey 
Laughlin. The first postmaster was Chas. 
H. Vurder. The first church was held 
in a. school building erected in 182.3. 
The first Justice of the Peace was Steph- 
en Sims. The first grist mill near here 



was by Jolin H. Lines, while the first 
.steam mill was by Gen. Robinson. 

Thus came into activity one of the 
most prosperous trade centers as well as 
one of the most beautiful towns in the 
state of Indiana. 

Iir.SIIVILLE TO-DAY 

possesses a population of about 4,000 in- 
habitants. Its manufacturing and busi- 
ness facilities are indicated in the iU)un- 
dant shipping facilities it enjoys in its 
railroads extending in every direction; 
the C. II. & I. running cast and west, the 
J. M. & I. from north-east to south-west, 
and the Greensburg, Rushville and New 
Castle railway north and south. Its busi- 
ness houses are unsurpassed in extent 
and enterprise, while its local trade, sup- 
ported by a flourishing and wealthy class 
of agriculturists, will bear favorable com- 
parison with any city of its size in the 
state. From the first "velocity press" it 
now has three ably conducted and well 
supported weekly papers; the Ripubllcan, 
the Graphic, and the Jacksonian. It 
enjoys the very best common and high 
school advantages, while all the promi- 
nent denominations are well represented 
among its various church congregations. 
The city is handsomely laid out and its 
streets beautifully shaded, while it pos- 
sesses mosi of tliose modern improve- 
ments which at the present day go so far 
toward marlcing a community as progi'es- 
sive and enterprising. 

Its leading business concerns to which 
is largely due its present thrift and pros- 
perity, are noticed specially in the pages 
which follow, and worthy careful perusal. 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



47 



RUSH COUNTY NATIONAL BANK, 
Corner of Main and Ruth Sts. 
The Rush County National Eank, which 
was organiied and incorporated under the 
national banking laws in 1S71, with a capital 
stock of $100,000 paid up, and a charter for 
twenty years was practically a re-organization 
of theRush County Banking Company, which 
had been in existence for many years. The 
original stock-holdtrs and incorporators were 
Lewis ^L^ddux of New York city, Thomas 
Maddux of Cincinnati, Ohio, \Vm. B. Maddux 
of Cincinnati, Ohio, and Oliver Posey, E. H. 
M. Berry, Leonidas Sexton, Jacob tL Oglesby, 
John Carr, and John Carmichael of this city. 
The first officers of the bank under its present 
charter were, Oliver Posey, president, and 
James La kin, cashier; and the present otTicers 
are, L. Link, president, elected January ist, 
lSS4;and E. D. Pugh, cashier, elected January 
28th, 18S4. The bank transacts a general b mk- 
ing business in loans, deposits, discounts, col- 
lection and exchange with correspondents in 
all the principal cities east and west, and will 
be found a most desirable institution with 
which to open an account or transact any 
legitimate financial business matters. Mr. 
Link, the president, is a native and life-long 
resident of this county and state, and is favora- 
bly known tlirougtiout this section in business 
and financial circles. He has been identified 
with the interests of the bank in the capacity 
of director tor the past two years. \Vm. Pugh, 
the cashier, was born in this city, and was 
formerly employed as an assistant cashier in 
the Rushville National Bank. The board of 
directors is composed of the following well 
known and prominent citizens, whose connec- 
tion with the management of its finances is a 
sufficient guarantee of its solvency, reliability, 
and safe conservative administration ofafl'airs: 
Oliver Posey, T. N. Link, W. T. Branii, B. L. 
Smith, Lewis Maddux, J. H. Oglesby and L. 
Link. 

THE MAUZY COMPANY, 
Double Store, Ruth St. 
"The Mauzv Company," one of the most 
important of Rusliviile's commercial houses, 
which is prepared to substantiate its claims as 
"the cheapest place in Rush County to buy 
goods tor cash," is the outgrowth of a consoli- 
dation of two large dry goods establishments, 
formerly conducted in this city by the indi- 
vidual members of the present combination — 
Messrs. G. G., W. J., C. A. and E. H. Mauzy. 
The magnificent storerooms occupied by this 
representative company are among the finest 
and largest in the state devoted to trade pur- 
poses, having a fioor space of 42x165 feet, 
which are fitted up in elegant metropolitan 
style for the advantageous display of their 
immense stock of merchandise, embracing the 
finest and most fashionable fabrics in foreign 
and American dry gooes, woolens, domestics, 
white gootis, dress goods, house turnishing 
supplies, ladies', gentlemen's and cliildren's 
furnishing goods and underwear, laces, em- 



broideries, trimmings, notions, small wares, 
haberdashery, carpets, boots, shoes, rubbers 
and miscellaneous mercliandise in great varie- 
ty pertaining to these special departments of 
trade. In comparison with other mercantile 
establishments in this section, the double 
stores occupy the same relative position that 
Macv's in New York, and Wanamaker's in 
Philadelphia do to the smaller houses in these 
great cities, carrying immense lines of mer- 
chandise of a diversified character, and leading 
rather than competing in the matter of variety 
and magnitude of stock, and in low prices as 
well. The individual members of this com- 
pany, whose names are given above are all 
natives of this state, and have been for many 
years prominently identified ,vith the com- 
mercial interests of Rushville. Their charac- 
ters and reputations for integrity and cnterpri.^e 
are too widely known to require comment at 
our hands. 



WINDSOR HOTEL. 

The general reputation of a town or cit3' de- 
pends largely upon its hotel accommodations. 
Many of our smallest towns are noted to the 
general traveling public, not on account of their 
manufacturing or mercantile interests, but 
because ot their widespread reputation as a 
model hotel town, where the traveling man's 
comfort is amply provided for. Rushville is 
not behind her .sister cities m her hotel accom- 
modations, possessing two hotels of ample 
capacity for the general pi:blic — the leading 
one is known as the "Windsor;'" it was built 
in 1S54 by Harvey Carr, v% hose name it bore 
for some years. Since Mr. Carr's manage- 
ment, this well known house has passed 
through many changes of ownership. .Specially 
among its list of landlords were Squire Poe, 
Ricketts and Payne, W. C.Jones, F. A. Capp, 
whose name it also bore tor a few years. He 
was succeeded by Johnson Bros , followed by 
F. A. Jones, who was succeeded by the present 
proprietor, Geo. P. Davis, October 2d, 1SS3. 
The building is 70x70 feet in dimensions, three 
stories in hight; it contains about forty rooms. 
On the first floor is the large and commodious 
office, fronting on two streets. On tliis floor 
is also the reading room, «riting room, wash 
room reception room and parlor; on this floor 
is also the large and well furnished dining 
hall and kitchen; this floor also contains two 
sample rooms for coinmercial men. The sec- 
ond and third floors are all devoted to sleeping 
apartments, well furnished and ventilated. 
'1 his hotel, under its present management, is 
not surpassed bv any hotel in Eastern Indiana. 
The ctiisitic department is worthy of special 
mention. The tables are siip]ilied at all times 
with the best the market aflords, served up in 
the highest style of the culinary art. 'I'he 
transient rates are put down to the popular 
prices of $2.00 per day. As may be interred, 
the Windsor is tlie favorite stopping place for 
the general traveling public, especially popular 
with the merchant traveler. Mr. Geo. P. Da- 
vis, than whom few hotel men in this section 



4S 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



of the State are better known, is a son of Col. 
Davis, one of the best known hotel men in the 
State of Ohio. Under ils present popular and 
judicious management, the Winlsor has 
secured a leading position among the hotels of 
this section of Indiana. 

RUSHVILLE MACHINE WORKS, 
Nolan, Madden & Co. 
Prominent among the industrial enterprises 
which have aided in giving to our progressive 
inland city a national reputation as a manufac- 
turing centre is the Rushville Machine Works 
of Messrs. Nolan, Madden &. Co., manufactur- 
ers of tile machinery, etc , and general found- 
ers and machinists." This representative firm 
was established in 1876, at whicli time they 
commenced the manufacture of tile machinery 
as a special feature of their business, and dur- 
ing the intervening period they have made a 
prominent feature and constant study of this 
now important industry. At the very incep- 
tion of their enterprise, they recognized the 
importance of using only the best material in 
all parts of the "mach'mes, and employing 
skilled labor and the most approved machinery 
for their construction. They have from time 
to time, as the result of careful observation, 
practical tests and experiments involving 
great expense, introduced valuable and im 
portant improvements, many of which are used 
by no other manufacturers, retaining the best 
features and rejecting entirely, or obviating by 
new methods all the objectionable points 
hitherto connected with tile machinery, until, 
as the result of their efforts, tlicy contidently 
present to the notice of tile manufacturers 
everywhere their perfected Hoosier Tile and 
Brick Machines, made in a variety of styles for 
special purposes, as the absolute acmr and tie 
J>lus ultra ol tile machinery. As an evidence 
of the high appreciation with which these ma- 
chines are regarded, it may be stated that, 
without special elTorl on the part of the firm to 
extend their sales, the machines manufactured 
by them are now in successful operation in 
thirteen states and territories of the Union and 
in British America, and orders continue to 
come in m such rapid succession as to tax the 
*itmost productive capacity of their extensive 
works. Their spacious buildings, two stories 
in hight, covering an aggregate ground space 
ofSi/z'^iOj feet, are equipped throughout with 
the most approved designs of special machin- 
erv, propelled by one steam engine and boiler, 
and an average force of thirty-tive skilled 
laborers is constantly employed in the various 
departments of their business, at a weekly ex- 
pense for the item of labor alone of nearly 
$400. This is the only establishment of its 
kind in the city. The special products are 
improved styles of mill machinery, the 
Hoosier Clay Crushers, auger and plunger tile 
machines, revolving cut olf table, kiln doors, 
' trucks, axles, spring barrows, cut-olf wire, etc., 
and possesses the amplest facilities for turning 
out light or heavy castmgs of every descrip- 
tion. The firm has issued for the convenience 



of their patrons a finely illustrated descriptive 
catalogue containing views and detailed infor- 
mation as to the various styles of machinery 
manufactured, and directions for ordering the 



AUGER TILE MILL NO. 5. 




interchangeable parts thereof, which are 
always carried in stock, and can be shipped 
without delay. They have also published in 
pamphlet form an exhaustive and able treatise 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



49 



on the subject of tile manufacturing, entitled 
"The Handbook of Tile Manufacturers," giv- 
ing full and coTnplete instructions for the 
selection of material and clay, the construction 
of tile works, the purchase of machinery, the 
various processes of pressing, drying, burnin^^, 
yarding and selling drain tile. This little book 
gives in plain and concise terms valuable infor- 
mation that should be in the possession of 
every manufacturer vfho would make his busi- 
ness a success, and it will be cheerfully for- 
warded to manufacturers or interested parties 
upon application in person or by mail to 
^lessrs. Nolan, Madden i: Co., Rushville, Ind. 
The individual members of this representative 
and enterprising firm are Michael Nolan, 
Bernard Madden and Thomas Madden, all of 
whom are natives and life-long residents of 
Indians, and practical and experienced mech- 
anicians, who have inade a special study of the 
branch of indu.stry in which they liave 
achieved such a gratifying degree of success, 
and placed their tirm at the head of the tile 
making machinery establishments of the 
United States. 

RUSHVILL?: NATIONAL BANK. 

The marked success attendant upon the 
career andoperations of the Rushville National 
Bank is of such a pronounced and obvious 
character as to demand more than ordinary 
attention in making a carelvil review of the 
fiduciary and financial institutions of tlie State 
of Indiana. This bank, which was organized 
under the national banking system, February 
22d, 1S65, commenced operations in the t'oHow- 
ing September as successors to the old Rush- 
ville branch of the Bank of the State of Indi- 
ana, which had been in existence tor many 
years previously in this city. The first presi- 
dent of the bank under its new charter was 
Geo. C. Clark, Esq., who has acceptibly filled 
that responsible position till the present time. 
Mr. Joseph Oglesby was the fir>t cashier, but 
in January, 1S70, he tendered his resignation 
and was succeeded by the present incumbent, 
Mr. Edwin Payne. The original capital stock 
was fixed at $100,000, and the latest reports 
show in addition to this, an accumulated sur- 
plus fund of more than $20,000, with a list of 
depositors numbering more than i,(joo. The 
Rushville National conducts a general legiti- 
mate banking business in loans, discounts, 
deposits, collections and exchange, with cor- 
respondents in all the principal cities; and its 
management has been sate and conservative, 
and at the same time enterprising and liberal 
to its patrons. Mr. Geo. C. Clark is a native 
of North Carolina, and came to this state with 
his father in 1S35. He soon after returned to 
his native state and fitted himself for the bar. 
In 1S44 he returned to Indiana and com- 
menced the practice of law in this city. He 
was for many years the attorney tor the old 
Branch Bank, and in 1S64 became its president, 
and when that institution was merged into the 
present national bank, he was persuaded to 
accept the presidency, which position he has 



since held in connection with an extensive 
law practice, which he is now closing up as 
rapidly as possible, with a view to retiring 
permanently from the profession which he has 
so long adorned. Mr. Edwin Payne is one of 
our best known and public spirited citizens 
and in addition to fulfilling the responsible 
duties of cashier, is also prominently identified 
with the milling and manufacturing interests 
of this section. 

J. B. SCHRICHTE, 

Rushville Marble Works. 
Of the many industrial occupations requir- 
ing a high grade of skilled labor, and one 
which, rising above the mere power of me- 
chanical skill verges into the artistic, none are 
more worthy of our highest praise and consid- 
eration than that of monumental sculpture as 
conducted at the present day in our princliial 
cities. Within the past few years greater 
attention than ever before has been devoted to 
making attractive by natural end artificial 
methods our "cities of the dead," and the 
beautitul monuments which mark the last 
resting places ol the departed, testify alike to 
the appreciation of the living and to the artis- 
tic skill and abilities of those whose cunning 
art has designed and evoked from imperisha- 
ble marble and granite these tastelul tributes 
of regard and affection. The only establish- 
ment in the c'ty of Rushville engaged in this 
special department of the mechanical arts is 
that now located in the commodious new 
brick building on Main St., opposite the Grand 
Hotel, conducted by Mr. J. B. Schrichte, who 
commenced business in this city in iSs9, a"d 
removed to his present quarters in 1884, where 
he occupies a fine building it)x6o leet in size 
erected by himself expressly for the accommo- 
dation of his steadily increasing trade. Mr. 
Schrichte, who is an artistic designer and 
practical marble worker, has turned out some 
elegant specimens of monumental work dur- 
ing his successful career in this city, noticea- 
ble among which we may especially mention 
in this connection, a fine monument in the 
East Hill Cemetery, erected to the memory of 
James Wilson, at a cost of $2,i;oo. He carries 
in stock a fine line of Scotch and American 
granites and Italian, Tennessee and Vermont 
marble in blocks and slabs, as well as an ele- 
gant assortment of finished monuments, head- 
stones and cemetery devices, ready lor the 
inscriptions, and enjoys the most excellent and 
complete facilities tor the prompt execution of 
all work pertaining to this line. He employs 
five experienced assistants, and transacts an 
annual business of about $10,000, with a trade 
extending to all parts of this and adjoining 
counties. Mr. Schrichte is a native oi'Hano- 
ver, Germany, where he was born in lS3v 
He came to America in 1S53, and to Indiana 
in 1S57, establishing his present business two 
years later, in which, by industry, tVugality 
and energy, he has amassed a handsome prop- 
erty. His business block, now in course ot 
erection, is one of the best in the city. He has 



50 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



attained an enviable position among the solid 
and successful business men of our inland city. 

PAVEV \- BROWN, 

Hardware, Stoves and Tinware. 

In a descriptive revision of the industries 
and commerce ot Kushville, it is highly per- 
tinent and important that all the vocations 
contingent upon any staple line of business 
enterprise should be recognized as havins; no 
little to do with the general facilities and ad- 
vantages of the city as a trade centre. In 
examining, therelore, the claims of those firms 
which are most prominently identified with 
the progress and welfare of thie city, it would 
be impossible to overlook the representative 
house of Messrs. Pavey A: Brown, dealers In 
hardware, stoves, tinware and house-lurnish- 
ing goods, whose salesrooms are located on 
Ruth St. near Main, covering a ground space 
of 20x160 feet, where is constantly carried a 
complete and comprehensive assortment of 
merchandise in each of the departments above 
enumerated. Thi^ firm commenced business 
in this city in September iSSi, with a capital 
of $15,000, and their fir^t year's transactions 
did not exceed $y,ooo. The valuation of their 
present stock is not Ici-s than $7,000, and their 
sales for the present v ear will closely appro.xi- 
mate $iS,ooo, an increase in three _\ears ot" 
fully 100 per cent. The individual members 
of this enterprising firm are, Absalom Pavey 
and Andrew C. Brown, both of whom are 
natives of Indiana. The former was born in 
1S4S, and the latter in 1S54. Mr. Pavey is at 
the present time a member of the city council, 
representing the first ward in that body. It is 
not too much to assert that, as a firm, Messrs. 
Pavey & Brown are lullv entitled to the pros- 
perity which has attended their successful 
businest career, and in achieving for them- 
selves their present prominent position in 
commercial circles, the legitimate Iruits of their 
enterprise, integrity and honorable dealings. 

CHURCHILL & BUSH, 

Groceries and Pkovisions, Main St. 
Conducted strictly upon a cash basis, pur- 
chasing directly from importers, jobbers, 
manufacturers and producers for cash, and 
opening no time accounts, compelling ca^h 
customers to pav indirectly the bad debts and 
losses incurred in "trusting out" merchandise 
to irresponsible parties, Messrs. Churcliill & 
Bush are enabled to ofl'er to their patrons 
extraordinary inducements not readily dupli- 
cated by anv contemporaneous establishment 
in Eastern Indiana in this special line. This 
model "cash grocery," centrally and eligibly 
located upon the principal business thorough- 
fare of the city, was ctablished by its present 
proprietors in May, iSS;, and has steadily won 
its way to public tavor by a strict adherence 
to the cash system, and to the correct princi- 
ples of mercantile honor and business integri- 
ty. The premises occupied lor the sales 
uepartment are 32x46 feet in dimensions and 
the stock carried embraces a general line of 



staple and fancy groceries and provisions, 
farm and dairy produce, fruit and vegetables 
in season, family tiour, choice teas and colTees, 
pure spices, canned goods and (grocers' sundries 
generally, selected with a special view to the 
requirements of the better class of city and 
country trade. The average valuation of stock 
carried ranges from $2,500 to $3,000 and the 
annual transactions at the present time will 
exceed $12,000. Mr. Wm. Churchill is a native 
and lite-long resident of this state, and Mr. C. 
C. Bush, also a native of Indiana, was born in 
1S54. ^^'^- Bush has exclusive charge of the 
business, Mr. Churchill being engaged in the 
lumber trade here, requiring his whole atten- 
tion. Residents ofRushville and adjoining 
towns will find this a most desirable house 
vsith which to establish pleasant and profitable 
business relations. 



RUSHVILLE ELEVATOR, 

W. C. Mauzy & Co., Grain Dealers. 
The city ofRushville, by reason of its natu- 
ral and acquired advantages, its geographical 
situation in the heart of the grain producing 
disiricts of this fertile section of the states, its 
admirable systems of inter-communication and 
transportation with all parts of the Union, its 
mammoth elevators, and especially the enter- 
prise displayed by such representative mer- 
chants as those which forin the subject of the 
present sketch, Messrs. W. C. Mauzy & Co., 
has become an important trade centre and 
distributing point for the cereal products of 
Rush and adjoining counties. This well-known 
house was ibunded more than twenty years 
ago by Mr. Wm. Churchill, who was succeeded 
by the firm of Mauzy \' Churchill, and that 
in turn by the present firm in 18S0. The main 
elevator building is 36x80 feet in dimensions, 
with an L 25x50 feet, and has a storage 
capacity for 60,000 bushels of grain at one 
lime. Steam power is utilized for loading and 
unloading cars and hoisting grain, and the 
facilitied enjoyed by this firm for the shipment 
of grain are not surpassed by thoseofany con- 
temporaneous establishment in the state. 
Since the inauguration of this important enter- 
prise, the average amount of grain handled 
annually by this house will considerably 
exceed 200,000 bushels, with a trade extending 
to all sections of the Union, Messrs. Mauzv 
Sc Co. arc at all times prepared to pav cash and 
the highest ruling rates for wheat and grain, 
and their annual transactions exert an import- 
ant influence upon the commercial thrift of 
this community, and the agricultural develop- 
ment of this .section. The individual members 
of the firm as at present, organized, are W. C., 
G. G. and E. H. Mauzy, and .Seth .Monroe. 
Mr. W. G. Mauzy is a native of Kentucky, 
but has been a resident ot and permanently 
identified with the commercial interests of this 
state for more than half a century. The other 
members of the firm are "natives here to the 
manner born," and in addition to their exten- 
sive interests in the grain trade, have been for 
many years actively engaged in mercantile 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



51 



pursuits, and are still prominent in other fields 
of commercial enttrpri?e, referred to at greater 
length under their appropriate heails in other 
portions of this historical review of Rusliville's 
representative merchants and business houses. 



CITY MILLS, 

Thos. W. Hii.ligos.s, Prop'r. 
The well known and popular "City Mills" 
of Rushville, located on South Main St., were 
originally established in 1S75, and transacted a 
prosperous custom business until iSSo, when 
the buildings were destroyed by fire. They 
were almost immediately rebuilt upon a more 
extensive scale by Mr. J. B. Fouch, who at the 
same time introduced numerous important 
improvements upon the original plan, and 
conducted the business successfully until the 
time of his death in 1SS3. In October of that 
year Mr. Thomas W. Hilligoss, the present 
enterprising proprietor, purchased a half inter- 
est in the business, and on the following 
Christmas the entire management and control 
of the mills passed into his possession. The 
main building, which is 48x50 t'eet in dimen- 
sions and two stories in bight, is constructed 
with an especial view to aflbrding fine bolting 
facilities and capacity, and is provided through- 
out with the latest improved devices of ma- 
chinery, including one run of stone on mid- 
dlings, one on corn, and three sets of double 
rollers of improved construction for the pro- 
duction of the finest grades of family flour, 
which meet with a ready sale in the home 
markets to the local trade. The machinery 
employed is propelled by one thirty-five horse 
power engine and boiler, and the mills have a 
capacity for turning out sixty barrels of choice 
flour every twenty-four hours. Mr. Hilligoss 
is a native of this countv, and was born in 1S39. 
He was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
attaining his majoritv, when he embarked in 
general merchandizing at Manilla, where he 
remained until 1S6S, when he removed to 
Greensburg, and was actively engaged in com- 
mercial life until 1S7S. when he retired to a 
farm, and remained until embarking in his 
present business. 

HART & PRENDERGAST, 

Grocers, Cor. M.mn' and Xoble Sts. 
Among the grocery establishments of Rush- 
ville, we notice the popular house now con- 
ducted by the enterprising firm of Hart tS: 
Prendergast, located on the corner of Main 
and Noble Sts., where, in a tastefully arranged 
salesroom 20xSo feet in dimensions, may be 
con~tanlly found a choice and careiullv 
selected stock of the best grades of staple and 
fancy groceries and provisions, table and cul- 
inary supplies, fruits and vegetables, choice 
imported wines and liquors, old rye, bourbon 
and sour mash whiskies, ales, beers, tobacco, 
cigars and miscellaneous merchandise, such as 
is usually found in first-class metropolitan 
establishments of this description. This house 
was established by Mr. Patrick Hart in 1S79, 
and he conducted the business successfully 



until March 1SS3, when Mr. P. J. Prendergast 
was admitted to an interest, and the present 
firm name and style was adopted. Mr. Hart is 
a native of the Emerald Isle, and was born in 
the County Leitrim in 1S25. He came to the 
United States in 1S47, landing at Nc\\ Orleans, 
and first secured employment at railroad build- 
ing. He was variously einployed at whatever 
pursuit he found opportunities, until becoming 
a resident of this township in .March, 1S53. 
Mr. P. J. Prendergast, also a native of Ireland, 
was born in County Mayo in 1S46. and landed 
at New York in 1S67. He came to this section 
of the state in 1870. and was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits until the formation of the 
present partnership. 

H. G. HILLIGOSS, 

Books .\nd St.\tionfry. 
No better evidence of the civilization and 
culture of the people of any community need 
be adduced than the patronage bestowed upon 
establishments devoted to the dissemination of 
standard and miscellaneous literature, and 
associated articles, such as ordinarily consti- 
tute the stock in trade of the modern book- 
seller and stationer. Judged from this stand- 
point, and from the character of it;, rejiresenta- 
tive establi.-hment iu this line, (that conducted 
by Mr. H. G. Hilligoss) the city of Rushville 
IS not behind her sister cities ol the west in 
these distinctive characteristics, which indicate 
education, culture and -.esthetic taste. This 
popular house wliich was established in 1S79, 
by its present enterprising proprietor, is cen- 
trally and eligibly located on .N'ain St. in a 
two-story brick structure 23x60 feet in dimen- 
sions, and the stock carried embraces a general 
line of standard publications, including works 
on history, biography, science, art, poetry, the- 
ology, and fiction, school and misceiianeous 
books, the standard libraries of the day, period- 
ical literature, blank books, legal, commercial 
and faiTiily stationery, school supplies, fancy 
articles, stationers' sundries in great variety, 
new and desirable styles of wall papers of the 
common and finer varieties, Windsor shades, 
curtains and articles of this description for 
decorative purposes and home adornment. 
The stock is at all times complete and compre- 
hensive, and all new publications are received 
direct I'rom the leading publishers east and 
west, simultaneously with their issues from 
the press; while books in any department of 
literature, not found in stock, will be procured 
at short notice by Mr. Hilligoss, who is in 
constant communication witli metropolitan 
publishing house-> and dealers; and turnished 
to patrons at publisher's prices. This is one of 
the largest if not the most extensive houses of 
its class in Eastern Indiana, and the annual 
transactions will compare tavorably with any 
similar establishment in this part of the stiite. 
Mr. Hilligoss is a native of this state, and was 
born in ib^S. He possesses a comprehensive 
acquaintance with ancient and modern stand- 
ard literature, and his facilities for procuring 
supplies in books, stationery and wall papers, 



52 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



are not surpassed by those of any similar 
establishment in the interior. 

JOHN A. READLE, 

Paints, Glass, Wall Paper, Etc. 
Thccl.Tssof merchandise handled by Mr.Jno. 
A. Readle, its compreh',n.=^ive variety and 
extent, the matjnitude of his trans.ictions, and 
his honorable and conscientious methods of 
dealing, render his establishment worthy of 
more than ordinary consideration in a histor- 
ical review of the representative business 
houses of Rushville. This house which was 
founded by its present enterprising proprietor 
in 1874, has during the past decade established 
a trade extending throughout Rush and 
adjoining counties, and its career has been 
onward and upward in public favor, the annual 
transactions at the present time aggregating 
more than $15,000. The premises occupied 
comprise a two story brick building 19x7:! J^ 
feet in dimensions, where two assistants are 
regularly employed in the sales department. 
The stock carried embraces a general line of 
paints, oils, varnishes, brushes and painters' 
supplies, picture frames and mouldings, wall- 
papers of the latest styles and designs, curtains 
and shades, window glass of all sizes, puttv 
and glaziers* supplies in great variety, and 
miscellaneous merchandise pertaining tothese 
special branches of trade. Mr. Readle is a 
native of the State of Kentucky, where he was 
born in 1S4S. He has been a resident of this 
state since 1S69, and of Rushville for the past 
fifteen years. D\iring the war of the rebellion 
Mr. Readle entered the service of the United 
States as a member of the Fourth Ohio Caval- 
ry, Col. Kennet, and with that organiiation 
went to the front and was engaged in numer- 
ous battles and skirmishes with the enemv at 
various points, receiving an honorable dis- 
charge after eighteen months active service in 
the field. He is an ex-member of the Rush- 
ville City Council. 



CLINE & PLOUGH, 

LivHRY, Feed and Sale Stables, Mor- 
gan St. 
As one of the best equipped, conveniently 
arranged and well managed establishments of 
this class in Eastern Indiana, we notice that 
now conducted by the enterprising firm of 
Cline & Plough, whose spacious and commo- 
dious stables 40x1:10 feet in dimensions, with a 
stabling capacity for 175 head of horses, are 
eligiblv and conveniently located on Morgan 
St. These stables were originally established 
by Mr. Joseph Johnson in iS77;hewas suc- 
ceeded by Mr. A. S. Cline, who conducted the 
business alone until February, 1SS4, when 
Mr. John Plough became as'-ociated with him 
in the management of the business which has 
since grown to be one of considerable magni- 
tude, comparing favorably with that of anv of 
their older contemporaries. These gentlemen 
are well and favor.ibly known throughout 
this section as thoroughly reliable in all their 
dealings and transactions, and as thorough 



judges of value in horse flesh. They make a 
leading specialty of buying and selling, both 
on their ow n account and on commission, trot- 
ting and blooded stock, road, carriage, draft 
and saddle horses, and in this line transact a 
large and .steadily Increasing business. They 
also keep in stock tor livery purposes a fine 
lot of horses, carriages, buggies, ph:etons, light 
wagons, road carts, buck boards, etc, which 
they will let for business or pleasure purposes 
at the most reasonable rates. Mr. A. S. Cline 
is a native of this county and state, and has 
be<'n for the greater portion of his life engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, prior to embarking in 
his present line of business. Mr. John Plough, 
who is also "native here and to the manner 
born," was engaged in farming until the for- 
mation of the present partnership. 

C. H. JOHNSON, 

Drugs, Books, Stationery, Etc. 
Few pharmacies, even in the larger cities of 
the Union, present a more attractive appear- 
ance in their interior ap[)ointments and 
arrangements than the popular drug store of 
Mr. C. H. Johnson, at No. 22 Melodeon Block 
on Ruth St. The furniture, fixtures, shelving 
and cases are of the latest moilern style, and 
the stock carried, which is tuU and complete 
in all departments, embraces a general line of 
the purest and freshest drugs, medicines and 
chemicals, the standard proprietary remedies 
of the day, toilet articles, soaps, sponges and 
perfumery, fancy goods and druggists' sun- 
dries, school, blank and miscellaneous books, 
legal commercial and family stationery, school 
supplies, cigars, tobacco and miscellaneous 
merchandise in great variety pertaining to 
these two important branches of commerce. 
In the prescription department the purest 
ingredients only are employed, and special 
attention is devoted to the accurate preparation 
of physicians' prescriptions, lamily recipes and 
pharmaceutical compounds by skilled and 
educated pharmacists. This popular pharma- 
cy was originally established in 1S7; by 
Messrs. Spurrier & Armstrong, who were 
succeeded by N. H. Talbot, and he in turn by 
the present proprietor in 1SS3. The salesroom 
at the location above designated is 22x70 feet 
in dimensions, and two competent assistants 
are employed. The annual transactions at the 
present time will exceed $i2,cx30, and the trade 
which is derived from both city and country, 
is steadily increasing. Mr. C. H.Johnson Is a 
native of the State of Virginia, w here he was 
born in 1850. He has been a resident of this 
state since 1S61, and is a practical pharmacist 
and chemist of many years experience. For 
the past ten years Mr. Johnson has devoted 
his attention to the breeding of fine poultry. 
In this special branch of industry he is known 
and recognized by breeders and connoiseurs as 
a leading representative. In his model poultry 
yards are to be found the best varieties of im- 
ported fowls; the demand for his beautiful 
imported birds and eggs for setting purposes 
come trom every section of this country. 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



53 



MATT. R. HULL & CO., 
Hardware. 
Lender the generic and comprehen"!ive clas- 
sification of hardware in comniercial phrase- 
ology is included a great variety of articles 
composed entirely of iron and steel, or into the 
composition of which these or other of the 
baser metals enter to a greater or less extent. 
The purposes for which these articles are em- 
ployed are almost innimierable. embracing 
every department of the mechanical arts, of 
agricuhural, commercial, indu.strial and do- 
mestic life. Consequently the stock of a well 
regulated and properly conducted hardware 
establishmt nt is, paradoxical as it m.iy appear, 
of a homogenious as well as heterogenious 
character, and the business is one which 
requires for its successful prosecution a 
thorough comprehension ol the wants and 
requirements of all classes of the community. 
One of the mo-.t completely stocked and 
extensive establishments of this class in East 
ern Indiana is that of Messrs. Matt. R. Hull & 
Co., located on Ruth St., near Main, where 
may be found at all times a full and carefully 
selected stock of heavy and shelf hardware, 
cutlery, iron, nails, builders' materials, car- 
penters' and mechanics' tools and iinplements, 
agricultural tools, bent wood, churns, and 
miscellaneous merchandise, such as strictly 
pertains to this branch of commerce. This 
representative house was e-tablished in 1S74, 
and came into the possession of the present 
firm in 1883, at which time thev purchased the 
stock, stand, and good will ot Niessrs. Cook i; 
Son. The s.desroom is commodious and con- 
veniently arranged, covering a ground space 
of 24x125 feet, and two assistants are regularly 
employed in the sales department. The trade 
is principally local and derived from a radius 
of twenty miles in each direction, and the an- 
nual transactions will aggregate more than 
$25,000. Mr. Matt. R. Hull i"s a native of the 
State of Ohio, where he was born in 1848. He 
has been a resident of Indiana for the past 
twenty years, during the greater portion of 
which time he has been engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. 

THEODORE ABERCROMBIE, 
Merchant Tailor, Ruth Sr. 
When silks, velvets and laces were worn by 
the rich, poor men were proclaimed by their 
coats; but, at the present time, in the matter 
of costume, under our democratic form of gov- 
ernment, rich and poor are on a level. The 
day also when rich men only could have their 
clothing made to order, zi'as, but is no more; 
the day that poor men were compelled from 
necessity to wear ready-made and ill-fitting 
garments has also fled. Mr. Theodore Aber- 
crombie, the popular merchant tailor of Ruth 
St., is prepared to t'm-nish first-class fabrics for 
gentlemen's wear, either of foreign or domestic 
^ make, in all the fashionable and seasonable 
styles, and to manufacture to order faultless 
fits in suits or single garments, at prices which 
are not perceptibly higher than is frequently 



charged for shoddy goods of inferior workman- 
ship by irresponsible dealers in clothing made 
to fit no one in particul.ir. Mr. Abercrombie, 
who is a practical merchant tailor and artistic 
cutter, established his present business in this 
city in 1857, and for nearly a quarter of a cen- 
tury has maintained a hi;;h reputation for the 
superior excellence of his fits and the imiform- 
ly reliable character of his workmanship. His 
salesroom is 20x80 feet in dimensions, and his 
stock of piece goods for gentlemen's wear is 
complete in every department, selected with 
an express view to the requirements of his own 
trade, which will compare favorably with that 
of anv similar establishment in this section of 
the .State. Mr. Abercrombie is one ofour most 
enterprising inerchants and public-spirited 
citizens, and has, for the past six years, been 
an active and influential member of the school 
board in this city; his present term will make 
a period of six continuous years in that mu- 
nicipal body. He has also during his long 
residence here, taken a deep and active interest 
in the progress, growth, and development of 
our thriving municipality, and in all legitimate 
enterprises having for their aim and object the 
connnercial .idvancement and thrift of this 
community. 

LON. H. HAVENS, 

Groceries and Provisions, Main St. 

Unquestionably occupying a leading position 
in this branch of trade in this city is the house 
now conducted by Mr. Lon. H. llavens, 
whose annual transactions will considerably 
exceed $2^,000. This old established hou~e 
was founded in 1S65 by Mr. G. II. Havens, 
brother of the present proprietor, who com- 
menced business on a comparatively small 
scale one square above the present location, to 
which he removed in 1S72. In iSSi Mr. Lon. 
H. Havens purchased an interest in the busi- 
ness, which was conducted under the firm 
name and style of G. H. tV; L. H. Havens 
until 1S82, when the senior member of the firm 
retired. The premises occupied for sales and 
storage purposes comprise one floor iSxioo 
feet in dimensions, wi;h a basement 18x50 feet 
and an additional ware-room 18x40 feet. The 
stock carried embraces a general line of staple 
and fancy groceries, teas, cofl'ees, spices, sugars, 
syrups, soaps, canned goods, foreign and do- 
mestic fruits, cigars and manufactured tobac- 
cos, provisions, vegetables and country 
produce, queens and glassware, etc., while 
first-class goods and uniform lowest prices 
prevail. This house enjoys telephonic com- 
munication with all parts of the city ; a hor-e 
and wagon is kept for the prompt delivering 
of merchandise to patrons in all parts of the 
city. Mr. Havens, who is a native of this 
county, was for six years prior to embarking 
in his present business, engaged in the United 
States postal service with headquarters at 
Indianapolis. The house now conducted by 
him has a lucrative and established trade m 
the city and environs, which is steadily in- 
creasing with each succeeding season. 



54 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



W. H. MOFFETT & CO., 

Machinists, Gas, Steam and Pump 

Fitters. 
The gas, steam and pump fitting establish- 
ment ofW, H. MotVett A: Co. on Main St. 
possesses the amplest facilities for the prompt 
and satisfactorv execution of all work pertain- 
ing to these important tiepartmcnts of indus- 
try, and for the introduction of steam, gas or 
■water pipes into public buildings or private 
residences, upon sanitary and scientific princi- 
ples, at the most reasonable rates. This house 
was organized in October iSS;, under the firm 
name of MolVett \- Gregg. In April 1384, Mr- 
Gregg withdrew from the house and now oc- 
cupies tor manufacturing and work rooms a 
one-story building 16x40 teet in dimensions, 
with a sample room for the display of gas fix- 
tures, chandeliers, brackets, globes, shades, 
etc., on the second floor of Commercial IJlock. 
They also handle all descriptions of wrought 
iron piping, malieai)le and brass fittings, 
pumps, steam and gas fixtures, etc., and pay 
particular attention to general jobbing and 
repairing in all branchc-. Their trade is prin- 
cipally derived from this city and adjoining 
towns in Ku^h County, and their annual trans- 
actions reach from $S,ooo 10 $10,000. Mr. 
MotTett is a skilled mechanic and practical 
gas, steam and water fitter, thoroughly con- 
versant with all branches of the business in 
which he has had an extended experience prior 
to the establishment of his present business. 

EG AN & SON, 

Star Grocery, Co.mmercial Block. 
Among the latest accessions to the commer- 
cial enterprises of Ru^liville, may be especially 
mentioned the new family supply store, known 
as the Star Grocery, located in the Commer- 
cial Block on Main St., which was established 
under the most favorable auspices bv the firm 
ofEgan&Son, in January, 1SS4, ami which 
has already secured a trade entitling it to a 
prominent rank among the representative 
houses of the city in this special department 
of trade. The salesroom, which is fitted up in 
fir t-class modern style, is 20x70 feet in dimen- 
sions, and the stock carried which is full and 
complete in every department, comprises a 
general line of the choicest varieties of staple 
and fancy groceries, teas, coffees, spices, 
canned goods, foreign and domestic t'ruits, 
vegetables, provisions, table and kitchen sup- 
plies, cigars, tobaccos, notions and miscellane- 
ous merchandise, such as legitiTiiatelv pertains 
to the grocery and provision trade This is one 
ofthe most attractive and coinpletelv stocked 
establishments of its class in this section of the 
state, and its success has been fairly earned 
and richly merited. The individual members 
ofthe firm are Mr. D.J. and P. J. Egan, both 
of whom are natives of Ireland, but have 
resided in this state for the past twenty-two 
years. Mr. I). J. Egan, the senior member of 
the firm, conducts a first-class grocery store in 
anotlier part of the city, which is mentioned 
at length under its appropriate head in another 



portion of this volume. He has been identified 
with the grocery trade in this citv since 1865, 
and is one of our most hig!ilv esteemed citi- 
zens and successful business men. Mr. P. J. 
Egan, his son, prior to the formation of the 
present partnership, and the establishment 01 
the Star Grocery, was associated with his 
father in the same business, becoming practi- 
cally tamiliar with all its details and require- 
ments, and with tlie trade of this citv and 
its environ , from whence the patronage'of the 
new house is principally derived. 

JOSEPH L. FINLEY, 

St.;ri:RINTENDENT OF CoUNTV ASYI.C.M. 

Mr. Joseph L. Finley, the present Superin- 
tendent of the Rush County Asylum, was 
appointed to that responsible position bv the 
county comndssioners in Sejitenibcr, 1S77, and 
lias since that period discharged the duties 
thereof in a most acceptable manner. Mr. 
Finley is a native of Ohio, and was born in 
Adams County in 1S40. At the outbreak of 
the war of the rebellion, he was among the 
first to respond to the call of President Lincoln 
for troops, and in 1S61 enlisted as a member of 
the 36th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was 
discharged in the following February bv order 
ofthe Secretary ot War. In August 1862 he 
re-entered the service as a member of Co. F. 
Seventh Ohio Cavalry, which command was 
assigned to tlie Army ofthe Ohio under (Gen- 
eral Burnside, and rendered effective and valu- 
able aid to the cause of ihe Union arms in 
Tennessee. In November 1S63, during an 
engagement with the enemy near Rogersville, 
in the eastern portion of the state, he was cap- 
tured by the Confederate forces and taken to 
Belle Isle, where he was confined as a prison- 
er of war until March, 1S64, when, with others, 
he was transferred to Pemberton Prison, oppo- 
site the famous (or rather /«-famous) Libby 
Prison in the city of Richmond. Altera brief 
sojourn at this place, he was again removed to 
the prison pens of -\ndersonville, where he 
endured the hardships and privations of that 
notorious repro.ach to modern civilization and 
southern chivalry, until September, 1S64, 
when he was removed to Charleston, S. C, 
and with other Union prisoners placed under 
fire of Gilmore's arlilleiy for four davs and 
nights. From thence he was taken to Flor- 
ence, S. C, and retained until February 186^, 
when he was again removed to Wilmington, 
N. C. After four days the rebels were 
attacked by the Union lorces under General 
Terry, and retired, taking their prisoners with 
them to Goldsborough, .NI. C, where, four davs 
later, they were paroldi, taken to Wilmington 
and subsequently exchanged at North Eastern 
River, fourteen miles from that citv. After 
the exchange, Mr. Finley with impaired health 
and a broken cou'ititutinn, proceeded to An- 
napoli*, Md., and from thence to Colum- 
bus, Ohio, where he remained for seventeen 
d.ays in the military hospital. Me was sub.-e- 
quently transferred to Camp Denni>on Hos- 
pital, and on April 26th received a lurlough 



CITY OF RUSHSVILLE. 



58 



and returned to his home. He received an 
honorable discharge from service May :6th, 
1S65, and shortly afterward' removed to this 
citv, and was cluetly engaged in agricultural 
pursuits prior to his" acceptance of his present 
position. Mr. Finley has written a series of 
articles on prison life for the Republican of this 
city. 

RUSHVILLE ROAD CART CO., 

Carts, Blxkuoard.s, Buggics, Etc., S. 
E. Cor. Puhlic Square. 
The manufacture of road carts of improved 
varieties, buckboards, fine buggies, light wag- 
ons, etc., is one of the most prominent and 
important industries of Rui-hville. Oncofihe 
most widely and favorably known establish- 
ments is that which, under the style of Ihe 
Rushville Road Cart Co., is engaged espec- 
ially in the manufacture, upon an extensive 



features of practical utility which commend 
them to public consideration. In their reposi- 
tory are displayed a fine a^-ortment of carts, 
buckboards, buggies and carriages of their own 
manufacture, which they offer at prices which 
will defy successl'ul competition by any of their 
contemporaries in this section. The ayerat,'e 
number of hands employed in the different de- 
partments is from ten to fifteen ; and an average 
of sixty to eighty new vehicles were turned 
out each week d'uring last year, which meet 
with a ready sale, not only in this market, but 
throughout" the ijouthern States, and from 
New York City to Denver. Mr. Flechartisa 
native of this state and county, and prior to 
the organization of the present company, was 
engaged in a variety of commercial pursuits 
in this state and in ^lichigan. At theoutlireak 
of the war of the rebellion lie was among the 
fust to respond to the President's proclamation 




scale, of these now universally popular 
vehicles in a great variety of styles, adapted to 
a great variety of purposes. This company 
was organized 'in 1S82 by John Carroll, Joseph 
B. Frazier, B. F. Tingl'ey, and John Fleehart. 
On the 1st of March, 1SS4, Messrs. Carroll, 
Tingley and Fiazier retired from active par- 
ticipati'on in the busine.ss; but Mr. Carroll sub- 
sequently returned, and the individual mem- 
bers of the company, as now organized, are 
Messrs. Fleehart A: Carroll. The premises 
occupied for manufacturing purposes comprise 
commodious two-story buildings, one 25x80 
feet, and one 30x35 feet, including a ground 
space of S:;';;Xi65 feet in dimensions, sub- 
divided into four di^tinct departments, viz.; 
the wood-working, the black.smithing, the 
painting and the trimming departments, in 
each of which skilled and experienced work- 
men are emjiloyed under the immediate per- 
sonal supervision of the members of the tirm, 
who are practically conversant with all depart- 
ments of the business. The road carts manu- 
factured by this company are made under 
special letters patent issued by the United 
States Government in 1SS2, to C.irroU \- Fra- 
zier, and now controlled exclusively by this 
company. They possess new and important 



for troops, and in iS6i enlisted as a musician 
in the 27th Indiana Volunteers, and at the 
organization of the company was elected first 
lieutenant, and subsequently promoted to 
captain. He commanded his company with 
distinguished gallantry throughout the memo- 
rable marches, campaigns and engagements in 
which that gallant organization participated; 
and was actively engaged in the battles of 
Rocky Face Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain. 
His regiment was with General Sherman until 
the evacuation of Atlanta, when it was ordered 
to Rome, Georgia, and from thence to Nash- 
ville, Tennessee — participating in the pursuit 
of Hood's demoralized army to the Tennessee 
river. Thev subsequently rejoined Sherman 
at Gold.sbor'o, North Carolina'; and their last 
exchange of compliments with the enemy was 
an engagement near Kingston, North Caro- 
lina, just prior to the final overthrow of the 
rebellion. Captain Fleehart was mustered out 
of service, September 15th, 1S6;, after a I'aith- 
ful di.scharge of his military duties during 
almost the entire period of the civil war. Mr. 
John Carroll, his business associate, is a native 
of Ireland, and was born in County Kerry in 
1S50. He came to this country with his par- 
ents when but nine years of age, landing at 



56 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



New York January 14th, 1859. He went 
direct to Cincinnati, Ohio, and learned the 
trade of carriage blacksmith in that city, 
becoming an expert and accomplished work- 
man. He was for three years in the service of 
the United States Government in the capacity 
of teamster duriii}^ the war, and connected 
with the quartermaster's and commls>.ary de- 
partments in Kentucky and Tennessee. After 
his return to civil life, he was employed at his 
trade in Cincinnati until 1S72, when he became 
a resident of this city. 

HENRY ORMES & CO., 

Manuf'rs. of "Xfw Era" Wimd Mill 

AND DeALF.US in AGRICULTURAL IMPLE- 
MENTS, Pumps, ETC. 
Among the numerous varieties of wind mills 
which have of late years been placed upon the 
market, the nearest approach to absolute per- 
fection has been attained in tlie New Era mills 
manufactured only by the firm of Henry 
Ormes & Co., of Rushville. Retaining the 
best features and most important advantai,'es 
of other styles, the New Era combines there- 
with several improvements of great practical 
value, which are controlled exclusively by this 
firm. Among others, we may especially 
mention that it has a perfectly adjusted self- 
regulator; the longest shaft of any windmill 
made with two boxes, one at each end, the 
crank being in the centre with pumping rod 
attached, going direct to the pump, thus obvi- 
ating the employment of the intermediate pit- 
man, and numerous other important mechan- 
ical improvements, rendering it absolutely the 
best windmill made. This firm are also exten- 
sive dealers in chain pumps, water tanks, gas 
pipe, and the blest improved styles of agri- 
cultural imjilements, tools and machinery. 
They are exclusive agents in this city for the 
celebrated Piano and Walter A. Wood self- 
binders, the B. D. Buford wheel land side, 
light draft sulky plows and cultivators, Gibbs' 
improved walking plows, and numerous other 
improved devices of labor-saving machinery 
and implements for agricultural purposes. 
This representative firm was established in 
iSSo by Messrs. Ormes I'v: Sterns, who con- 
ducted the business until December, iSS;, 
when Mr. Sterns retired, and Mr. J. M. Felts 
was admitted to an interest in the business, 
under the present firm name and style. The 
premises occupied as salesrooms on Ruth St. 
are 20x70 feet in dimensions, in addition to 
which are their shops and ware rooms, located 
near the C. H. ^; D. R. R. depot. Mr. Henry 
Ormes is a native and life-long resident ot this 
county and state, and, in addition to his inter- 
ests in the above named business, is extensive- 
ly engaged in agricultural pursuits, being one 
of the largest and most successt"iil farmers in 
this county. Mr. J. M. Felts is a native of 
Kentucky, and came to this state about seven 
years ago. He is a skilled practical mechan- 
ician, and has made several important and 
valuable inventions of great practical utility. 



J. T. KITCHEN & CO., 

Furniture Dealers and Under- 
takers. 
This well known house is located on Main 
St., the principal business thoroughfare of 
Rushville. It was formerly established under 
the firm name of Stewart cSJ Kitchen. In 1878 
Mr. Kitchen, the present owner, took entire 
control of the bvisiness. From a comparatively 
small beginning a trade has been established 
w hich, at the present time, will exceed $jq,ooo 
per annum and is steadily increasing. The 
premises occupied comprise two entire floors 
ofa spacious and commodious brick building' 
on Main St. 20x124 f^^t in dimensions. In 
addition to the members of the firm who devote 
their personal attention to the business, one 
assistant is employed. This house is the lead- 
ing one of its class in Rushville. The stock 
carried is full and complete, comprismg as it 
does, a general line of the finer and common 
grades of furniture, including upholstered and 
plain goods, parlor, library, and dining room 
and chamber sets, kitchen furniture, tables, 
bureaus, chairs and i,'eneral house furnishing 
supplies pertaining to this special department 
of trade. In the undertaking department is 
carried a fine stock of coffins, caskets, burial 
cases, shrouds and undertakers' supplies of 
every description. The house possesses the 
most ample facilities for undertaking the gen- 
eral management of funeral obsequies in 
accordance with the wishes of the friends and 
tamilies of the deceased, or with the require- 
ment and rituals of secret societies and organi- 
zations. Messrs. J. T. and M. C. Kitchen, the 
individual members of the firm, are natives and 
life-long residents of this state, who have, by a 
steady, honorable business career, secured the 
confidence and esteem of the public. 



SAMUEL TEMPLIN, 

Challenge Bakfry and Restaurant. 

In adopting the designating title of "Chal- 
lenge Bakery," Mr. Samuel Templin confi- 
dently and unhesitatingly flung his banners to 
the breeze, challenging iiis contemporaries to 
successful competition in the quality, excel- 
lence, and price of fine family bread, cakes, 
pies, confectionerv, pastry, etc. His model 
establishment, which is located on Main St., 
occupies one floor 20x70 feet in dimensions, 
and is one of the most eligibly situated and 
most aUr.ictive stands on this busy thorough- 
fare. In the sales department may be found 
at all times a choice assortment of the best 
varieties of bread, cakes, pies, etc., of his own 
manufacture, choice French and American 
confectionery, caramels, bon bons, etc., foreign 
and domestic fruits, nuts, etc., cigars, tobacco 
and fancy articles in great variety in the bak- 
ery and confectionery line. In connection 
with this branch of the business are finely 
furnished and tastefully arranged parlors, 
where oysters and ice cream are served during 
their appropriate seasons, and lunches and 
refreshments at all hours. In the manufactur- 
ing department seven barrels ot choice flour 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



57 



are used weekly In the manufacture of the 
specialties for which Mr. Tempiin lias acquired 
a more tlian local reputation. Mr. Tempiin 
who is a native of the State of Pennsylvania, 
was born In 1S43, and has been a resident of 
this state since 1S67. He is a practical baker 
and confectioner, and is thorouyhlv conversant 
with all branches of the business. During the 
war of the rebellion, and bet'ore attaining his 
majority, Mr. Teniplin was very patriotic and 
desirous of enlerin<5 the service of his country 
in defence of the old flag, and the perpetuity 
of the Union, and enlisted three separate 
tjmes in different organizations, but his release 
was twice secured by his parents on the 
grounds of minority. He however served for 
four months as a member of Co. K, 4Sth Regi- 
ment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
received an honorable discharge at the expira- 
tion of that time. 

J. H. SPURRIER, M. D., 

PlIYSICI A.N AND Sl'RGEON; OfFICE MaIN" 

St.; Rk.sidexce Cor. Noiile and Mor- 
gan Sts. 
Dr. J. II. Spurrier, one of our most accom- 
plished physicians and surgeons, now engaged 
in the practice of his profession at Rushville, is 
a native of Mason County, Kentucky, where 
he was born in iS;y. Alter completing his 
literary education, he engaged in the study of 
medicine and surgerv at Murrislown, Indiana, 
in 1S5:, with Dr. J. G. Wolf He commenced 
the practice of medicine in connection with his 
preceptor, but shortly afterwards removed to 
Marion, where he remained for four years, 
subsequently locating at Manilla, where for 
six years he enjoyed a lucrative and successful 
practice. In iS6j he entered the service of the 
United States, and received a commission as 
assistant surgeon of the i6th Regiment Indi- 
ana Volunteers. He was hubsequentlva>signed 
to duty as surgeon in charge of the military 
hospital at Memphis, Tennessee; but owing to 
impaired health and physical disability, was 
compelled in January, 1S63, to tender his res- 
ignation which was accepted and he returned 
to this city. Recognizing his ability and emi- 
nent qualitications for the position. Governor 
Morton requested him, two weeks after his 
return, to accept the position of special sani- 
tary agent for the state at Paducah, Kentucky, 
which he filled for about two weeks, and com- 
pleting his duties at this point, was assigned to 
duty at Memphis in the same position. Here 
he was stationed tor about four months, per- 
forming the arduous duties devolving upon 
him with a marked degree of success. At the 
expiration of this period he returned to Indi- 
ana, and, although in poor health, he devoted 
his utmost energies to the practice of medi- 
cine and surgery among the sick and disabled 
soldiers until .March. 1S64, when the "great 
War Governor" of Indiana tendered him a 
commission as surgeon of the 123d Indiana 
Volunteers with the rank of ^iajor, and 
strongly urged his acceptance thereof. Dr. 
Spurrier, although still suffering Irom illness 



occasioned by his services in camp and hospi- 
tal, accepted the position, and ujion the reor- 
ganization of the First Division :!3d Army 
Corps, he was assigned by general orders irom 
department headquarters to the responsible 
position of surgeon in chiet of that division, 
in which position he served with distinction 
until the close of the war. Since his return to 
civil lite he has been actively engaged in the 
practice of medicine in this city, and graduated 
from the Indiana Medical College at Indian- 
apolis in the class of 1S77-S. 



W. W. CARR, 

Harness, Saddles, Etc., Main St. 
More than half a century ago, when the 
now pro.sperous and progressive city of Rush- 
ville was but an obscure wes'tcrn hamlet, 
almost on the outskirts of civilization ; long 
before the shriek of the iron horse had waked 
the echoes of the primeval forests of Indiana, 
or the onward march of human progress had 
crossed our pathless prairies with its present 
net-work of iron rails, there came to this county 
with his parents, the subject of the present 
sketch, Mr. \V. W. Carr, then a boy but four 
years of age, from his native State of Ken- 
tucky, where he was born in 1S24. His early 
lite was not unlike that of the _\ouths of our 
hardy pioneers of that early period, who, amid 
hardships, privations and ditficulties, of which 
the present generation can have no adequate 
conception, carved out their own fortunes and 
their own destinies, boldly asserting in their 
independence and native strength of character 
that "nothing succeeds like success." Mr. 
Carr, when yet a young man, learned the trade 
of saddler and harness maker, and in 1S4S 
commenced business in this town on a very 
limited scale, but sufKciently large to meet the 
demands and requirements of that period. He 
has been uninterruptedly engaged in the same 
line of business since that time, his trade 
steadily increasing iVom year to year, growing 
with the growth and prospering with the pros- 
perity which has attended this settlement Irom 
its iniancy to the present time. By industry, 
frugality and strict attention to his business, 
which has ever been conducted in strict 
accordance with the true principles of com- 
mercial honor and mercantile integrity, with a 
conscientious fulfillment of all contracts and 
obligations, he has secured a handsome com- • 
petency and an honored name. He is owner 
of one of the finest business blocks on Main 
St., and also considerable other real and per- 
sonal property in other sections of the city; 
but still devotes his personal attention to the 
business in which he has been engaged ibr 
nearly four decades. The premises occupied 
for sales and manufacturing purposes are cen- 
trally and eligibly located on the principal 
business thoroughfare, and his stock, which is 
full and comi)lete in all departments, embraces 
fine single and double harness of his own 
manufacture, saddles, collars, bridles, whips, 
blankets, robes, halters, combs, brushes, horse 
clothing, stable supplies and turf goods gener- 



58 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



ally. Special attention is devoted to repairing, 
and all work sent out is warranted, both as to 
material, workniansliip and price. In connec- 
tion with the business above mentioned, Mr. 
Carr is the local agent in this city tor the Ad- 
ams and American Express Companies. 

MOCK & HINCHMAN, 

Planing Mills; Contractors and 
BuiLDEUs, Manl-f'rs. of Extf.xsion 
Tables, Taislk .Slidk.s, Staii!.s, Dixjrs, 
Sash, Blinds, Finished Llmuer, Eic. 
This firm are lessees of a fine and thorouLjhly 
equipped planing; mill, situated nciir the line of 
the C. H. A: I. Railroad track, where they enjoy 
the amplest facilities for ethciently conducting 
the various branches of business which 
engages their attention. The buildings and 
ground space occupied are 165x165 feet in 
dimensions, and in their operations they fur- 
nish employment to an avera;;e tbrce of" from 
fifteen to thirty-five men. The mill is equipped 
■with newest improved labor-saving machinery, 
the motive power of which is supplied by a 
fine thirty-five horse power engine and boiler. 
In addition to their extensive operations as 
carpenters, contractors and builders, in which 
they enjoy unsurpassed facilities tor the 
prompt and eftective execution of all work in 
this line, this firm arc manufacturers of 
stairs, doors, sash, blinds, flooring, and are 
prepared to take contracts for supplying car- 
penters and builders with all kinds of building 
materials. This firm also make a prominent 
specialty of the manufacture of extension 
tables and table slides, in which they transact 
a business which will bear favorable compari- 
son with anv contemporaneous establishment 
in Eastern Indiana. These tables, in addition 
to their beauty, solidity and durability, unsur- 
passed in the market, embrace superior 
advantages in the patent slide; which is manu- 
factured exclusively at the present by this 
company, which commend them to the special 
consideration of both dealers and consumers 
in all sections of the country. This superior 
adjunct to the table, known as Bowen's Patent 
Excelsior Table Slide, a cut of which is here 
(bowen's pate.nt.) 




;.ry 



<!^ 



given, possesses the advantages of durability, 
with the most simple and ingenious construc- 
tion, which renders its working so easy that a 
child may easily adjust it. The tables are 
manufactured and sold with slides, or the slides 
are separately supplied to meet the require- 
ments of various sizes and styles of tables, the 
demand for which extends already to various 
portions of this state, Ohio, Kentucky, and 
other remote sections of the Union. The firm 
are able to quote prices \yhich make it of inter- 
est to those interested to open correspondence 



with them. The premises now occupied by 
this firm was originally erected and established 
in 1S76 by Mr. Samuel Austin. In iSboalease 
was taken by the firm of J. W. Mock >\: Co , 
who were shortly after succeeded by the pres- 
ent firm, the individual members of which are 
C. M. Mock and A. B. Hinchman. Mr. C. M. 
Mock is a native of this state, and was born in 
Fayette County in iS::8. He has been inti- 
mately associated with this branch of bu-^iness 
since 1S67. He was formerly interested in two 
large planing mills in this city, one of which 
was destroyed by fire in iS6<; and the other in 
1871. Though sutVering considerable loss, he 
was possessed of that material which sur- 
mounts all difllculties and soon achieves the 
front position in the ranks of business life. Mr. 
.\ . B. Hinciiman is a native of Rush County, 
this state, and was, duriug his early lite and 
for many years, prominently engaged in agri- 
cultural pur.suits. He subsequently engaged 
in livery business in this city, prior to becom- 
ing associated with the present enterprise, and 
is widely and favorably known in this and ad- 
joining counties. 



A. P. ALEXANDER, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries. 
In the compilation of authentic and reliable 
data of the diversified business interests of the 
prosperous and progressive city of Rushville, 
it is found that the grocery trade occupies a 
prominent rank, and among the leading houses 
engaged in this important branch of our mod- 
ern commercial system, may be especially 
mentioned as worthy of more than ordinary 
con"-ideralion, that conducted by Mr. A. P. 
Alexander, whose salesrooms, 20x160 leet in 
dimen>ions, are centrally and eligibly located 
on Ruth St., fitted up in modern metropolitan 
style and stocked with an admirably selected 
assortment of the choicest varieties of staple 
and fancy groceries, teas, roasted and ground 
cotTees, pure spices, canned goods, fruits, vege- 
tables, provisions, tarin and dairy produce, and 
miscellaneous merchandise of every descrip- 
tion, pertaining to this special branch of trade, 
classified in commercial phraseology under 
the comprehensive head of notions and gro- 
cers' sundries. This representative house was 
originally established by Mr. W. T. Brann, 
Mho was succeeded by R. W. Patton, who 
conducted the bu^ine-s until 1SS2, when he 
di<.posed of his interest in the stock and stand 
to the present proprietor. Mr. Alexander de- 
votes his personal attention to the business, 
and employs three assistants in the sales 
department. His trade is derived from the city 
and surrounding towns, and his annual trans- 
actions at the presi'nt time will considerably 
exceed $30,000. Mr. Alexander is a native of 
this county and was born in 1847. He has 
been I'or several years actively engaged in 
mercantile pursuits, and under his enterprising 
and energetic management, the house con- 
ducted by him has attained the prominent po- 
sition which it now occupies among the leading 
establishments of its class in this county. 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



59 



A. G. MAUZY, 

Grain Dealer. 
Members oltlie Mauzv fnniilv have been for 
-many years so prominently identified with the 
grain interests ol'this section as extensive biiv- 
-ers and shippers that no history of Rush 
County can bo considered complete or reliable 
■without iVeqiient reference to them collec'ivelv 
-or individually, since at 0[ie time the entire 
grain interests of Rush County were controlled 
by brothers in this t'amilv, where sliipnients 
at one period a^grctjated more than 1,000,000 
bushels annually. One of the most extensive 
-dealers and shipjiers at the jiresent time is Mr. 
A. G. Mauzy, proprietor of the mammotli 
elevator which was erected in 1S50 by Mr 
Louis Mattocks. He was succeeded i'n this 
business by Mr. W. C. Maui'v, he in turn bv 
Murray, Perkins & Co., this 'firm by Mavizy 
A: Bro., and in iSSo the present enterprising 
proprietor assumed the management and con- 
trol of this old established house. The ori<;inal 
elevator was 30x70 feet in dimensions, but in 
iSSo Mr. .Mauzy erected an addition 40x80 feet 
in size, giving at tlie present timean aggreaate 
storage capacity of So,ooo bushels. Gas 
•engines are employed for hoisting and dis- 
charging grain, and the an'.plest facilities are 
■enjoyed for tiie successt'ul prosecution of the 
extensive business now conducted by Mr. 
Mauzy, who handles annually not ies's than 
150,000 bushels, shipping largely to Toledo, 
Ohio, and lo the principal grain centres of the 
Eastern States, Mr. ^iauzv, who is a native 
of Kentucky, has been a resident of Rushville 
for the past fifty-five years, during which 
period he has been prominently identitied with 
the grain interests of tnis section and the com- 
•mercial thrift of the conimunitv, in the growth 
-and development of which he has played a 
•most important part, as one of our most ener- 
getic and successful merchants. 

"V. B. BODINE & SON, 

Boots, Snots and Rui-.iiers. 
For more than a quarter of a centurv, the 
name of Hodine has been so intiinatelv identi- 
fied with the boot and shoe tradeof Riishville, 
as to be indissolubly associated in the minds 
of our citizens with tliat special department of 
our local commerce. In 1S55, Mr, \'. }!. Bo- 
dine, who had previously been en>.;aged in the 
same branch of business at other points for 
more than seven years, commenced in this 
city on a comparatively small scale, the busi- 
ness which has since been so successfully con- 
. ducted by him, and by the present firm' of V. 
/B. Bodine \ Son, which firm dates its incep- 
tion since 1S74. The senior member retired 
from active business life tor about three years, 
but resumed his place in the firm in 1S77'. '"he 
premises occupied by this representative firm 
.are located in the spacious brick building on 
Ruth St. near Main, where a finely arranged 
salesroom 19x81 leet in dimensions'is tilled to 
•repletion with an admirably selected line of 
boots, shoes and rubbers for ladies, gentle- 
imen's and children's -wear, from the leading 



manufacturers of the Union, selected with an 
express view to the requirements of the better 
class of city and country trade. This firm also 
represents, as exclusive agents in this city, the 
well known Hartford and Walker boots. ' The 
stock carried comprises full and unbroken 
lines of the best boots and shoes made, and the 
prices are uniformly the lowest consistent 
with good goods — first-class material, reliable 
workmanship, and honorable dealing; and the 
annual transactions of this popular house will, 
at the present time, considerably exceed $1;,- 
000. Mr. \'. B. Bodine, who' is one of our 
pioneer citizens and most successful mer- 
chants, is a native of the State of Ohio, where 
he was born in iS;6 He has resided in this 
state since 1836, and been prominently identi- 
fied with the growth, progress and commercial 
thrif't of our progressive city for nearly a third 
of a century. He has been elected by his fel- 
low citizens to the responsible positions of 
school trustee and township trustee, in each of 
which he has served for tw'o terms, and is at 
the present time, treasurer of the East Hill 
Cemelery of this place. His son and business 
associate, Mr. V. C. T5odine, is a native of Cin- 
cinnati, but a resident of this state since child- 
hood. 



COX & PCGH, 

Dri'goist.s and Chemists, Main St. 
Possessing a thorough and practical knowl- 
edge of the principles of chemistry and phar- 
macy in all their branches, acquired during an 
extended experience of more than ten years, 
Messrs. Co.x iV Pugh the enterprising proprie- 
tors of the popular pharmacy and drugstore 
on the west side of the public square, opposite 
the court house, otl'er to the citizens of Rush- 
ville and its environs, inducements in the 
purity, excellence and reliability of the mer- 
chandise constituting their stock in trade, to 
the selection of which they give their personal 
attention. Their salesroom, which is fitted up 
in modern metropolitan style, with all the lat- 
est improvements in furniture and fixtures, is 
24x80 feet in dimensions, and the stock carried 
embraces a general line ,of pure drugs and 
chemicals, proprietary medicines, toilet 
articles, perfumery, soap, sponges, combs, 
brushes, fancy articles, paints, oils, varnishes, 
dye-stuffs, chewing and smoking tobacco, 
Havana and domestic cigars, wines and liquors 
for medicinal purposes, druggists' sundries in 
great variety, and miscellaneous merchandise, 
such as legitimately pertains to a first-class, 
well regulated estabh'shment of this descrip- 
tion. A leading specialty is made of the pre- 
scription department, and of the accurate 
preparation of pharmaceutical compounds of 
every description, family recipes and physi- 
cian's prescriptions. "The present firm was 
organized in November 1S74, and the premises 
first occupied were located directly opposite 
what is now known as the Windsor Hotel. In 
1S75 they removed to their present commodi- 
ous and centrally located quarters, wherethev. 
have established a trade which will compare 



60 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



favorably with that of any similar contempor- 
aneous house in Eastern Indiana. The indi- 
vidual members of this representative firm, 
Messrs. R. W. Cox and F. IJ. I'ugli, are both 
natives of this city, and are thoroughly quali- 
fied bv education and experience for the busi- 
ness in which they are entjagcd. Mr. Piigh 
was elected treasurer ol this city in 1S79, and 
filled that responsible position for one term. 

HAVENS lS£ WILSON, 

Agricultural Implf.ments and Seeds, 
Ruth St. — Se.xto.v Bi ilding. 
Among the leading establi^liments of East- 
ern Indiana enjiatjed in the ?ale of the leading 
varieties of agricultural implements, machin- 
erv, grain, garden, grass and tield seeds, etc., 
is that of Messrs. ilavcns vV Wilson, located in 
the Sexton building on Ruth St., where, in a 
brick building .'0x70 I'eet in dimensions, with 
ample yard space, this firm cairies a full line 
of the standard machino, including among 
others, the Champion light binders and mow- 
ers, wheat drills, Hoo>ier corn drills, liayton 
Champion steel plows, cultivators, etc. ; Cham- 
pion bob tail sulkies. Red Jacket and Hamilton 
bteel plows. South Bend plows, Hoosier Boy 
cultivators, corn planters, check rowers, the 
Reeves & Co. straw stacker, and a variety of 
other improved implements, seeds, etc. This 
firm was established in the spring of 1 883, and 
although their trade is confined principally to 
this county, they have secured a large and 
steadily increasing patronage. Tiie individual 
members of the firm, Mr. G. H. Havens, and 
Mr. R. E. Wilson, are both natives of this 
county and stale, and have been tor many 
years promineiitly identified with the commer- 
cial and industrial intcre-.ts of this section. 
Mr. Havens, prior to tlie formation of the 
present partnership, was tor nearly two decades 
engaged in the general grocery trade in this 
city, and Mr. Wilson wa- tbrmerly proprietor 
of a saw mill at Arlington, and engaged in the 
lumber and grain trade. 

J. C. BOYD, 

Carriage Manufactory, Specialty 
OF Carriage Basket Work, South 

Main St. 
The carriage works and repository of Mr. J. 
C. Boyd demand conspicuous consideration 
and favorable mention among the local indus- 
tries and commercial enterprises of this thriv- 
ing and progressive city. The premises occu- 
pied for sales and manufacturing purposes are 
located on South Main St., in buildings erected 
by Mr. Boyd expressly lor the purposes for 
which they are employed, in the I'al! 01" isS^at 
which time the present enterprise was ii.augu- 
rated. The main building is a commodious 
and conveniently arranged structure 32x60 
feet in dimensions two stories high. The iVont 
portion of the first iloor is occupied as general 
salesroom and repository, with a work room 
in the rear tor wood work, while the black- 
smithing department is in a separate building. 
The entire second floor is utilized for the 



painting and trimming departments. Mr. Boyd 
manufactures for stock and to order every 
vai ifty of fine carriages, buggies, light wagons, 
etc., and is exclusive agent in this county lor 
the Hceb Carriage \Vorks of Fayetteville, 
Fayette County, carrying a full line of their 
products, which, by special arrangement, he is 
enabled to ofl'er at lactory prices. He also 
makes a prominent specialty of general repair- 
ing, painting, trimming, etc. 

CARRIAGE HASKET WORK. 
The establishment of Mr. Boyd has per- 
fected arrangements tbrgiving special attention 
to the manufacture ofcarriage basket or willow 
work. The advantages possessed by these are 
in giving lightness, coolnes-, beauty and con- 
venience to vehicles, for seats or for pliaetor> 
bodies, etc., and this feature alone will com- 
mend these works to liberal public considera- 
tion both at home and abroad. Tliey guaran- 
tee all work, both in elegance, beauty, and 
durability; while in their method of construc- 
tion, there is a great saving which is an 
important item to consumers. Mr. Boyd, who 
is a thoroughly practical and experienced car- 
riage maker, conversant with all deparlments 
of tlie business, is a native of this county, and 
learned his trade at Cincinnati, Ohio. He first 
embarked in business on his own account in 
MiUroy, subsequently removing to Greens- 
burg iii this state in i'S6o. returning to Millroy 
the lolUnving year. In 1S7S he came to this 
city, and accepted the superinlendcncy ot the 
"C" Spring Cart Factory, which po.-.ition he 
retained tor about one year, when the works 
were destroyed by fire, after which he inaugu- 
rated his present business enterprise. 

H. S. STEPHENS, 

Photographer; South Side Ruth St. 
The art gallery and photograph rooms of 
Mr- II. S. Stephens, on the south side of Ruth 
St., present an inviting appearance in the fine 
spvcimens of solar pictures and works of art 
which adorn the walls of his reception rooms. 
This gallery was formerly conducted by Mr. 
Tames Mcintosh, and ua- originally located at 
"llie corner of M..in and Elizabeth .Sts. It came 
into the possession of Mr. Stephens in 1874, 
who carried on business at the old stand until 
December 15th, 1S79, when he removed to his 
present quarters, where a floor space of 20x54 
ieet in dimensions is occupied for reception 
parlors, operating and fini>hing rooms, studio, 
etc. All the latest improvements in cameras, 
and scenic elfects are employed, and a tine 
light is obtained for the producti<m of fine 
likenesses in cither clear or cloudy weather. 
Mr. Stephens executes tlie best photographic 
work of every description, linishing pictures 
as desired, in India ink, oil or water colors, and 
makes a specialty ol artistic portraiture, copy- 
ing and enlarging in all branches of the art. 
He also carries in stock a choice assortment of 
picture frames in a great variety of styles, for 
the benefit of !iis patrons. Mr. .Stephens is a 
native of Franklin County, this slate, and was 
i born in 1S51. He was first eng.aged in the 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



61 



practice ofphoto:;raphy al Richmond, Indiana, 
in 1S7;, and during the past twelve rears has 
•devoted his attention exclusivelv to this inter 
-esting and important art, keeping pace with 
all moder improvements. 

J. P. FAIRLEY, 

Livery and Feed Stable; South 

Main St. 
As the oldest livery stand, feed and sale 
stables in Rushville, that now conducted hy 
Mr. J. I*. Fairley, near the Grand Hotel, claim 
recoi;nition. In January, 1SS3, Mr. Fairley 
purchased the slock, stand and good will of 
Mr. A. S. Cline, and under his judicious man- 
agement a new impetus has been given to the 
business of this old established stand. The 
premises occupied are 66x165 feet in dimen- 
sions, with a stabling capacity for the accom- 
modation of one hundred and sixty horses at 
one time. From fourteen to twenty fine road 
and carriage horses arc kept for livery pur- 
poses, with stylish and comfortable carriages, 
buggies, phaetons, light wagons, etc., for 
pleasure or business purposes, at the most 
reasonable rates. Mr. Fairley makes a promi- 
nent specialty of buying and selling horses, 
blooded stock, family, road, draft and saddle 
horses, on his own account or on commission. 
He is at the present time owner of tlie fine 
blooded stallion known as Roger Hanson 
■with a trotting record of 2 :2^^^ ; and has also 
several excellent horses of minor note in his 
■well regulated stables. Mr. Fairley, who is a 
native of this county and state, was born in 
1836. He has traveled quite extensively in the 
capacilv of commercial agent tor several of the 
leading' metropolitan houses, and was also en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits on his own 
account in Indianapolis and Cincinnati. Pre- 
vious to his removal to this city in 1872, he 
carried on a wholesale tobacco house at Indian- 
apolis, and since embarking in his present 
enterprise, has made many .additions to his 
already large and influential circle of business 
acquaintances. 

MRS. R. H. LEWIS, 

Millinery, Main St. 
The admirable taste exhibited by Mrs. R. 
H. Lewis in the selection ot' her stock, and the 
artistic ability and skill evinced by her and her 
assistants in the trimming departments, have 
been duly appreciated by the ladies of Rush- 
ville and vicinity, who have accorded by 
mutual consent to her popular millinerv par- 
lors on Main St. the verdict of universal 
approval as the recognized headquarters in this 
city for fashionable millinery, and the latest 
styles and novelties in ladies' head-wear. Mrs. 
Lewis, who is a native of the .State of Ohio, 
bas been a resident of this st.ate tor the past 
fifteen years, during which entire period she 
bas been engaged in the millinerv business, 
establishing her present emporium of fashion 
in September, 1SS3. I''^'' stock embraces at 
all times the latest styles of hats, bonnets, 
ribbons, laces, feathers, lips, plumes, birds, 



flowers, wreaths, buds and ornaments, received 
direct from the leading metropolitan modistes. 
She is in constant receipt of patiern hats and 
boimels and the latest fashion plates in stvles 
and shapes, which she is prepared to duplicate 
at short notice and upon the most reasonable 
terms. While making a prominent specialty 
of the latest Parisian and New York stvles, 
she does not lose sight of the fact that different 
faces, complexions and figures require special 
effects and modifications, and her rare taste 
and judgement enables her to offer judicious 
advice and counsel to her patrons in making 
their selections, which has added largelv to her 
popularity with the la<lies of culture and 
refinement, who appreciate the beauties of 
harmonious blending of colors to produce a 
pleading result. 

N. WEEKS, 

Meat Market. 
The old reliable meat market now located 
on Main .St., a few doors south of the post 
ollice, was originally established in 1S77 on 
the opposite side of the street. In 1S79 the 
present conveniently arranged building was 
erected by .Vllen, Weeks i: Co., and occupied 
by them as a meat inarket until i8Sj, when 
Mr. N. Weeks purchased the interest of his 
partners, and has since conducte I the business 
on hi> own account. The salesroom, which is 
2.:x40 feet in dimensions, is fitted up with all 
the modern conveniences, with a fine refrig- 
erator for tiie preservation of meats. Mr. 
Weeks uses monthly about thirtv fine beeves, 
and a proportionate number of smaller ani- 
mals, and manufactures in season, sausages, 
bologna, etc. Mr. Weeks is a native of Henrv 
County, Indiana, and wa^ born in 1841. He 
learned the trade of carriage trimmer, when a 
3-oung man, but was among the first to respond 
to the call of his country for troops, during the 
dark days of the civil war, enlisting in iS6i,as 
a memtjer of Co. D, 36th Regiment Indiana 
Vohmteer Infanlry. This regiment, which 
was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, 
rendered inost valuable and elTecti\e service 
to the Union cause. At the battle of Shiloh 
Mr. Weeks, while in the discharge ofhisdutv, 
received a severe gunshot wound in the leYt 
thigh, incapacitating him from further active 
service. He was sent home three days after, 
and for eight months walked on crutches. He 
was honorablv disch.arged in 1S62 for disa- 
bility. 



NEW YORK MILLINERY .STORE. 

Mrs. John Kennard, Main- and Ruth 

Streets. 
The popular New York millinery store, lo- 
cated on the second fioor, corner of Main and 
Ruth Sts., was established at its present loca- 
tion in iS7qby Mrs.John Kennard who has suc- 
cessfully conducted the business since that ■ 
time with a steadily increasing patronage from I 
the ladies of this and adjoining counties. The ' 
elegants uite of rooms occupied for sales and j 
trimming purposes constitute one of the prin 



62 



STATE OF INDIANA. 






h^ 



cipal attractions of Rushville to the ladies, for 
here are displayed in great profusion the latest 
Parisian and New York styles in hats and 
bonnets, together with an admirably selected 
assortment of the latest noyelties in flowers, 
buds, \yreaths, feathers, plumes, tips, birds and 
brilliant plumages, ribbons in almost endless 
variety of shades and styles, laces, ruches, 
trimmings, ornaments and a great variety of 
millinery goods especially adapted to the re- 
quirements of tlie better class of trade. 

A. J. SARGENT, 

Photograph F.R, Rlth St., Over 

Hull's Hardware Store. 
At the attractive art gallery and photograph 
rooms of Mr. A. J. Sargent on Ruth St., over 
Hull's hardware store, are exhibited some 
admirable specimens of his handiwork in pho- 
tography, finished in India ink, oil and water 
colors, which will not suffer by critical com- 
parison with similar eiVorls in the leading 
metropolitan galleries. Mr. Sargent com- 
menced business in this city during the Cen- 
tennial year, in a car located on a corner ofthe 
public square, and shortly after removed to a 
vacant lot on the opposite side of tlie street. 
In 1S79 he fitted up his present comnaodious 
and conveniently arranged galleries, where 
with a strong, clear, northern light, he is 
enabled to produce in bright or cloudy weather, 
admirable likenesses, single or in groups. His 
reception, oper.iling and finishing rooms are 
fitted up in the most approved style, with all 
the latest improvements pertaining to the 
mechanical department. To meet tlie require- 
ments of his steadily increasing trade, which 
is derived not only iVom the city, but also from 
this and adjoining counties in Ohio and Indi- 
ana, Mr. Sargent has deemed it necessary to 
enlarge his pre-ent quarters, and when the 
contemplated improvements are completed, 
this gallery will rank among the finest in this 
section ofthe West. In Mr. Sargent's gallery 
may be found two groups ofthe early settlers 
of this county, who had been residents of the 
county in 1S77, (at which time the pictures 
were taken) over thirty- five years, and were 
all over fifty years of age, embracing in the 
groups over three hundred and seventy-five 
persons. Mr. Sargent is a native of Ware, 
New Hampshire, where he was born in 1S29. 
He removed to New York State with his 
parents when but a child, and his early educa- 
tion was acquired in that state. He was for 
several years engaged in railroading, and for 
some time employed as an engineer on the S. 
&0. R. R. In rS6o he first engaged in the 
photographic business, shortly afterwards 
establi.'-hing a gallery at Indianapolis. He 
subsequently removed to St. Louis, returning 
to this state in 1870. With an experience ot 
nearly a quarter of a century, during which 
time he has made photography a study, and 
kept fully informed ujion all the improvements 
and new inventions which have been intro- 
duced from time to time. 



HAYS & MEGEE, 

Surgeon Dkntists. 
Mechanical dentistry is one ofthe triumphs 
of our time and country. Not only is the 
present e.xcellence in the art a comparatively- 
recent achievement, but it is more thoroughly 
understood in this country than elsewhere, 
while the improvements which have been 
introduced in the several departments of 
operative dentistry and surgery — the u.se of 
harmless aniesthetics, and the application of 
delicate instruments and appliances may be 
mainly credited to the skill and genius of 
American dental surgeons. Among the most 
skillful and accomplished prolessors of this 
important science in this section, we invite the 
attention of our readers to Drs. Hays & Me- 
gee, whose ollices and dental parlors are loca- 
ted over Matt. R. Hull's hardware establish- 
ment on Ruth St., where, with all the modern 
improvements in both departments of mechan- 
ical and operative dentistry, thev enjoy 
unequalled lacilities for the successful prose- 
cution of all branches of the business. Dr. 
Hays established an otlice in this city about 
ten years ago, removing to his present finely 
furnished jiarlors in 1578. In March, 1SS4, 
Dr. Megee was admitted to an interest in the 
business, under the present firm name and 
style; and the success which has attended the 
efforts of these gentlemen has been richly 
nierited and fairly earned by the superior ex- 
cellence of their work. Dr. Hays is a native 
of Boston, where his literary education was 
acquired. He subsequently was engaged in 
the drug business prior to commencing the 
practice of dental surgery, in which he has had 
many years practical experience. Dr. Megee 
is a native of this state and county, and was 
educated in this city. In itiSj he entered the 
Ohio Dental College, at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
trom which he graduated yrith high honors in 
1SS4, shortly after, becoming a member of the 
present firm. 

J. E. MERRILL, 

HAR.VES.S, Saddles, Etc., West Side 

Public Square. 
The fine harness and saddlery emporium of 
Mr. J. E. Merrill, located on the west side of 
the Public Square, was established in February, 
1S79, at its present location, and from its verv 
inception has met with a most giatitying and 
encouraging degree of success. The general 
sales and stock rooms are 22x50 feet in dimen- 
sions, and the manulacturing department 
occupies a space of 20x22 feet, »hcre an aver- 
age force of rive skilled and experienced work- 
men is employed in the manufacture of fine 
single and double harness of the best hand- 
made varieties. The stock carried in the sales 
department embraces a fine line of harness, 
saddles, collars, bridles, summer and winter 
hor>e clothing and equipments, ?table supplies, 
turf goods, Columbus toe weight, etc. From 
a comparatively moderate commencement, 
Mr. Merrill has, by enterprise, ability and strict 
attention to business, established a trade which 



CITY OF RUSnVILLE. 



63 



■will aggregate fully $12,000 per annum, and 
compare I'avorably' with that of any contem- 
poraneous hoii<ie in this section of the state. 
Mr. Merrill is a native of Franklin County, 
and was horn in 1S56. He was engaged in a 
variety of business pursuits and avocations 
prior to embarking in his present successful 
enterprise, and is well and favorably known 
throughout this and adjoining counties. 

\V. S. OR WIN, 

Jewf.lf.h, No. 14 Rlth St. 
The favorite jewelry house of Mr. W. S. 
Orwin, at No. 14 Ruth St. was established by 
its present popular proprietor in 1S79, since 
which time a steady and gratil'ying increase of 
trade has rewarded his energetic efforts and 
application to business. His sales room at the 
above named location is 14x56 feet in dimen- 
sions and is fitted up in a neat and attractive 
manner for the display of iiis admirably select- 
ed stock of American and imported watches 
fine clocks, gold and plated jewelry, solid silver 
and plated table ware, etc. Mr. Orwin makes 
a prominent specialty of repairing watclies, 
clocks and jewelry and devotes his personal 
attention to cleaning, repairing and adjusting 
fine watches and time keepers of every des- 
cription. He employs one assistant and each 
succeeding year has witnessed a considerable 
increase in his annual transactions which will 
compare favorably with those of any contem- 
poraneous establishment in the city. Mr. 
Orwin is a native of Washington County, Pa. 
where he was born in 1846 and has been a res- 
ident of Indiana since he was five years of age. 
He is a practical and experienced watch 
maker and jeweler, thoroughly lamiliar with 
all branches of the business and with the dedi- 
cate iTiechanisni of all the various styles of 
watches now in use, whether of American or 
European make. 

J. T. BARNES, 

Dealer in Fine Carri.\ges. Blggies, 
Blxkboards a.nd Ro.m) Carts. 
The Barnes patent road cart, although intro- 
duced to the public as recently as 1SS2, has 
received the most flattering testimonials of 
approbation from all classes, its sales now 
extending into many of the principal slates of 
the Union. These popul.ar vehicles are con- 
structed upon scientific principles, embodying 
advantages which cannot tiil to be appreciated 
by those familiar with the ordinary styles of 
carts now in use. By the application of 
peculiarlv formed springs, and special devices 
invented and patented by Mr. Barnes, that 
peculiar jolting motion occasioned by and par- 
taking of the movements of the horse is entire- 
ly obviated, giving ease in riding, mounting 
and dismounting. Added to the special 
advantages obtained by lioth front and rear 
springs, these carts are constructed through- 
out otthebe>t material, finished in the highest 
style of mechanical art, and combine the high- 
est maximum of strength with the lowest 
mmimum of weight. These carts, which are 



protected by letters patent from the United 
States Government, issued September 26th, 
iSSi, are manufactured only by J. T. Barnes, 
of Rushville, whose office and salesrooms are 
located on Noble St., near the southwest cor- 
ner of the public square. This liouse was 
established in August, 18S2, and has built up a 
large and steadily increasing trade. Jvlr. 
Barnes is exclusive agent for the Columbus 
Buggy Co., Columbus, Ohio, and carries in 
stock, in .addition to his own products, a fine 
stock of Columbus wagons, open and top bug- 
gies, etc., which he is enabled bv special 
arrangement to offer at factory price's, ftlr. J. 
T. Barnes, the inventor and patentee of this 
special style of road cart, is a nativeof this state 
and county, and was born in 1S43. He was 
chiefly engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
1872, when he conducted a liverv and sale 
stable for about four years, at the expiration of 
which time he returned to the farm where he 
remained until embarking in his present line 
of business as above noted. 



GRAND HOTEL, 

S. Stockdki.l, Prop'r., S. W. Corner 

PtnLic .Square. 
Strangers visiting Rushville whoare fortun- 
ate enough to register at the Grand Hotel, 
cannot tail to form a favorable opinion of our 
prosperous and pleasant metropolis, under the 
hospitaiile roof of this popular hostelry, so 
ably and elficientlv conducted bv the accom- 
plished proprietor, Mr. S. Stockdell, a gentle- 
man of extended experience in catering to the 
wants of the traveling public. Tiie present 
"Grand" was for many vears known as the 
Hamilton, and subsequently as the Lakeii 
House, receiving its present appropriate title 
in 1879. It came into the posse^sicm of Mr. 
Stickdell in June, iSSi. at which time he suc- 
ceeded Messrs. Evans A: Riggs. The main 
building is a substantial and conveniently 
arranged four story structure 50x100 feet in 
dimensions, with a commodious "L,." During 
the past few years the house has from time to 
time undergone numerous important improve- 
ments, alterations and additions, and is now 
first-class in all its arrangements and appoint- 
ments. On the first floor is the office, reading 
room and writing room, barber shop, fine 
sample rooms lor commercial travelers, dining 
room, culinary and laundry departments, etc. 
On the second floor are the ladies' parlors and 
reception rooms and apartments for guests, 
single and en suite- The entire third floor is 
devoted to sleeping rooms, guest chambers, 
etc. The rooms are neatly and comfortably 
furnished, well kept and supplied with gas and 
all the mcxiern conveniences. 7"he cuisine is 
presided o\'er by experienced and competent 
cooks and caterers, and the table bountifully 
supplied with all the substantials, luxuries and 
dainties of the season, served in the most 
attractive and appetizing manner. Mr. Stock- 
dell is a native of Kentucky, but came to this 
state with his parents when but two years of 
age. He was for about twenty years engaged - 



64 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



In commercial pursuits at Seymour in this 
slate, after wliicfi he assuined the inanasjement 
of the Western Motel at Columbus, Indiana, 
■where he remained for four years prior to as- 
suming control ot the Grand, wiiicti has, under 
his liberal and ctlicient administration, become 
deservedly popular with the traveling public. 

DR. I. N. HARRIS, 
Dkntal Sukgeom. 
While there are lew equally skilled in the 
practice of applied dentistry in this section, 
there are none who occupy a higher protes- 
sional, scientific or social position than the 
subject of the present sketch. Dr. 1. N. Harris, 
whose residence, oflice and laboratory are 
located on Perkins St, near the north-east 
corner of the public square. Dr. Harris is a 
native of Allegheny County, where he was 
born in 1S34. He came west in 184S, and in 
the same vear commenced the study of opera- 
tive and "mechanical dentistry at Madison, 
Indiana, In the oll'ice of N. B. Slayton, an emi- 
nent dental surgeon of that city. After com- 
pleting his course of instruction and studies, 
he traveled extensively in various sections of 
the West and located permanently in Rush- 
ville in 1852; where for more than a quarter of 
a century, he has enjoyed a lucrative and suc- 
cessful practice. He is a prominent membe;r 
of the Slate Dental Association of Indiana, 
and is thoroughly conversant with all the 
latest methods and improvements which mod- 
ern science has introduced in the practice of 
both operative and mechanical dental surgery. 
Dr. Harris makes a jirominent specialty of the 
preservation of natural teeth — never recom- 
mending extraction while there is a reasonable 
chance of saving the teeth of his patrons. He 
however pays particular attention to extract- 
ing teeth in the most careful manner, when 
deemed advisable, and administers harmless 
anaesthetics when so desired. His laboratory 
is filled up with the latest improved and most 
expensive devices for the manufacture of arti- 
ficial sets, upon metallic, rubber or celluloid 
plates, and he guarantees the most perfect sat- 
isfaction at reasonable prices. Dr. Harris 
enjoys a practice extending throughout a wide 
area'of adjacent territory, iiis well earned repu- 
tation for skill and thorough reliability ensur- 
ing for him the confidence and patronage of 
the better class of citizens in Rush and neigh- 
boring counties. 

B. F. REA, 

Restaurant.\nd Dining Rooms, West 

Side Public Square. 
A neatly arranged, well appointed restaur- 
ant is to be found in Rushville on the west 
side of the public square, directly opposite the 
court house, conducted by Mr. B. F. Rea, suc- 
cessor to Stephens A Brooks, who opened 
these popular rooms in January, 1884, in con- 
nection with Mr. Stephens, whom lie after- 
wards bouglit out. Everything is new, neat 
and clean, and special care is taken to furnish 
to patrons the choicest viands which the mar- 



ket affords, served in the best and most attrac- 
tive styles at reasonable rates. Meals and 
lunches are served at all hours, and a specialty 
is made of clioice oysters and ice cream in their 
appropriate seasons. The front portion of this 
establishment is fitted up in modern metro- 
politan style, with fine show cases, etc., for the 
display of an admirably selected assortment of 
French and American confectionery, foreign 
and domestic fruits, nuts, etc. The dining 
room is furnished in tlie best style, and occu- 
pies the remainder of the room, which is 2oxSo 
feet in dimensions, while the culinary depart- 
ment is located at the rear. Mr. Rea is a native 
of Favette County, and was born in 1S46; he 
came to this city in 18S4, previous to which 
time lie was for over six years agent lor the J. 
M. iV I. R. R.. at Falmouth, Indiana;and dur- 
ing a portion of this time, express agent at the 
same point, where he was also quite exten- 
sively engaged in buying and shipping grain, 
stock, etc. 



JAMES GERAGHTV, 

Groceries, No. 7 Noiile St. 
Mr. James Geraghty, proprietor of the 
popular family grocery house, No. 7 Noble 
St., is a native of Ireland and was born in 
County Mayo in 1839. He came to the United 
.Stales in 1864, landing at New York. He first 
settled at Ashland, .Schuylkill County, Peiin'a., 
where he was engaged in coal mining lor a 
time, becoming a resident of this city m 1865. 
Here he was employedin a variety of pursuits, 
and among others worked for Mr. Geo. C. 
Clark for about six and a half years. He sub- 
sequently was engaged as a contractor on 
street construction, etc., and by industry, 
economy and energy amassed a h.indsoine 
competency, and in 1881 embarked in his pres- 
ent successful mercantile pursuit in a sub- 
stantial brick building 20x40 feet in dimen- 
sions, with basement, which he erected 
expressly for the purposes for which it is now 
employed. He is at the present time erecting 
anotlier building of the same dimensions on 
the east side o( his present establishment, 
which will lie occupied by him for the accom- 
modation of his steadily increasing trade. Mr. 
Geraghty carries in stock an admirably 
selected assortment of the choicest varieties of 
staple and fancy family groceries, teas, cotVees, 
spices, canned goods, fruits, vegetables, pro- 
duce, provisions, cigars, tobacco, wines, liq- 
uors, ale, beer, etc., and has, since the incep- 
tion of his present business, built up a large 
and established trade in both city and country. 
Mr Geraghtv enioys the fullest confidence of 
all with whom he has had business trans.ac- 
tions, and ■ his unswerving integrity has 
ensured for him a wide and influential circle 
of acquaintances. He was appointed guardian 
ot the estate of the late Michael Toolen, a most 
responsible position, involving the inanage- 
ment and control of a large amount of valua- 
ble real estate and other property, and has ful- 
filled the obligations of this important trust 
with marked ability and fidelity. 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



65 



THE RUSHVILLE CASH STORE, 
Caldwell & Jonrs, Ruth Street. 
As one of the leading dry goods houses of 
Eastern Indiana, that now conducted under 
the firm name and stvle of Caldwell i: Jones 
and familiarly kno«nas the " Rushville Cash 
Store" claims conspicuous consideration in the 
present historical review, both on account of 
the extent and variety of its stock and the 
magnitude of its transactions which will at 
the present time considerably exceed $25,000 
per annum. This representative house was 
founded in 1S73 ^y ^Jessrs. Mauzy, Caldwell 
& Magee, which firm was succeeded by Cald- 
well iV Ayers and they in turn by the present 
proprietors in January, 1SS4. The premises 
occupied for the display of Iheir extensive and 
admirably selected slock are centrallv located 
on Ruth St. opposite the court house, where 
two entire fioors, each 24x100 feet in dimen- 
sions are required for sales and storage pur- 
poses. The stock which is at all limes full 
and complete and especially adapted to the re- 
quirements of the trade in this section, embraces 
a general line of imported and American dry 
goods, elegant and fashionable dress fabrics, 
woolens, white goods, domestics, corsets' hos- 
iery, gloves, ladies' and gentlemens' furnish- 
ing goods and underwear, small wares, notions, 
hats, caps, boots, shoes, etc. Mr. Wm. A. 
Caldwell, a native and lite-long resident of 
Rush County, was born in 1S44 and has been 
for many years prominently identified with 
the commercial interests and dry goods trade 
of this city. Mr. John A. Jones, a native of 
Kentucky, was born in 1847 but has resided in 
this state for several years and been engaged 
in mercantile pursuits prior to the formation 
of the present partnership. They are both 
young men of more than ordinary business 
ability and enterprise, and with facilities of the 
highest order, ample capacity and a brilliant 
and untarnished career this representative 
house has acquired a place in the consideration 
of this community to which few firms attain 
and perhaps fewer still deserve. In the ad- 
vantages oU'ered to our citizens, both in quality 
and prices, they are able to successfully com- 
pete with any contemporaneous house in East- 
ern Indiana. 



CITY BAKERY & RESTAURANT, 

H1LLIG0S.S & Son; West Side Public 
Square. 
This establishment was opened nearly seven 
years ago by Mr. J. D. Glore, who was suc- 
ceeded by tiie firm of Hilligoss & Kelly, and 
in February, 1SS4, Mr. Kelly retired and the 
firm name and style became Hilligoss & Son. 
The premises occupied are 22xSo feet in 
dimensions. In the sales department will be 
found French and American confectionery, 
foreign and American fruit;, nuts, canned and 
bottled goods, cigars, tobacco, etc. In the res- 
taurant are nicely furnished tables and lunch 
counters, with a seating capacity for nearly 
fifty guests at one time; and the bill of fare 
embraces the choicest substanlials and luxu- 



ries the market affords. In the manufacturing 
department, or bakery, special attention is paid 
to the manufacture of choice family bread, 
rolls, cakes, pies, etc., \%'hich are sold over the 
counter, served at the table, or supplied to cus- 
tomers in the city or county. Tliis firm also 
enjoys unrivalled facilities for supplying wed- 
dings, parties, festivals, picnics, etc., witli fancy 
cakes, ice-creams and refreshments of every 
description at reasonable rates. Mr. Ambrose 
Hilligoss, the senior member of the firm is a 
native of this county, and was born in 1S30. 
He has been prominently identified with the 
agricultural interests of this section, and in 
addition to his connection with the present 
firm, owns and carries on a fine farm about 
three miles from the city limits. His son, Mr. 
Omar Hilligoss, the general manager of the 
business, is also a native and lifelong resident 
of this county, and previous to the formation 
of the present partnership, was principally 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

J. K. JAMISON, 

SuRGKON Dentist. 
The uondert'ul advances which have been 
made during the past quarter of a century in 
the various departments of operative and me- 
chanical dental surgery have been fully com- 
mensurate with the developments in other 
branches of the professional and mechanical 
arts which have characteri7ed this progressive 
age. From the rude instruments in use a 
generation ago, when dentistry was regarded 
as a necessary but unimportant branch of the 
physician's profession, to the perfected and 
elegant appliances in use at the present day, 
has been indeed a wonderful step in scientific 
evolution. Keeping fully informed upon all 
the discoveries and innovations of the age, and 
availing himself of all the improvements in tfie 
mechanical department of the profession, Ur. 
J. K. Jameson of Rushvillc ofiers his services 
to the citizens of this and adjoining counties, 
confident of his ability to give perfect satisfac- 
tion in either department of dental surgery. 
His parlors and operating rooms are located 
in Carr A: Ringle's block, and are fitted up in 
a neat and appropriate manner with all the 
modern improvements and appliances; and 
special attention is paid to the extraction of 
teeth, filling with gold or other metals, and to 
the manufacture of full or partial sets from the 
best materials known to the profession. Dr. 
Jameson is a native of Lancaster County, 
Penn'a., and after completing his literary edu- 
cation, engaged in the study of dental surgery, 
and commenced the practice of his profession 
at Mt. Carmel, Indiana, in 1S54. In iS'>o he 
removed his oiTice to Shelbyville in this state, 
wfiere he remained for twelve vears, at the 
expiration of which time he located at Con- 
nersville, where he remained until 1SS2, when 
he remoyed to Indianapolis, becoming a mem- 
ber of the firm of Jameson tV Rawls. In 1684 
he established his present office in this city, 
where he has met with a gratifying degree of 
encouragement and success. He is an accom- 



66 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



plishcd and thoroughlv educated dental sur- 
geon, and a £;radua'.e ot' the Ohio Dental 
College. 

JOHN A. SPURRIER, 

Jkwelky, Pianos, ()rg.\ns, &c. 

The highest development of modern civili- 
zation, culture and reriniment tinds adequate 
expression in its admiration lor, and apprecia- 
tion ot eleg.'int articles ot' ieweirv tor ur.e and 
per.sonal atiornment, and in the "concord ot* 
sweet sound-'," as produced by the various 
styles of piano*, organs and musical instru- 
ments in use at the present day. The combi 
nation in a commercial point of view of ievv- 
elry and musical merchandise is therelbre 
eminently appropriate and as conducted by 
Mr. John A. Spurrier, the enterprising " Main 
Street Jeweler " constitvites one of tiic most 
interesting, as well as important of our local 
mercantile interests. Mr. .Spurrier, who iias 
been in active business in this cit\' for tiie past 
ten years, opened his present establishment on 
Main St., opposite the post ollice in iSS,^ 
and has already met with a most encour.aging 
degree of success. Ills sales room, which is 
20.\50 feet in dimensions is fitted up in a most 
attractive style for the display of his adndrably 
selected assortment of imported and American 
gold and silver watches, clocks, fine jewelry, 
etc.; pianos, organs, small musical merchan- 
dise, sheet music, instruction books, etc. Mr. 
Spurrier handles, as exclusive agent in this 
city, the well known and popular Decker Sons 
and the Emer-on Pianos and the Burdette, 
Sterling and Chicago cottage organs, w hich 
by special arrangements witlv the manulactu- 
rers he is enabled to otler at factory prices. 
His stock in both departments is elegant, select 
and comprehensive and his transactions for 
the first year exceeded S 16,000, with a large 
and steadily increasing local trade which is 
now extending rapidly to remote sections of 
this and adjoining counties. .Mr. .Spurrier is 
a native of this state and was born in 1S47. 
He was lormerly engaged exclusively in the 
sale of pianos and organs as manufacturer's 
agent, and since the inauguration of his pres- 
ent enterprise has found the acquaintances 
then formed of great benefit in his present busi- 
ness venture. 

\VM T. JONES, 

Restalran r, No. 9 Rlth .St. 
The new restaurant, dining and lunch rooms 
of Mr. W. T. Jones, in the Cox building on 
Ruth St., were opened to the public on the 
22d of March, [SS4. The dining and lunch 
rooms, which are JOX70 feet in c|imensions, are 
fitted up in an elegant and attractive style, 
with numerous tables for the accommodation 
of guests and private parties, having an aggre- 
gate seating capacity tor about fit'tv persons. 
The cursinf and commissary department is 
under the immediate supervision of Mr. Jones, 
who is an experienced caterer, and who pro- 
vides for the accommodation of his patrons the 
choicest viands the market aflbrds, in seasona- 



ble substantials and delicacies, which are 
served by polite and courteous attendants in 
the most attractive and appetizing forms. 
Regular meals or lunches are furnished at all 
hours a la curtc\ or to day-boarders by the day 
or week at greatly reduced rates. Mr. Jones is 
also prepared at all times to furnish refresh- 
ments or suppers for balls, festivals, public or 
private parties, banquets, collations, etc., in the 
most approved style and at moderate rates. 
Mr. Jones is a native of this county, and was 
born in 1S44. In Ii363, althougfi but nineteen 
years of age, he entered the service of his 
country, and enlisted as a private in the 123d 
Regiment Indiana \'olunteers. This com- 
mand was assigned to the Army of the Cum- 
berland, and with it Mr. Jones participated in 
many of the important caiTipaigns ant! engage- 
ments ot that eventlul period of our country's 
history, including the battles around Nashville, 
and the memorable battles, bivouacs and skir- 
mishes of the Georgia campaign. He received 
an honorable discharge at the expiration of the 
war in September, itki;, and since his return 
to civil lite, has been engaged in vaiious pur- 
suits prior to embarking in his present suc- 
cessf"ul enterprise. 



BLISS ^: WILSON, 

ClOTHI.VG, FlRNISlIING GoODS, EtC, 

Opi>o.site Court House. 
This model clothing and furnishing empori- 
um, fronting on the public square, known as 
the "square-dealing clothiers," occupies a room 
20xSo feet in dimensions on Main St., with an 
L fronting on Ruth St. iS feet, where is 
carried one of the largest and most complete 
stocks of merchandite in this line to be lound 
in Eiistern Indiana, comprising fashionable, 
seasonable and well-made suits and garments 
for men's and boy's wear, selected with an ex- 
press view to the requirements of the trade in 
this section, gentlemen's furnishing goods and 
underwear, hats and caps, trunks, vaiises, trav- 
eling bags, etc. These goods are of the best 
and most serviceable fabrics and styles, pur- 
chased in large lots direct from manulacturers, 
and are oliered at such prices as to del'y suc- 
cesst'ul competition by any contemporaneous 
establishment in this section ot the stale. 
Their trade is derived from Rush and adjoin- 
ing counties, and their annual transactions 
aggregate from $35,000 to $40,000, and are 
steadily increasing with each succeeding sea- 
sou. The individual members of this popular 
and enterprising firm are George W. Bliss and 
Frank M. Wilson. The former is a native of 
Lewis County, Kentucky, and was born in 
1S50. He is thoroughly conversant with all 
branches of the business, having been engaged 
in the clothing trade since he was sixteen 
years of age, and is now connected with a 
wholesale clothing house at Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mr. Wilson is a native and life-long resident 
of Rush County, and was born in iSsS. He 
has been chieily engaged in this special dejiart- 
ment of trade since 1S76. This lirm not only 
possesses the highest qualifications but the 



CITY OF RUSHVILLE. 



67 



fullest advantages for securing to patrons the 
most favorable rates, and guar;inteejtheirgoods 
as represented. 

JOHN KENNARD, 

MANUf AETURING JeWELER, RUTH St. 

Thoroughly and practicallj conversant 
wi'h all branches of this interesting and im- 
portant art, Mr. John Kennard, of Ruth St., 
offers his services to liie retidents of Rusli and 
adjoining counties tor the manufacture of en- 
gagement and wedding rings, society pins and 
badges, and every description of fine jevvelrv 
to order. He carries in stock a fine line of 
watches, clocks, gold and plated jewelry, silver 
ware, etc., espociallv adapted to the require- 
ments of the trade in this section, together 
with the finest assortment of Amethysts, Cam- 
eos, Garnets, Onyx and precious stones to be 
found in this part of the State whicli he is pre- 
pared to mount in any desired form, at the 
shortest notice. He makes a prominent spec- 
ialty of le-mounting diamonds in modern 
styles of setting, altering rings to any size, 
cleaning, repairing and adjusting fine watches 
and clocks, and general jewelry repairing. He 
pays the highest price for old gold and silver, 
or will **niake over" old jewelry if desired. 
Mr. Kennard is a native of New York City, 
where lie was born in 1S40. He has been a 
resident of this State lor the past five years, 
embarking in business on his own account in 
this city in iSSo, where by his skill, industry 
and ability he has established a prosperous and 
growing trade. He has been associated with 
the business in which he is engaged since 
boyhood and is a thoroughly practical and ex- 
pert master of the prol'ession. 

L. S. HARRIS, 

Dry Gooiis, Notions, Etc. 
In making the assertion that the dry goods 
trade is the leading branch of commerce which 
engages the attention and employs the capital 
of the representative merchants of the United 
States we but repeat a statement which is sus- 
ceptible of demonstration by reliable statistics. 
It is therefore eminently fitting and appropri- 
ate in reviewing tlie industrial and com- 
mercial interests of the thriving city of Rush- 
ville that due recogrition should be accorded 
to the popular dry goods emporium of Mr. L. 
S. Harris, on Ruth St., which, although estab- 
lished as recently as in 1&S3 has already be- 
come deservedly popular with the citizens of 
this and adjacent counties as one of the most 
prosperous and complete establisliments of its 
class in Eastern Indiana. From its very in- 
ception the career of tliis representative estab- 
lishment has been onward and upward, its 
transactions for the first year reaching more 
than $J5,ooo;and each succeeding month has 
witnessed a most gratifying increase in the ag- 
gregate of its sales over the preceding month. 
Determined to " lead ratlier than compete," Mr. 
Harris omits no opportunity to secure rare 
bargains and all the i.itest novelties in foreign 
and American dry goods, rich and elegant 



dress fabrics, domestics, woolens, white goods> 
laces, trimmings^ embroideries, corsets, gloves 
and hosiery, ladies', gentlemcns' andchildrens' 
furnisiiing goods anel underwear, notions, fancy 
goods and miscllaneous merchandise in this 
line, which he purchases in large lots direct 
from importers, jobbers and first hands. His 
assortment of remnants in fine imported laces, 
trimmings and embroideries is a curious sight 
well worthy the critical examination of the 
ladies who are usually experts in such matters 
and the rare tiargains oll'ered therein cannot 
fail to excite the admiration of all. Five com- 
petent and courteous assistants are employed 
in the sales department who regard it as tiO 
trouble to show goods whether visitors desire 
to purchase or not. Mr. Harris, who is a na- 
tive of Kentucky, was born in I'l.i-l, but has 
been a resident of this state for the past six 
years. He is practically conversant with all 
branches of the drv goods trade, and although 
yet a young man, possesses in an eminent de- 
gree these essential ciualilications which can- 
not fail to insure for him a brilliant and suc- 
cessful career in commercial lite. 



CITY BOOT AND SHOE SHOP, 
J. \V. Wilson, No. 17 Rum St. 
The leading specialty for which the well 
known City Boot and Shoe Shop of Mr. J. 
W. Wilson, on Ruth St., first door east of the 
Windsor Hotel, has acquired a more tlian local 
celebrity, is tlic manulacture of fine custom 
work for ladies' and gentlemens' wear, and in 
this special line it is the recognized headquar- 
ters for reliable, perfect fitting, and finely 
fit ished work in Eastern Indiana. The front 
portion of this establishment is occupied as 
salesroom, where may be found at all times a 
fine assortment of custom-made boots and 
shoes of his own manufacture, leather and 
findings, which he is enabled to fu-mish to tlie 
trade at citv prices, while the n ar jiortion is 
occupied bv the manulacturing and repair de- 
partment, to wliich special attention is given. 
Mr. Wilson first commenced business on his 
own account in this city in 1S7;, on Main St., 
where he remained for two years. In 1S74 he 
went west, locating in tlie Arkansas Valley, 
where, for about four years, he was engaged 
in butchering for the "United .States Govern- 
ment, and in agricultural pursuits, fie 
returned to this city in iSSi and shortly after- 
wards embarked in business at his present 
location. Mr Wilson, who is a native of But- 
ler County, Ohio, was born in 1S41. In 1S62 
he enlisted in the United States service as a 
member of the 7Sth Regiment, Indiana Vol- 
unteers. Shortly at'ter entering the field the 
entire regiment was captured by theConteder- 
ate forces in Kentucky, and subsequently 
paroled. They were not afterwards called into 
active service. He learned the trade of bfx>t 
and shoe maker before entering the service, 
in 1S57-S, with Mr. John F, Castle, and is a 
thoroughly practical and experienced work- 
man. 



68 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



EVERETT i: FERCtUSON, 
Barisers, Main St. 
Transacting the large-^t business of any 
similar establishment in the city-, tlio popular 
tonsorial parlors of Messrs. Everett A: Fergu- 
son claim special recognition as among tlie 
representative industries of Rushville. Tliis 
shop was opened in iSSi liy Mr. ICdward Ev- 
erett, who conducted the business alone for 
about one year, when Mr. David Ferguson, 
■who had fi>r thirteen months previously car 
ried on the same business at another location, 
became associated with him, and the two 
establishments were consolidatrd. The |)rem- 
ises occupied are 12x40 feet in dimensions, and 
si.'C chairs, presided over by competent and 
skilled hair cutters and manipulators of the 
razor, are in constant requisition. The ap- 
pointments of these rooms are tirst-class in 
every particular, and the constant aim of the 
proprietors and their accomplished assistants 
is to please their patrons and insure first-class 
■work. Mr. Everett is a native of Ohio, and 
learned his trade at Laurcnceburg, this state, 
becoming a resident of Rushville in 1S74. 
Mr. Ferguson, a native of this state, learned 
his tr.idc at Cambridge city, and has resided 
here for the past twelve years. They are both 



thoroughly and practically conversant with all 
branches of the business, and were emploved 
by other parties prior to embarking in business 
on their own account. 



In addition to the firms already mentioned, 
are the following; Buel i: Reed, grain ; E. H. 
Wolt", real estate; Norris & Uro., agricultural 
implements; Allen A: Co., grocers: W. J. 
Waite, drug.s; J. Carmichael, flour mills 
Fonts & Motletl, lumber; C Spring Cart Co. 
carriages; Patton & Caldwell, tile; J R. Pun 
tenney, grocer; P. Fitzgerald, tailor; Barnard 
>.S: P'lenner, jewelry ; J. \V. Kirkpatrick, grocer 
E. D. Beher, drugs; J. R. Carmichael, dry 
goods; W. N. Stewart, furniture; C. S. Geyef, 
grocer; J. E. Kennedy, hardware; E.' B, 
Pcundstone, carriages; Priest Si Fletcher, 
horses; Kahn 1.^: Co , clothing; B. W. Rilev 
grocer; J. W. Carnine, baker; Z. E. MauzV 
boots and shoes; Wilson & Stockham, agri 
cultural implements; M. E. Davis, dry goods 
II. C. Bakemeyer, grocer; W. B. Foe, jewelry 
H. Schenkel, boots and shoes; Roosa A: Rat 
lirt", drugs; J. Bloomer, tailor; C. H. Doelker, 
meats; J. M. Muire, dentist; J. Scanlan, 1 
cer; G. Wingerter, cigars; T. A. McCoy, 
meats. 




CARTHAGE. 



This enterprising village tlioxigh not 
possessing any special advantages in the 
way of railroad facilities, has for many 
years held the second position in com- 
mercial importance and p<ipulation among 
the towns of Rush County, being the 
largest and most flourishing town outside 
the county scat. 

It was laid out in 1S35 by Mr. John 
Clark and the first house in the place was 
built by ]Mr. Robert Hill and his son 
Bryan, during the same year. A trading 
place was established here before the 
town was laid out and as early as 1840 
Mr. Benjamin Hill had started a store 
consisting of general merchandise. Sub- 
sequently Eli Stratton opened a store 
here. The first wagon shop was started 
by George W. Pierce and the first black- 
smith shop by Isaac Nelson. The first 
church built here was the Friends and 
the next was the M. E. Church. The 
first post master was Mr. Henry Henley 
who still resides here. The first grist mill 
was built as early as 1826 and was situa- 
ted about 100 feet above the location of 
the present finely equipped flouring mill. 
The first newspaper was started here in 
1880, called the Carthage Clarion and 
continued for two j'ears. Since then 
several other papers have been started at 
different times. Among the early set- 
tlers in this sction we mention Jesse and 
Robert Hill, Benj. Hill, Thomas Henley, 
Abrm. Small, Dayton Holloway, Charles 
Henley, M. Binford and J. Phelps. 

Carthage at the present time contains 
a population of about 600 inhabitants of 



an intelligent and })ri)sperous class. In 
point of wealth it will bear favorable 
comparison with any place of its size in 
the state. It is surrounded by a rich ag- 
ricultural district .settled by an economi- 
cal and thrifty class of agriculturists and 
stock raisers. This whole section is well 
watered, affording fine water power, while 
one of the finest flouring mills in the state 
is located here, with several others in this 
part of the county. The town contains a 
large public school building, with a gra- 
ded school having an average atteiidance 
of 214 pupils; two churches. Friends and 
M. E., and a substantial banking house. 
The town was incorporated in 1858 and 
is situated in the north-west portion of 
Rush County, five miles south of Knights- 
town on the north and seven miles from 
Arlington on the south. About 1848 the 
old flat bar railroad was built as far as 
this j)lace but after about two years was 
abandoned. The old road bed still re- 
mains in most places and offers quite an 
inducement toward the erection of a new 
road which will ere long be taken advan- 
tage of by some company. 

Closing this rapid and general review 
of the industries of Carthage we espe- 
cially direct the attention of the reader 
to the series of articles that follow, as 
containing more detailed and valuable 
information than can be readily obtained 
from any other source. The articles are 
based upon facts collected with much 
trouble by the publishers and the reader 
may safely rely upon the statements made 
as being within the bounds of truth. 



70 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



GWYNNE, JOHNSON & CO, 
Dry Goods, Clothing, etc. 
The house of Messrs Gwvnne, Johnson & 
Co., of Carthiige was established on a compar- 
atively small scale, as early as in 1S50, at 
which time Mr. Gwynne associatecJ himself 
with Mr. Wm. Johnson, who was a prominent 
member of the Society of FriencN of this place, 
and who had previously been engaijed in mer- 
cantile pursuits in this place. Mr. Johnson 
enjoyed a wide circle of acquaintances by 
whom he was and still is held in the highest 
esteem, and this hoi:se takes pleasure in ac- 
klowlcdging that lohim was largely due those 
influences whicli secured its success and pros- 
perity. The partnership continued in force, 
until Mr. Johnson, owing to ill he.i'.th deemed 
it advisable to retire, whicli he did \utU quite a 
competency, hut still resides in this village 
one of our most liighlv honored and respected 
citizens. This extensive establisliment now 
occupies as general salesroom one entire floor 
20x90 feet ill dimensions, a room devoted to 
the clothing department Jox.:^, a stock room 
of the same dimen-ions, and an otlice 15x20, 
carrying one of the most extensive, complete 
and com|>reliensive stocks of merchandise of 
any conlemporanenus house in Eastern Indi- 
ana, embracing a complete line of Foreign and 
American dry goods, woolens, domestics,! inens, 
white goods, dress fabrics, trimmings, laces, 
embroideries, house furnishing supplies, men.s, 
bov's and chiltlren's read\' made clothing from 
the leading manufactories of the union, ladle's 
and gentlemen's furnishing goods, boots, shoes, 
hats, caps, qucensware, glassware, notions, 
heavy and shell hardware, cutlery, farmer's 
and mechanic's tools and implements etc. 
Their annual sales will fully aggregate 
more thim 25,000 per annum. Mr. O'Urien 
Gwynne, the senior member of this firm, is a 
native of the north of Ireland, where he was 
born in iS:o. He was extensively engaged in 
the linen manufactory in Strabane in connec- 
tion with his brother, Wm. Gwynne, giving 
employment to over 2,000 hands at one time 
prior to coming to America in 1S47, during 
which year he landed at New York City, and 
located at Sheibyville in this state, where he 
secured a position as book keeper for Mr. 
Samuel Hamilton, which he retained for about 
three years. He became a resident of Carth- 
age in May 1S50, at which time, in company 
with Mr. Wm. Johnson, he est.iblished the 
business which has since grown to such mag- 
nificent proportions. He started with limited 
capital financially, but with an earnest deter- 
mination to achieve success by strict attention 
to his business and a uniform system of fair 
and honorable dealing, which has been rigidly 
adhered to. He has by native industry, per- 
severance and ability amassed a competency, 
and in addition to his cctensive business inter- 
ests he owns considerable real estate and other 
property in various sections of the county. 
He has held the responsible position of town- 
ship trustee for fourteen consecutive years, and 
has been prominently identified with the 



growth and advancement of our local interests 
tor more than a third of a century. Mr. A. 
W. Newsone, his partner and business associ- 
ate is a native and life long resident of Rush 
County, and was born in 1S42. His earlv lite 
was spent in agricultural pursuits, and in"iS66 
he commenced iiis mercantile career as a clerk 
in the house of which he is now a partner, 
anti in this capacity was associated with Mr. 
Gwynne for about fourteen years, being ad- 
mitted to an interest in the business in 1^79. 



WM. S. JOHNSON, 
FuNiiR,\L Director. 
The position of funeral director and under- 
taker is one requiring for its successful prose- 
cution a thorough comprehension of the 
proprieties governing the management of the 
last sad rites which the living are permitted to 
p.ay to the loved and lost, 'ere tliev are con- 
signed to the silent toinh, and for this reason 
it is one of the most important of human avo- 
cations, and as such, entitled to more than a 
passing mention in a historical «ork of this 
description. Possessing in an eminent degree, 
all the requisites and qualifications, with facili- 
ties unsurpas.sed lor embalming the dead, and 
attending to all the details connected with their 
interment, in a tilting and becoming manner, 
Mr. William .S. Johnson ol Carthage tenders 
his .services to the risidents of this and adjoin- 
ing towns, as a director of I'uneral obsequies 
and general undertaker. Mr. Johnson com- 
menced business in this place as long ago as in 
1S55, in partnershi]) with h s lather in the I'ur- 
niture line, and ten years later introduced 
undertaking as a feature of their business. 
Subsequently he sold out the furniture depart- 
ment to his brothers, who still continue the 
business; and since that time he has devoted 
his exclusive attention to undertaking and 
embalming. He carries in stock a large line 
ot fine and common caskets, coffins, burial 
cases, shrouds and general undertakers' sup- 
plies; and is proprietor of a fine hearse for the 
use of funerals in town or county, and will 
supply carriages when so desired, and under- 
take the entire management, with special ref- 
erence to the wishes of triends of the deceased, 
or in accordance with tlie lornis and rituals of 
secret and benevolent organizations. He has 
had a pr.actical experience of more than six 
years as an cmbalmer, by the most approved 
scientific processes, without the aid of ice. ex- 
cept in those cases where decomposition has 
commenced. Mr. Johnson is a native of Dub- 
lin, Wayne County, Indiana, where he was 
born in i!S.";5. His father removed to Carthage 
when he was but three years of age, and he 
has since been a resident of this phice. Dur- 
ing the war of the rebellion he enlisted in the 
three months service as a member of Co. K, 
134th Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
which was principally engaged in post and 
garrison duty at Louisville, Green River, De- 
catur, Alabama, ana other points until the 
expiration of its term of service, when he re- 
ceived an honorable discharge 



CARTHAGE. 



71 



CARTHAGE MILLS, 

Samuel Emmons, Proprietor. 
One of the most thoroughly equipped flour- 
ing mills in the state, producing the finest 
grades of family flour in the market, are those 
known as the Carthage Mills owned by Mr. 
Samuel Emmons, and under the direct man- 
agement of Mr. X. A. Emmons, his son, who 
succeeded Messrs. Henley Bros., in the man- 
agement in 1SS3. These model mills origin- 
ally erected in 1S79 and iSSo by Mr. Henry 
Henley, are located on the banks of the Blue 
River, from which stream abundant water 
power is derived, and are ^'.^ stories in height 
and 50x60 feet in dimensions, with a wheel 
house 14x40 and an otfice building 10x14. A 
perfectly secure pile dam supported by rock 
work gives a fall of eight feet, and an improv- 
ed American Turbine Water Wheel furnishes 
the motive power for the inachincrv emploved 
which is of the most approved construction, 
including one double and one single set of 
rolls, five buhrs, two for wheat, one middlings, 
one low grade and one corn buhr, and two 
double and one single purifiers. These mills 
transact both custom, merchant and exchange 
work and the leading brand which is known 
as "Emmon's Fancy Family Flour" is regard- 
ed by the trade throughout this section and bv 
consumers as the finest in the market. Mr. 
Samuel Emmons the present proprietor of the 
mills is a native of Butler County, Ohio, 
where he was born in 1S47. After completing 
his literajy education he became interested in 
milling interests and is thoroughly conversant 
with all branches of the business. ' He became 
a resident of Carthage in 1SS3, at which time he 
purchased and assumed the control of these 
mills and under the eflicient management of 
his son the mills now produce on an average, 
about sixty barrels of flour every twentv-lour 
hours with a capacity of 100 barrels every 24 
hours. 

GEORGE .H STONE, 

General Merchandlse. 
This house which was founded in 1S70, has 
steadily maintained its high rank since that 
time, constantly growing in popular lavor un- 
til its annual transactions at the present time 
will closely approximate $20,000 with a trade 
derived from Rush, Shelby and Hancock 
Counties. The premises occupied for the 
display of the large and varied stock, comprise 
one floor 22x75 f^^' '" dimensions with an ad- 
ditional room 14x50 feet in size devoted to the 
general grocery, hardware and queensware de- 
partment. The stock carried which is full, 
comjilete and comprehensive in every depart- 
ment, embraces full lines of Foreign and 
American dry goods, dress fabrics,white goods, 
woolens, domestics, notions, trimmings, mil- 
linery goods, men's, boy's and children's ready- 
made clothing, boots and shoes, hats and caps, 
fancy goods, queens and glass ware, hardware 
and cutlery, farmers' and mechanics' tools and 
implements, staple and fancy groceries, pro- 
visions, etc. The stock carried ranges from 



$.^,000 to $6,000 which is kept constantly sup- 
plied by fresh arrivals from the leading manu- 
facturers, importers, jobbers and producers in 
the metropolitan trade centres ol the Union. 
Mr. Stone is a native of the State of Connec- 
ticut, where he was born in 1S27. His parents 
removed to this state when he was but six 
months of age, and located in l-"ranklin Countv 
where his early years were spent principallv 
in agricultural pursuits. His mercantile ca- 
reer dates from 1S70, at which time he became 
a resident of this place. 

CARTHAGE B.\NK. 

The Carthage Bank was organized in the 
springofiS76 with an authorized capital slock 
of $100,000. The stock holders are Samuel 
B. Hill, Charles Henley, Henry Henley, Tho. 
Henley and Johnathan Newlin. The officers 
of the Bank are Chas. Henley, Pre-idcnt, and 
Samuel B. Hill, Cashier. 



HILL& COOK, 

CoiiNER Dri:g Store and Grocery. 
Familiarlv known as the "corner drug store" 
the establishment of .Messrs Hill Ac Cook, 
claims conspicuous recognition as among the 
representative mercantile houses of Carthage, 
both on account of the extent and variety of 
stock carried, the magnitude of its transactions 
and the high commercial rating of its enter- 
prising proprietors, whose present successful 
business enterprise was inaugurated in April 
iSSi. Their sales room which is eligibly and 
centrally located fitted up in modern metropol- 
iL-m style is 25x60 feet in dimensions and the 
stock carried embraces a general line of the 
purest and freshest drugs and chemicals, all 
the standard proprietory remedies and patenl 
medicines of the day. Perlumcries and toilet 
articles, paints, oils, varnishes, cigars, tobacco, 
notions, fancy goods, stationery, confectionery 
and druggist's sundries in good variety. Sta- 
ple and fancy family- groceries and provisions, 
queens and glass ware, table and culinary sup- 
plies, such as legitimately pertain to a well 
regulated first-class grocery establishment. 
Special attention i.s also directed to the accu- 
rate prep.iration of physicians prescriptions, 
family recipes and pharmaceutical compounds 
from the purest and best ingredients known 
in Materia Medica. Mr. Owen .S. Hill is a na- 
tive and life long resident of this township 
and was born in 1S3S. He resided on a farm 
until reaching his twen'y-second year, when 
he embarked in commercial pursuits subse- 
quently returning to the farm where he con- 
tinued until the formation of the present part- 
nership in iSSi. Mr. J. V. Cook was born in 
Wabash, Ind., in 1838. His earlv years were 
spent in agricultural pursuits but for the period 
of about thirty years prior to the inauguration 
of the present business he was employed as a 
commercial traveler, in which line he estab- 
lished a reputation as one of the most success- 
ful traveling salesmen in the state. He was 
connected with the union army for a short time 
during the rebellion and secured an honorable 



72 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



discharge from service, since which time tie 
has been chicflv identified with commercial 
pursuits. 

FRANK M. COFFIN, 

Jewelry, tjTATioNERY, Fancy Goods, 
Confectionery, N'oi'ions, etc. 
One of the most attractive mercantile es- 
tablishments of Carthage is the jewelry and 
fancy goods emporuim of Mr. Frank M. Cof- 
lin, which although established as recently as 
in December, 1SS3, has already attained a prom- 
inent rank among the representative business 
houses of Eastern Indiana. Mr. Cotlin occu- 
pies a salesroom 18x35 feet in dimensions titled 
up in modern metropolitan style with a work- 
room in the rear for the manufacture of pic- 
ture frames etc., and carries in stock an ad- 
mirably selected assortment of American 
watches, clocks and jewelry, solid silver and 
plated table ware, school and miscellaneous 
books, blank books, stationery, school supplies, 
notions, fancy goods, fine confectionery, pic- 
tures and frames, brackets and ornamental ar- 
ticles for home adori'.ment and decaration. 
His stock of moulding.-, in gilt, walnut etc., is 
large and complete and he maki-s a spccialtv 
of framing pictures in eitlier plain or highly 
ornamental style at the veiy lowest figures. 
He also devotes particular attention to fine 
■watch, clock and jewelry repairing in the most 
thorough and workmanlike manner. A visit 
to this model establishment and an examina- 
tion of the elegant and attractive stock will 
well repay the time occupied, whether persons 
are desirous of purchasing or not. and a cor- 
dial invitation is extended to citizens a[id non- 
residents by Mr. Coffin who will take great 
pleasure in exhibiting his treasures of art and 
beauty. Mr. Collin who is a native of Shelby 
County, was born March 31, 1S55. His parents 
removed to Hancock Countv when he was but 
one year of age and his early life was spent 
upon his father's farm. He became a resident 
of this place in 1879, and prior to the inaugu- 
ration of his present successful enterprise was 
engaged in the grocery business as salesman 
with Mr. E. T. Coffin, the well known mer- 
chant of Carthage. 

HILL & BUNDY, 

Manufacturers of Wood Pumps and 

General Blacksmiths. 
Amid all the changes, improvements and 
new inventions, which have been devised and 
introduced for the purpose of raising water 
from a lower to a higher level, none have stood 
the test ol time and met with such universal 
approbation as the old-fashioned wood pumps. 
The manufacture of the best varieties of 
pumps, as conducted by the enterprising firm 
of Hill i: Bundy constitutes one of our most 
important local industries, and when to this is 
added the transaction of a general blacksmith- 
ing business in all its branches, the operations 
of this representative firm assume proportions 
entitling them to prominent recognition in a 
historical review of the leading business 



houses of Rush County. The business was 
originally established as early as in 1S56 by 
Hill kS: Small, who conducted it succesfullv for 
about three years, when Mr. Small assumed 
the entire management and control, continu- 
ing until iSSj, when he disposed of his interest 
to the present firm. To Mr. Noah Small, one 
of the original founders of this business house 
is our present progress and development large- 
ly indebted; he it was who put into successful 
operation the first portable steam engine ever 
built in America. The pumps manufactured 
here are of the best material and tliorough 
workmanship, and meet with a ready sale 
througiiout this and adjoining counties, where 
their merits have been recognized for more 
than a quarter of a century. The firm also 
devotes special attention to horse-shoeing and 
general jobbing. Mr. Isaac Hill, one of our 
oldest and most highly respected native-born 
citizens, was born in Carthage in 1SJ7, and in 
addition to his identification with tiie above 
named branches of industry, has been for 
many years engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
Mr. William Bundy, also a native and lilc-long 
resident of this township, was born in 1S37. 
He is a practical blacksmith and iron worker; 
and also owns and operates a fine farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres, in a high state of 
cultivation, located about one and one-half 
miles from the village limits. 

JAMES BARBER, 

Merchant Tailor. 
The fashionable and popular merchant tail- 
oring establishment of .Kir. James Barber was 
founded in Carthage in 1S74 by the present 
owner, who conducted the business alone until 
October nth, 18S3, at wliich time his son, Mr. 
Morton H. Barber, was admitted to an interest 
in the house; he subsequently withdrew. The 
premises occupied are iS.vfio feet in dimen- 
sions, with work room in the rear;ard the 
firm carries in stock a small but select stock of 
piece goods for gentlemen's wear, and a large 
line of samples of the most desirable fabrics, 
from which they are prepared to fill orders and 
manufacture suits or garments at short notice, 
and upon the most reasonable terms. The 
system of keeping samples only is rapidly 
growing in favor with metropolitan tailors, and 
possesses many advantages, among which 
may be mentioned that patrons have a much 
wider range in making their selections; they 
are not compelled to pay interest, insurance, 
and expenses on large stocks, and no old or 
unseasonable goods are permitted by this 
means to accumulate on the hands of the tailor 
to be "worked off" upon those not fully 
informed as to fashions and fabrics. Mr. Bar- 
ber is a practical and artistic cutter, who 
devotes his personal attention to the workman- 
ship of garments, being thereby enabled to 
ensure faultless fits and thorough finish. Mr. 
James Barber is a native of Franklin County, 
and was born at Andersonville in 1S33. lie 
learned his trade at that place and at Rush- 
ville, and carried on business at Kokomo, 



CARTHAGE. 



73 



Howard Countj- for some time prior to becom- 
ing a resident of Carthage. Mr. Barber, in 
addition to the business above referred to, con- 
ducts a hotel business here, noted for its 
convenience and home like coml'orts: where 
he is prepared to luriiish excellent rooms and 
the verv best of meals by the meal, dav or 
veek, at reasonable terms; and as a desirable, 
quiet and home like stopping ]>laco lor guests 
his establishment commends itself to the 
favorable consideration of the traveling public 
as well as our resident ])opulation desiring good 
board and first class acconjmodations. 

ALFRED COX, 

Livery, Fked anu Sai.e Stahle. 
A wide-awake and progressive community 
without a well conducted liverv and feed sta- 
ble would be as much of an anomaly at the 
present ilay as would a livery stable without 
horses and carriages. The pleasant and pro- 
gressive village of Carthage is I'ortunate in the 
possession of a model establishment in this 
line, which, under the energetic and liberal 
management of iMr. AU'red Cox, may appro- 
pri.atcly take rank among the representative 
business enterprises of the jilace. These livery 
and boarding stables «ere originally e;.tah- 
lished in 1S70 by Mr. Drury 1 lolt, Jr., who 
erected the main liuilding now occupied, winch 
IS a commodious and conveniently arranged 
structure 33x50 feet in dimension'^, to which 
has been recently added by the enterprising 
proprietor, a shed 50 leet in length for the 
accommodation of carriages, etc. Thebuviness 
passed trom the hands of Mr. Holt into the 
possession of Hiatt Bros. & Headley, and then 
of Mr. Clark Gauze, who was succeeded by 
Mr. Cox in March, 1884. Five or six fine 
horses and stylish rigs are kept constantly on 
hand for livery purposes, and the stables have 
ample facilities for the accommodation of 
twenty-five head of horses at one time. A 
special feature is made of boarding horses by 
the feed, d.ay or week. In connecion with the 
business above named, Mr, Cox runs a regular 
hack carrying the United States mails between 
Carthage and Knightstown, and has been re- 
cently awarded the same contract for the ensu- 
ing four years. Mr. Cox, who is a native of 
Indiana, was born in 1S44, and previous to 
becoming a resident of Carthage in iSSo, con- 
ducted a tile manufactory at Spiceland for 
several years. During the war of the rebel- 
lion, he was among the first to respond to his 
country's call for aid, and enlisted in tS6i as a 
member of Co. D, Sth Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry. The regiment was first assigned to 
the Army of the West, and under General 
Curtis was actively engaged in the states of 
Missouri and Arkansas. From Helena it was 
sent to Vicksburg, where it participated in the 
memorable siege of that city, under General 
Grant — lying in the ditches and works for for- 
ty-nine consecutive days. It was then ordered 
through New Orleans toTexas.and at Indiano- 
la in that state it was re-organized, and came 
home on a veteran furlough under special pro- 



visions of the war department. The regiment 
was then assigned to the department of the 
cast, and reporting for dutv at Washington 
Citv, participated in General .Sheridan's event- 
ful campaigns in the Shenandoah Valley, and 
then proceeded to Savannah, Georgia, from 
which point it returned to Indiana and was 
finallv disbanded. Mr. Cox was honorablv 
discharged in September, 1865, after more than 
four years of active service in various depart- 
ment'-, and army corps, and a career equalled 
in variety and eventful incidents by few of 
those who took part in the struggle for the 
supremacy of the union arms. 

HENRY J. BOGART, M. D., 
Physician and Sukcf.on. 
Dr. Henry J. Bogart, resident physician and 
surgeon of Carthage, Rush County, is a native 
of Livingstone County, New ^'ork, where he 
was born in 1S33. Alter completing his liter- 
ary education he commenced the study of 
medicine at Tuscarora, New York, in 1S56, 
and in iS6i removed to Knightstown, Indiana, 
where he first commenced the practice of his 
profession. He attendcil the Cincinnati Col- 
lege of Medicine and Surgery, IVom which 
popular institution he graduated with honors 
in the class of 1S63. Duriiig the following 
vear he was commissioned by the Governor, 
"Oliver P. Morton, as Assistant Surgeon of the 
139th Regiment, Indiana \ohmteer Infantry, 
and proceeded to the front, where he joined 
his regiment — at that time in active service in 
the department of the west in Kentucky. He 
served in that capacity until September 1S64, 
when, at the expiration of his term of service, 
he received an honorable discharge. He has 
been a resident of Carthage since November 
l^th, 1S77, and has established a lucrative and 
successful practice throughout this and adjoin- 
ing towns, where he is highly esteemed as a 
public-spirited citizen, and a skillful and expe- 
rienced surgeon and physician. 

E. T. COFFIN, 

Groceries, Queensware, Etc. 
A leading house in this line in Carthage is 
that conducted by Mr. E. T. Coffin, who com- 
menced in this line on a comparatively small 
scale in 1S71, in a small room near his present 
commodious establishment, to which he 
removed in June, 1SS2. He now occupies one 
entire floor 17x75 feet with a basement for 
storage purposes 17x24 feet in dimensions, 
carrying a large and carefully selected assort- 
ment 01 the choicest varieties of staple and 
fancy family groceries, teas, cotTees, sugars, 
syrups, spices, canned goods, foreign and do- 
mestic fruits, provisions, queensware, glass- 
ware, and miscellaneous merchandise, such as 
legitimately pertains to this special branch of 
business. The average valuation of stock 
carried will not fall short of about $3,000; and 
his annual transactions at the present time 
range from $10,000 to ,$15,000— comprising the 
best grades at lowest prices consistent with 
quality and honorable dealing. Mr. Cottin, 



r 



74 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



■who is a. native of this town and county, was 
born in 1S3S. and previous to embarking in his 
present business, as above noted, was actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

CARTHAGE HOTEL, 

H. C. PuF.l.i's, Proprietor. 
The Cartha>,'e Hotel, conducted by Mr. H. 
C. Phelps, is worthy of more th.m passing no- 
tice; this house was erected by Mr. Pht Ips in 
1S7S, expressly for hotel purpose-.. The build- 
ing is a twQstory structure, 4JX60 feet in 
dunensions with an L. The first flour i.- occu- 
pied for oflice, sittin^'-room, dining room and 
culinary department; while the second floor 
contains parlors and several finely furnished 
sleeping apartments and guest chanibers. The 
dining-room has a sealing capacity for forty 
guests at one time, and in connection with the 
house are ample stabling nccoinmodations for 
the accommodation of travelers vi-iting Car- 
thage with their own conveyances. The house 
is kept in the best of stvie, and no efforts are 
spared by Mr. Phcl|>s and his assistants to 
render pleasant and agreeable the sojourn of 
his guests and patrons. Mr. Phelps i-. a native 
of North Carolina, in which state he was born 
in 1S2C. He came to tlii^ place when but a 
child of four years, with his parents. After 
reaching maturity, he has b.en chiefly identi- 
fied with agricultural interests up to iSSo — 
since which time he has been engaged in the 
hotel business. Mr. Phelps was among the 
first to volunteer in defence of our lountry's 
flag during the dark days of the rebellion, en- 
listing in July, :S6i, as a private soldier in 
Co. D , 19th Indiana Volunteers, which gal- 
lant organization participated in many of the 
most important and inemoraMe battles of the 
war, in the grand old Army of the Potomac — 
among the most notable of which were the 
battles of Lewingsville, Falls Church, Second 
Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Sharps- 
burg, Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Mine Run, 
Gettysburg, the engagements in the wilder- 
ness under Grant, the investment and siege of 
Petersburg, City Point, etc. At the expiration 
of his term of service in July, 1S64, he was 
honorably discharged; since which time he has 
been chielly engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
and in his present business. 

DUNN & HILL, 

Carriage Manufacturers and Deal- 

ERS IN Hardware, Etc. 
The carriage manufactorv now conducted 
by the enterprising firm of Dunn & Hill, one 
of the most extensive of its cla'-s in this sec- 
tion, was originallv established bv the senior 
member of the present firm in iS')6, and con- 
ducted by him until January, 1SS4, at which 
time the present partnership was formed, and 
to the original business was added a depart- 
ment for the sale of hardware, etc. The prem- 
ises occupied tor this latter branch of trade is 
20x66 feet in dimensions, were erected by Mr. 
Dunn as a carriage repository, and refitted for 
its present purposes in 1884. The stock car- 



ried embraces a general line of heavy and shelf 
hardware, cutlery, farmers', and mechanics' 
tools and implements, agricultural tools and 
machinery of the ir.o^t approved varieties; tin, 
copper and sheet-iron ware, house furnishing 
goods, etc. In the carriage departinent two 
repositories are occupied, one 20x40 feet, and 
one -'oxSo feet in dimensions, where is con- 
stantly carried full lines of finely finished 
work in carriages, buggies, phaetons, light 
wagons, buckboards, etc. ol' their own manu- 
facture. In the manuf.icturing departinent, an 
ajiartment 20x66 feet is occupied for black- 
smithing and wood-working, and a room 20xSo 
feet tor paint shop and finishing. Special at- 
tention is also devoted to repairing vehicles of 
everv description; agricultural implements, 
macinncry, etc., and to general jobbing in both 
the iron and wood-working departments. Mr. 
E.J. Dunn is a native of Upper Canada, and 
was born in 1S41. He is a jiraclical carriage 
maker, and learned the trade at Oswego, N. 
Y., coming to Carthage in 1S66. Mr. E. N. 
Hill is a native of this place, where his parents 
have resided for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury. Prior to the formation of the present 
partnershij), he occupied the responsible posi- 
tion of clerk for foreign and collection register 
in the First National Bank at Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 

LEVI BINFORD, 

Drugs, Medicines etc. 
In the establishment of Mr. Levi Binford 
on West Main St. the village of Carthage 
boasts a pharmacy which would reflect credit 
upon the enterprise of any community. This 
representative house was founded in 1S74 by 
Messrs. Sargent & Binlbrd, the former mem- 
ber of the firm retiring after about six months 
since which time the business has been con- 
ducted by its present enterprising proprietor. 
The sales room which is 18x75 '•■'^'' '" dimen- 
sions is fitted up ill modern metropolitan style 
and the stock embraces a complete and com- 
prehensive line of pure and unadulterated drugs 
and chemicals, proprietary medicines, drug- 
gists' sundries, soaps, perfumeries and toilet 
articles, paints, oils, varnishes, wall papers, 
window shades, fine stationery, wood, willow, 
queeens and glass ware and a great variety of 
miscellaneous merchandise appropriately be- 
longing to the above named branches of trade. 
A special feature is made of the prescription 
department in which physicians' prescriptions 
are carefully compounded from the purest and 
freshest ingredients. Mr. Levi Binford who is 
widely known throughout this section in con- 
nection witii the present house, is also associa- 
ted with the milling and lumber business un- 
der the firm name of Jnnkcn & Binford. noticed 
elsewhere in this work. He is a life long res- 
ident of this county and was born in 1843. He 
was t'orincrly engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness and still retains the exclusive agency for 
the following well known and thoroughly re- 
liable companies in either of which he is pre- 
pared to write policies upon the most favorable 



CARTHAGE. 



75 



terms. The "Insurance Company of North 
America." of Phi1a<lelphi;i, llio "Hartforii" of 
Conncctinil, the "Pliceiii v" of I lartford, Conn. 
and the "Continental" — Wi-slern Department 
of New York. He has been for many years 
identified with our local interests and is at 
the present time servint; his second year as a 
member of the town Council. He was ap- 
poined by the Court at Newcastle to the Re- 
•ceivershi|) of the Carthaye Turnpike Com- 
pany, anci ha^ frequently been called upon bv 
his fellow citizens to occupy positions of emol- 
ument and trust. 

J. B. SPARK.S, M. D., 

Physician and Sikgron. 
Dr. J. IS. Sparks, physician and surgeon of 
Carthape, Ru^h County, Indiana, is a native of 
■the Strife of Kentucky, where he was born in 
1833. He commenced the studv of medicine 
and surgrry in 1S53, in tlie office and underthe 
prcceptorship ol' IJr. S. D. Welch, at Nicho- 
lasville, Kt., and subsequcntlv entered the 
medical department of the Transylvania Uni- 
versity of Lexinylon, Ky., from which he 
■graduated in the class ol 1S57. He first com- 
menced the practice of his profession regularly 
in Mercer County, Ky., in 1856, and remained 
-there until 1.S6S, wi'th the exception of the 
time spent in the army. In iSfii, he was com- 
missioned l)y the Governor of Kentucky as 
Surgeon of the 19th Kentuckv Infantry, in 
■which capacity he served for one year, when 
he was promoted to Surgeon-in-Chief of Gen. 
W. J. Laiidrum's brigade of Gen. A.J. Smith's 

■ division of the 10th Army Corps of the Army 
o( the Mississip|ii, where he served for about 
eighteen months, w hen he received an honora- 
ble discharge on the grounds of physical disa- 
bility, and on the reeommendation of the medi- 

•cal director of the corps. Returning to civil 
life, he resumed the practice ol his profession, 
and in 1S6S, removed to Knightstown, Ind., 
■where he remained for three vears, and then 

located at Charlottesville, practicing there until 
1681, ■when he established his present olBce in 
Carthage, and has secured a lucrative and suc- 

■ cessful practice in this and adjoining sections. 

WILLCUTT.S BROTHERS, 
Meat Market. 
The neat market of Messrs. Willcutts Bros, 
■was established in 1S79 bv its present enter- 
prising proprietors, each succeeding season 
witnessing a gratifying increase in the volume 

-of its transactions. The salesroom which is 
fitted up in niodern metropolitan stvle, is 20x30 

.feet in dimensions, and among its other fix- 
tures, has a fine cooler or refrigerator tbr the 
preseravtion of meats during the warm 
months. The firm slaughters and prepares 

•their own meat, using on an average about 
fitteen fat beeves and a proportionate number 
of small animals per month. They carry con- 
stantly on hand the choicest varieties of fresh, 
salt, and smoked meats, lard and sausages, 
bologna, poultry and game in season. The 

ilndividual members of the firm, Messrs. Samuel 



and William Willcutts, are both natives of 
Wayne County, this state, and in connection 
with their house here, they visit with wagon 
twice each week, Charlottesville and Cleveland, 
and the country about the neighborhood once 
each week. 

OLIVER S. COFFIN, 
Blacksmith. 
The name of Oliver S. Coffin, as a skilled 
and experienced blacksmith and worker in iron 
and steel, has been familiir to the residents of 
this section for more than twenty vears, he 
having been, with the exception of a few 
months, continuously engaged in this iinport- 
ant industrial pursuit. His shop is 25x30 Icet 
in dimensions, and all work performed by him 
Is guaranteed to give satisfaction in both quali- 
ty and price. Mr. Coffin devotes special atten- 
tion to horse-shoeing and to the proper treat- 
ment of horses' feet and hoofs, and to ironing 
carriages, buggies and vehicles of every 
description. He also makes a prominent 
specialty of repairing carts, wagons, carriages' 
buggies and agricultural implements, and to 
general jobbing in all branches of iron and 
wood-working. Mt. Collin, who is a thorough 
mechanic and practical horse-shoer and black- 
smith, was burn in Hancock County in 1S41. 
His early life was spent on a farm," and after 
learning his trade and becoming a proficient 
workman, he embarked in business on his own 
account, and has established a liberal town and 
coimtrv trade. 



J. L. HUBBARD, 

Harnes.s, Saddles, ktc. 
Mr. Hubbard inaugurated his present suc- 
cessful enterprise in this place in 1S70. At 
his sales room may be found at all tiines a 
most desirable line of harness, saddles, col- 
lars, bridles, blankets, robes, whips, horse 
clothing, stable supplies and turf goods, while 
in his manufacturing department special at- 
tention is devoted to the manufacture of har- 
ness, to general repairing and jobbing and to 
carriage trimming in all its branches. The 
best of material only is used, skilled assistants 
employed and thorough workmansliip and 
perfect satisfaction guaranteed in quality and 
price. Mr. Hubbard was born in Henry 
County, Ind.. in 1S42. In 1S62 actuated by his 
patriotism and love of the Union he enlisted 
as a member of the 19th Indiana Battery of 
Light Artillery, Capt. Samuel ]. Harris, and 
with that organization in the grand old Army 
of the Cumberland participated in all the bat- 
tles .md bivouacs, from the battle of Perrys- 
ville to the grand final review of the Union 
Army and its disbandment at the National 
Capital in June 1865. Among the more im- 
portant engagements in which Mr. Hubbard 
took part may be especially mentioned in this 
connection, the Battle of Perrvsvilie, Ky., 
Chickamauga. Mission Ridge, Lookout 
Mountain, Ringold, Ga., Hoovers' Gap, Al- 
tona Mountain, Resacca, Peach Tree Creek, 
Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesbo. J, 



76 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



Sherman's triumphal March to the Sea, Ben- 
tonville, N. C , Kingston, N. C. and numerous 
minor skirmislies and encoimters v.-jth Mor- 
gan's guerrillas and other armed band-, of the 
enemy at various points. 

N. B. WADE. 

Harnf.ss, .Saddles, etc. 
Under the etlicient management of Mr. B. 
X>. Fodrea, this house lias acquired a more 
than local celebrity, and built up a tlourishing 
and steadily increasing trade throughout this 
and .idjoining towns. The stock carried em- 
braces a fine line of hand made single and 
double harness, saddles, bridles, collars, etc., 
whips, robes, blankets and horse equipments 
and stable supplies generally. Special atten- 
tion is paid to the manufacturing fine harness 
to order, and of general repairing in all 
branches. Another prominent fe;ilure in 
which this hou^e has achieved deserved popu- 
larity is the manufacture of fine and heavv 
custom boots and shoes for ladies' gentlemen's 
and childrcns' wear. Mr. N. B. Wade the 
enterprising proprietor is a practical harness 
maker and sadler, and commenced business in 
this line at Charlottesville. He subsequently 
removed to Knightstown. where he still carries 
on the business, the management of the Carth- 
age establisliinent devolving upon Mr. Fodrea 
who is a native of this State and a thoroughlv 
practical boot and shoe maker, familiar with 
all the details of these dirt'erent branches of 
industry. Prior to assuming the management 
of this house he had enjoyed an experience of 
more than ten years in the boot and shoe 
trade at other locations. 

MISS MARY JUNKEN, 

MiLLIMERY. 

The attractive display of fine French and 
American millinery goods at the popular rooms 
of Miss Mary Junken, in Carthage, cannot 
fail to delight the aesthetic and cultured taste 
of the ladies, ever ready to admire and appre- 
ciate beauty and art, especially when made 
subservient to their personal adornment. Miss 
Junken who is an accomplished milliner and 
artistic trimmer, was en<;aged in this special 
branch of industry for some time prior to estab- 
lishing her present successful business in ibS4, 
having been employed by other parties both 
in Carthage and Cambridge City, and entered 
the arena of trade with afuUJcomprehension of 



the requirements of the gentler sex and a taste 
cultivated by extended experience. Her millin- 
ery parlors aud trimming department occupy 
a room 16x25 ''-'^' '" dimensions, in which she 
ofters for the inspection of the ladies of Carth- 
age and adjoining towns, an admirably selected 
assortment of the latest styles andshapesin hats 
and bonnets, flowers, wreaths, buds, feathers, 
plumes, tips, birds, ribbons, laces, iriinmings.or- 
naments etc., together with a fine line of trim- 
med pattern hats and bonnets embmcing the 
latest Parisian and metropolitan modes which 
she is prepared to duplicate in everv particu- 
lar or to vary to meet the tastes ot her patrons 
retaining at the same time those leatures 
which the fancy of modern fashion has pre- 
scribed as pre-etnincntiv requisite to style. 
Although so recently establi-lied on her own 
account. Miss Junken has already secured a. 
large and lucrative trade and her establish- 
ment is rapidly winning its wav to popular fa- 
vor in the estimation of tttuse interested in 
the fascinating art of fashionable millinery. 

JUNKEN & BINFORD, 

Saw Mills and Lu.mber. 
These mills were originally erected nearly 
twenty years ago. Mr. Junken has been iden- 
tified with the mills since 1^72. December 25 
1SS3, the present fim was organized. The 
mill is two stories 30x68 teel in size and is 
thoroughly equipped for the nianut'acture of 
lumber, dimensions stuff etc., the machinery 
being propelled by steam. This firm also car- 
ry in stock, lutnber, scantling, lathe, shingles 
etc. for local trade. Mr. junken is a native of 
this county and state and was born in 1S2S. 
Mr. Binford will be found noticed elsewhere 
in connection with his drug and pharmacy es- 
tablishment in this place. 

HENLEY BROS., 
Woolen Mills. 
These mills were established in 1S42 by 
Henrv Henlev. Woolen yarns, blankets, cas- 
simeres, jeans, etc., are the principal products, 
and about 25,000 pounds of wool are used an- ■ 
nually. This is the nio.st important manufac- 
turing concern here. 



The other more important firms here are- 
D. S. Hollowav, flouring mills; Johnson Bros.,. 
dry goods; J. C. Hill & Co., grain and seeds. 



ARLINGTON. 



This now flourishing town was origin- 
■ally laid out by Mr. Peter Sajip and the 
first lots sold in 1830. Mr. Levin Bergut 
laid out additional lots in I80I. The 
town was originally called Burlington. 
In 1832 Mr. Fletcher Tivis laid out an 
addition. Although its growth has not 
been very extensive or rapid it has al- 
ways maintained considerable importance 
as a grain centre and trading point. 

About 1848 the lirst railroad in the 
state, known as the Knightstown & Shel- 
byville ]\ailroad, was built through this 
section. It was constructed of "flat bar" 
and abandoned about four years later. 
Mr. Levin Burgut was the first Justice of 
the Peace. The first school teaclier was 
Hiram 11. Trimbly who taught in a log 
cabin on James Havens farm. The first 
store was started by Joseph Hamilton of 
Rushville. The first blacksmith shop was 



by Peter Sapp, and the first grocery by 
Henry Burt who was also the first post- 
master. 

The name of the town was changed to 
Arlington some years ago and the place 
now has the advantages of excellent ship- 
ping facilities as offered by the Cinein- 
cinnati, Hamilton and Indianapolis Rail- 
road. It is located in the western part of 
the county about thirteen miles from the 
county seat with which it is connected by 
rail. At the present time it contains a 
population of about 400 inhabitants, with 
a number of quite important mercantile 
concerns, a good public school building, 
a hotel and a uund)er of excellent private 
residences. The readers attention is called 
to the following series of descriptive 
sketches, which will serve to give a more 
correct idea of Arlington's enterprise and 
importance. 



RUCKER BROTHERS, 

Drugs, Groceriks, Hardware and 
Agricultural Implkme.vts. 
One of the most important and extensive 
■mercantile establi^hment.s of Arlington which 
has within the past four rears, from a com- 
paratively' small commencement, attained pro- 
portions of considerable mairnitude, is the well 
known and popular house of Rucker Brothers. 
This house was established in 18S0 bv its pres- 
ent enterprising proprietors, at whicii time the 
commodious building now occupied, 24x60 
feet in dimensions, was erected bv Dr. T. H. 
Rucker. The stock embraces a general line 
of the purest and freshest drug-, and chemicals, 
paints, oils, proprietary medicines, toilet arti- 
cles, and druggists' sundries generallv. In the 
rear portion of the salesroom is the general 
office and the prescription department, where 
special attention is paid to the accurate prepa- 
ration of physicians' prescriptions and laniilv 
recipes. They also carry a full line of stujil'e 
and fancy groceries, teas, colVees, sugars, 
spices, canned goods, notions, and table and 
culinary supplies, heavy and shelf hardware, 



cutlery, farmers' and mechanics' tools and im- 
plements, and all of the latest improved 
designs of agricultural machinery, including 
reapers, binders, mowers, plows, harrows, cul- 
tivators, etc. The trade of this house which 
now reaches fully Sir.ooo per annum, is 
derived from Rush and adjoining counties, and 
is steadily increasing witli each succeeding 
season. Dr. T. H. Rucker, the senior member 
of this representative tirm, is a native of Flem- 
ing County, Kentucky, where he was born in 
1S39. He came to this county with his |)ar- 
ents when but three years ot" age, and atter 
completing his literary education, commenced 
the studv of medicine in iS')0. He attended 
the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, and 
commenced the practice ot his profession in 
this town in 1S6+. At that time he had lim- 
ited means, but by strict attention to his pr.ic- 
tice and his business operations, he has 
amassed a handsome property, owning the 
building occupied by the firm, and other valua- 
ble property. He still continues to practice 
medicine, his private office being located a 
short distance from the store. Mr. S. -V. 



78 



STATE OF IMDIANA. 



Rucker, his brother and business associate, 
was born in Rush Coiintv in 1S4S. and prior to 
the formation of the present partnership, occu- 
pied a responsible position as a member of the 
railroad detective Ibrce, for ITnion Railwav 
Company, with headquarters at Indianapolis. 

HAVENS HOUSE, 

J. P. Havens, Proprietor. 
For nearly half a century has Mr. J. P. 
Havens, of the Havens House, been identified 
with the hotel interests of Arlinj;ton as pro- 
prietor of the only hotel in town. In the early 
days of the settlement of the town, some time 
previous to [S40, Mr. Havens opened a iiouse 
for the accommodalioM of the traveling public 
on Main St., where he successfully conducted 
the business until 1S7S, when he purchased 
the commodious and conveniently arranged 
two story frame building which he now occu- 
pies, which is furnished in good style with all 
homelike conveniences, and kept in the very 
best manner. The tables are supplied w ith an 
abundance of subslanlials and delicacies of the 
season ; and no efl'ort is spared to render this 
house pleasant and agreeable to guests. Mr. 
Havens is a native of Fleming County, Ken- 
tucky, and was born in iSii. He came to Ohio 
with" his parents and settled near Hillsboro, 
where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
with his father, who was one of the pioneer 
Methodist preachers of the country. In 1S32, 
the subject of this sketch was married and 
commenced business as a wagon and carri;ige 
maker shortly afterwards in this town. He is 
a practical mechanic, and in connection with 
his hotel business, still devotes Ins time to his 
trade, enjoying a wide acquaintance and the 
esteem of the entire community. 

W. M. BALL, 

Planing Mills. 
As contractor and builder, proprietor of the 
finely equipped planing milU, and also of the 
popular blacksmith shops in Ariington, Mr. 
\V. M. Ball occupies a prominent position in 
connection with the local industries and busi- 
ness enterprises of this progressive and thriv- 
ing town. Mr. Ball is a native of Mercer 
County, Penn., where he was born in 1S32. 
He has been a resident of Arliiigion since liSjo 
and has devoted the greater portion of his 
attention since that time to the business of 
carpentering and buildmg. Thoroughly prac- 
tical and experienced in all the details of this 
important branch of industry he is prepared 
to lurnish at short notice, plans, specifications 
and estimates for any description of public or 
private buildings, and to contract for the erec- 
tion and eomplelion of the same, furnishing 
all the materials if so desired. In iSSo, in 
partnership wilhMr. Jacob Beckner, he erect- 
ed the planing mill which he now conducts and 
the business was carried on by Ball i: Beckner 
until iSSr when the latter retired. The mill 
building is 34x60 feet in dimensions and con- 
tains all the requisite machinery for planing, 
matching, tongueing and grooving, mortising 



etc., and for the manufacturing of door and 
window frames, stair work and inside finish, 
the motive power for which is supplied bv one 
12 horsepower engine and boiler. In addition 
to the branches of business above enumerated, 
Mr. Ball is proprietor of a blacksmith shop 
where spicial attention Is paid to horse-shoe- 
ing, ironing uagons, carriages, buggies, etc., 
and general jobbing and repairing. 



BIRT & FRANK, 

Stoves and Tinware. 
The stove emporium and tin-ware manufac- 
tory of Messrs. Birt ^S: Frank was founded in 
January, 1S77 by Bi-ckneri: Birt. In iSSHothe 
former retired and Mr. Frank was admitted to 
an interest in the business, the firm name and 
style becoming as at present. This representa- 
tive house, which is a credit to Arlington, has 
steadily increased. The premises occupied for 
sales and manufacturing purposes are 22x50 
feet in dimensions, and in the former depart- 
ment may be found a fine line ol the most 
popular styles and makes of cooking and heat- 
ing stoves, ranges, gi ates, hollow ware, kitchen 
utensils, and tin, copper, and sheet-iron ware 
of their own manufacture. In this latter 
department a leading specialty is made of 
sheet-metal ware, and of roofing, spouting, 
guttering, general jobbing and repairing. The 
annual transactions of this house will not fall 
short of $r2,oc», wiih an established trade — 
embracing Rush, Shelby and adjoining coun- 
ties. Mr. John S. Birt, who is a native of 
Arlington, siient the greater portion of his 
youth in Kokomo, where he leiirned the trade 
of tinner and metal-worker. During the first 
year of the war, in August, 1S61, he entered 
the service of the United States as a member 
of the 39th Indiana Regimental Band, and ac- 
companied that regiment as a musician in the 
Kentucky campaigns, receiving an honorable 
discharge in 1S62. Mr. Edward Fr ink was 
born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in 1S56, 
and first learned the trade of carpenter, subse- 
quently abandoning that occupation and learn- 
ing his present trade in this town. Both mem- 
bers of the firm are expert and experienced 
workmen in this line, and devote their personal 
atlention to the general management of the 
business. 



W. A. MINOR, 

liooT AND Shoe Manufacturer. 

Making a special feature of manulacturing 
fine boots and shoes to order, using the best 
material only, and guaranteeing reliable work- 
manship and pel feet tits, Mr. W. A. Minor 
has during the brief existence of his popular 
establishment in Arlington secured a large and 
lucrative local patronage, and built up a trade 
which is steailily increasing with each suc- 
ceeding month. With an experience at other 
locations of nearly twenty years Mr. Minor 
opened his present shop in this place, April 4, 
1SS4, determined by strict attention to his busi- 
ness and a system of honorable dealing with 
his patrons to achieve that position among his 



ARLINGTON. 



79 



contemporaries and competitors which is the 
chief ambition ol all enterprising merchants 
and manul'acturers, to leau hit. chosen avoca- 
tion. That he has succeeded in this laudable 
endeavor is evident from the fact tiiat those 
who have once patronised him are now his 
regular customers, and new ones are const.mt- 
\y beini< added to the list. Mr. Minor is a na- 
tive of Richmond, Indiana, and was a resident 
of that city from the date of his birth in itJ^S, 
till locating in this town as above note'.. He 
learned his trade m tliat city, becoming an ex- 
pert and accomplished workman and was em- 
ployed by other parties prior to embarking in 
business on his own account. 

J. W. GLA.SS, 

Attorney at Law and Notary 

Public. 
So intimately allied to the business interests 
of the community and its general thrift and 
prosperity in a great variety of ways, is the 
legal proiession that a historical sketch ol its 
most salient features would be noticeably in- 
complete without special mcnlion of the rejire- 
scntative members of the bar. Mr. J. W. 
Glass, counsellor and attorney at law and 
notary public, whose office is now located in 
Arlington, is a native of Rusli County, and 
was born in 1S3S. After completing his liter- 
ary education, he commenced the study of law 
in the office of T. B. Adams, Esq., and was 
admitted to the bar in 1S74, becoming a resi- 
dent of Arlington in 1S7S. Mr. Glass gives 
special attention to the practice of law in the 
courts of Indiana, and to the collection of 
claims and accounts in any section of the 
Union. He was commissioned notary public 
by the Governor of Indiana in 1S71, and is 
prepared to acknowledge deeds and all legal 
papers requiring the notarial seal, and to per- 
form all the duties pertaining to this office. 
During the war of the rebellion, he was among 
the first to respond to the call for troops to aid 
in suppressing the war, and in 1S61 enlisted in 
Co. F, Sth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, which was subsequently assigned to the 
western department, and served under General 
Prentiss at various points on the Mississippi 
River. Mr. Glass was honorably discliargcd 
in 1S62 on account of physical disability, and 
after his return to civil life, was engaged in the 
recruiting service in this county until 1S53. 
He twice recnlisted, but was each time 
rejected by the examining board of surgeons 
on account of impaired health; but he rendered 
effective aid to the Union cause by his voice 
and example during the troublous times of the 
civil war, even after leaving the service. In 
addition to his legal connection and practice, 
Mr. Glass represents, as agent in the town, 
the following well known and reliable fire in- 
surance companies: the .Etna of Hartford, 
Connecticut; the Phccnix, of Hartford; and 
the Home, of New York — in cither of which 
he is prepared to accept risks and write policies 
upon the most favorable terms. 



DR. J. W. GREEN & SON, 

J. \V. Green, J. C. Grekn — Resident 
Physicians and Surgeons. 
Dr. J. W. Green is a native of this county 
and state, where he was born in iSj^. He is 
a regular graduate of the Rush -Medical Col- 
lege of Chicago, and has been in the practice 
of his proiession here lor the past forty years. 
His son was admitted to partnership in March, 
iSSo, and has. since been engaged in practice 
here; he was born here in it)6o. Alter com- 
pleting his literary education, he studied 
medicine with his lather, and graduated t'rom 
the Medical College of Indiana in 18S0. As 
intelligent and accomplished members of the 
profession, these gentlemen occupy a promi- 
nent position in .social and political circles — 
keeping pace with the progressive spirit of the 
age. 



H. L. RUCKER, 

General .Mf.rcmandisk. 
The commercial houses and mercantile 
establishments of Arlington arc as a rule char- 
acterized by a degree of enterprise and liberal- 
ity in their management not surpassed by con- 
temporaries in anv of the interior towns of the 
State, and especially will these remarks ap])ly 
to the representative house of H. L. Rucker, 
upon whose shelves and counters may be found 
one of the most complete and comprehensive 
as.sortments of general merchandise in Rush 
County, comprising full lines of Foreign and 
American dry goods, dress fabrics, domestics, 
notions, ladies' and gentlemen's furnishing 
goods, ready made clothing, hats, caps, boots, 
shoes, crockery, queen's and glass ware, staple 
and fancy groceries and miscellaneous mer- 
chandise in great variety. Each department is 
thoroughly stocked with the best articles in 
that special line, and owing to the facilities en- 
joyed by the enterprising proprietor for secur- 
ing his supplies direct from importers, jobbers 
and producers, he is enabled to quote prices 
which cannot be readily duplicated in the large 
cities. The premises occupied fir sales pur- 
poses are 18x50 t'eet in dimensions, and the in- 
ducements offered to purchasers are such as to 
commend this establishment to the favorable 
consideraiion of all classes of the community. 
This house was originally established by Mr. 
Jacob Bickner who was succeeded by Wm. J. 
Scott, and he in turn by the present proprietor 
March ist. 1SS4. Mr. Rucker is a native of 
Arlington and was born May 13,1843. He was 
formerly engaged in the carpentering and 
building business, having learned that trade 
while a young man. About thirteen years 
ago he abandoned that branch of industry and 
entered the store of his father, and has since 
that time been actively engaged in commercial 
operations in this place where he is widely and 
favorably known as a public, spirited and en- 
terprising citizen and a successful merchant 
whose record for strict integrity and fair and 
honorable dealing has never been called "n. 
question. 



80 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



MILI.ARD & ADDISON, 
Stoves and Tinware. 
Although establibhed a» recently as Febru- 
ary, 1SS3, this house has already secured a 
liberal patronage from the citizens ot'this and 
adjoining towns. The stock carried comprises 
a fine line of the best styles of cooking and 
heating stoves and ran;,'es, hollow ware, 
kitchen utensils, tin, copper and sheet-iron 
ware, and house-furnishing goods in great va- 
riety. In the manufacturing department, 
special attention is devoted to roofing, spout- 
ing, guttering, and general job work in all 
branches of sheet-metal working, and to the 
production of tinware for the sales department. 
Mr. Addison, who is a thoroughly practical 
tin, copper and sheet-iron worker, is a native 
of this count\', and was born in Kiplev Town- 
ship in 1S57. He learned his trade in this 
place and in Rushville and prior to embark- 
ing in his present successful enterpri>^e, was 
engaged at the same branch of business at 
Manilla. In addition to the above enumerated 
specialties, Mr. Addison is exclusive agent in 
this town for the celebrated Norris cultivator 
and grain drills, which are deservedly popular 
with the agriculturalists and farmers. 

A. GEYER, 

Groceries, Provimo.ns, Boots, Shoes, 

ETC. 

Mr. Geyer commenced business in Arling- 
ton as a manufacturer of boots and shoes in 
1872, and in 1S7S received the appointment of 
Postmaster which position he has since held, 
performing the duties thereof with the strictest 
fidelity. In the fall of iSSo he added to the 
original business a fine stock of staple and fan- 
cy family groceries, table and culinary supplies, 
provisions, notions, cigars, tobacco, etc., and 
has built up a prosperous and steadilv increas- 
ing trade. In the former department he makes 
a leading specialty of manufacturing to order 
fine and common grades of boots and shoes 
for ladies' gentlemen's and children's wear, 
and carries an admirable assortment of fine 
custom work, paying particular attention also 
to repairing in all branches. Mr. Geyer is a 
native of Rhine Bavaria, where he was born 
in 1S39. He came to the United States when 
but two years of age, with his parents, landing 
at }3uft'alo via. Quebec, and has been a resident 
of this state since 1S61. In the following year 
he enlisted in the service of his adopted country 
as a member of the 6yth. Indiana \'olunteers, 
Col. T. W. Bennett, and with that gallant or- 
ganization participated in many of the most 
memorable and evcnttul campaigns of the 
war. The regiment was first assigned to the 
•department of the Cumberland, next to the 
Army of the Trans-Mississippi and subse- 
quently tothedepartment of the Gulf Among 
the more important engagements in which 
Mr. Geyer with the old U'jlh took an active 
part may be especially mentioned, the battles 
at Richmond, Kentucky, Chicasaw Blulf, 
Arkansas Post, Thompson's Hill, Champion 
Hill, Black River Bridge, the seige and Cap- 



ture of Vicksburg, the seige of Jackson, the 
Red River Campaign, the seige of Blakclv 
Ala. and numersous other engagemenls of mi- 
nor importance. After three years of active 
service at the front Mr. Geyer received an hon- 
01 able discharge July 5 1S65, and has since been 
chiefly engaged at his trade and in his present 
business. 



B. W. S. LOWE, 
Blacksmith. 

Intimately associated with all departments 
of the mechanic arts, with comnierrial and in- 
dustrial enterprises and with agricultural pur- 
suits as the main source of supplies for 
those useful articles and implements composed 
of iron and steel, the avocation of the black- 
smith commends itself to the favorable consid- 
eration of all classes of the community as be- 
ing at once one of the most ancient, honorable, 
useful and important of industrial pursuits. 
As a representative arti/an in this line we no- 
tice the enterprising black-mith of Ar'ington, 
Mr. B. W. S. Lowe, who commenced business 
in this town in February 1SS2 after a practical 
experience of nearly' twenty ye;irs at other 
locations. His shop is 30x36 'feet in dimcn- 
sions.containing all the requisite appliances for 
the successful prosecution of the business in 
all its branches. Mr. Lowe makes a leading 
specialty of horse shoeing upon scientific prin- 
ciples, with special reference to the protection 
and preservation of the hoof, and of ironing 
wagons, carriages, buggies etc. in the most 
thorough and workmanlike manner. He also 
devotes special attention to repairing vehicles 
of every description, agricultural implements 
and machinery, and to general jobbing in all 
departments of the business. Mr. Lowe is a 
native of Kentucky and was born in Harrison 
County in 1S30. He came to this town in iSSi 
previous to which time he had been proprietor 
of a similar establishment at Hooktown, Nich- 
olas County, Ky., for about sixteen years. Me 
is a thoroughly practical mechanician and. 
worker in iron and as an expert in his line has 
few equals in this section of the State. 

BAGLEY & NEFF, 

Livery, Boarding and Sale Stables. 
The livery, boarding and sale stables of 
Messrs. Bagley cV NefT are among tlie most 
thoroughly equipped and well conducted es- 
tablishments of the kind in Eastern Indiana, 
and a great public convenience to the residents 
of Arlington and vicinity, as well as to the 
commercial travelers and others whose busi- 
ness or pleasure necessitates the employment 
of conveyances to interior points. These sta- 
bles were established in July 1SS3, bv Messrs. 
Bagley & Kiser, the latter d"isposingbf his in- 
terest in the business April ist 1SS4, at which 
time the present partnership was formed. The 
stables which are 40x70 feet in dimensions are 
well arranged and neatly kept, and have ample 
accommodations for 40 or 50 head of horses at 
one time. In the livery department eight fine 
horses are kept for hire with numerous bug- 



ARLINGTON. 



81 



gies, carriages, light wagons and otlier vehicles 
adapted to a variety' of purposes which will be 
let upon tlie most reasonable terms, while in 
the boarding and sale departments are admira- 
ble facilities for taking the best of care of 
horses and teams by the day or weak. Mr. 
Lewis B.igley is a native of the State of Mis- 
souri where he was born in 1S59. He came to 
this county when four years of age, and prior 
to embarking in tlie livery business he was for 
several j'Cars engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. Mr. Clias. Netl" a native of this state 
was born in 1S56, and was also engaged in 
Jarming prior to the formation of the present 
partnership. Both gentlemen are well and fa- 
vorably known m this community as conscien- 
tious and reliable horse men, whose represen- 
tations under all circumstances will be loiuid 
to accord strictly with facts. Parties desirous 
of purchasing or those having horses to dis- 
pose of cannot do better than to entrust their 
interests to this well-known and popular tirm. 

RICE & JACKSON, 

Fruiis, Confectionery, etc. 
Among the more recent accessions to the 
mercantile establishments of Arlington, is the 
popular sample room, fruit and confectionery 
house of Messrs. Rice & Jackson, which al- 
though established as recently as in March, 
1SS4, has already secured a lucrative and grow- 
ing trade among the residents of this and ad- 
joining towns. This enterprising tirm occu- 
pies a salesroom iC)\:6 feet in dimensions, car- 
rying in stock foreign and domestic -wares and 
liquors, cordials, etc., also the cool and 
fresh lager beer, together with other standard 
invigerating beverages and mild stimulents. 
This is the only establishment in this section 
of the county authorized by the law of the 
State to supply the public with pure wines 
and liquors, the firm also keeps a well selected 
stock of choice Havana and domestic cigars, 
manufactured tobacco for smokers and cliew- 
ers use, cigarettes, pipes and smoker's articles 
in variety. Mr. James Rice a native of Ken- 
tucky, was born in Bracken County, Ky. in 
1S46, and prior to becoming a resident of this 
State at the time the present business was es- 
tablished was engaged in the same line at 
Claysville, Ky., for a number of years. Mr. 



W. W. Jackson, also a native of the Blue 
Grass State, was born in Harrison County in 
1S59. He was also engaged in the same busi- 
ness at Claysville before removing to Arling- 
ton as at)Ove noted. Both members of the 
firm are active, energetic and enterprising, de- 
termined to conduct their establishment in 
strict accordance with law and order. 

SAMUEL SHEPPARD, 
Saw Mills. 
The Saw Mills now conducted by Mr. .Sam- 
uel Sheppard of Arlington, contribute no little 
to the commercial thrift of the county, their 
products meeting with a ready sale, principal- 
ly iT\ the cities of Indianapolis, Cincinnati, 
I-Iamilton and Richmond. These mills were 
erected in 186S by Mr. Edgel Barnard and 
since that time have passed through several 
hands in (he order of succession here given, 
Milton Gardner, Forbes fi Son, \Vm. Snyder, 
Brand Ix Scott, Wilson & Sheppard and the 
present proprietor who assumed the sole con- 
trol and management in October, iSSi. The 
mill is a two story structure 30x90 feet in di- 
mensions, the machinery which is first class in 
every respect being propelled by one 3^ horse 
power engine and boiler. The average daily 
capacity of the mill is 6,000 feet, and the prod- 
ucts are chiefly Ash, Oak, Poplar and some 
Walnut. Mr. Sheppard is a native of Missouri 
but came to this county when but one year 
old. He was raised on a farm, and in 1S61 he 
enlisted in Co. G. 52d. Ind. Inf, served in Ten- 
nessee and on the Mississippi River, He 
participated in the battle ot Fort Donaldson 
in which he was severely wounded and was 
compelled to lay in the hospital at Cincinnati 
for about ten months. He subsequently join- 
ed his regiment at Memphis, Tenn., after 
which he was in the battle of Mobile, Fort 
Blakely, Ala. and battle of Tupelo Miss,, be- 
sides other skirmishes, receiving an honorable 
discharge in Sept. 1865. He afterward en- 
gaged in farming and then in lumber and 
milling business. 

Other firmes here are .SmI. Beckner, drugs; 
Enoch Coddington, general store; J. P. Lcas- 
ure, harness; Henry Mazur, general store; 
W. M. Downey, meat market. 



MANILLA. 



This thriving little phice \\-a,-i laiil out 
in 1878, by tlie Murphy Bro^. A Mr. 
True was the firi^t blacksmcth ajjil oLhi 
the first postmaster. 

The town is hicated on the JefferJKjn- 
ville, Muilison and ln<linn:ip'ilL-! Kiiilroad, 
10 miles west of llushville aear die i^hel- 
by County line. It is in the miiL-^; of a 
rich tmd fertile fariuiuir district for whidi 
it is (juite a trade centre, and eontaiii.'i a 



popuhitLoa of near 5()0 inhaliitants. It 
contain.^ ai.-Jo, a p:ad«l school with tlu'ee 
tuiicljerH and 104 pnpll*. a €hrisri;5-iv a-nd 
a: 3'teth<!)di.m church,. :l lodj^e of Masons 
aaad one of Red. Jteii:: be.'^idew II .<tore.,s-, a 
eaTri:nre niauufactoiy, a hlncksniitii shop, 
two hoteh' ;uid ;i. livery stable. !«■ f-he 
pn^» whiidi folLiw will, be fouud a. se.fie.« 
of sl&.'tches derei'iptive of the ti.«e aiul 
pti)p'esr*of tJie pi;inci]jnl concerns Iters. 



DR. W. E. 1!.\R.SUM, 
Grocery, Etc. 
The popular i;iocerv hou-e oTDi-. W. E. 
Barnum in M.inili.n was e^tabli-'ht'(i in Mav, 
:SS3, and lia> met «itli a mo-t gr;uil'vinii and. 
eneouraijins; deijree of success ajiioriir ail 
cla-'Sus of tlic cu?iinuinitv. Tiie pritnaist^ occu^- 
pied for >ales purposes comprise one room 
18x40 feet in dimensions, in whicii i>r also lo- 
cated tl)e post office; and the !vtoci< carried 
embraces a .general line of st.ijr'le ami fancv 
groceries, notions, table and culLnarv ^ipplies, 
and miscellaneous merchandi-e.. saicIi as letjiti- 
matclv pertains to this special brancli of trade. 
Dr. Barnvnn possesses unrivalled lacilitic-s for 
procuring his stock direct trom unportei's, 
I'obbers and producers, and hi.s pnce^are inva- 
riably the lowest consistent with sjood jjoods 
and honorable dealiu;;. Dr. Barnum, who is 
a native of Indiana, liorn near Xoitii Vernon 
in 1S53, is a regularly educated physician and 
surgeon, a graduate of one of the tir-t medical 
universities of the country, and has been suc- 
cessl'uUy cn^as^ed in the practice of medicine 
and sursjerv in Manilla for the pju^t I'ouj- ve;irs. 
As a general practitioner, he has^ met with 
success, and is hi^hlv esteemed as an accom- 
plished and skilliul physician. He al.so make.s 
a specialty of filling and extracting- teeth, and 
as a dental surgeon has lew equals in this- sec- 
tion. He has, in tlie course oi his protessional 
career, made a special study of women's dis- 
eases and their treatment, and has- discovered 
a certain remedy for piles — 'juamnteeing a 
permanent cure or no pay desired. Lnthc re- 
moval of tumors, wens, etc, he has been 
remarkably successful, having trcateil some of 
the most obstinate and diiTicult cases on rec- 
ord. In addition to his proiessiunai duties, 
and the management of his mercantile inter- 



e>t», i:e is- al.so pos-lina.--Ier 01 .M;>iii!i.i, havirtif 
nemaved hi.s cnmniis-sion in June, i-SSi. 

ZE-TKE & nre.STER, 

HoTKi: AVD SCk^vt S'T.vrkpt. 
ETotel.H^ h;ire been .ippropri.itelv caJl(«l tlie 
huui-mark.<> of civilizaUon and the inile-siones- 
ofini)dei-n progress. With tjie rapid- gj-owth 
of our inland townf^ .ind cities, incre^tsed ac- 
i miminodations for travelers^ and the public 
haver been found necess-nrv, and Nfanilla lur- 
rrishes no exce^ition. 10 this- general rule. '1-het 
old e.vtahlis-i)eii and po|nil.u- hotel forttlei'lv 
comlucttd by Xfr. Jtis^ejih Z<;ike, has recentlv 
undergone a complete reiTovatinn ; nunierDus 
improvements and additions have been made, 
and Mi:. Jasper Ue.stei- admitted to an interest 
in the managemenr of tlie business. Tiie hotel 
building is a two-story s-lructure, <:<i>;44 leet in 
dimensions, and as-now (inis-4ietl, liimis-hed and 
conducted, is one of tiie be.st hotels- in the 
interior — with .'unple accnmmotlations for thir- 
ty guests at one time. The rooms are neatlv 
and comfortably furnished and kept irrthel>est 
of order. The tttble<^ arc supplied with an 
abundance of suhstantials as well as luxuries, 
and no eflorts will be spared bv the gentle- 
manly pronrietTirs- to render pK-asant .and 
agi-eeahle the stav of their guests and patrons. 
Messrs. Zi'ike -V Hester al.sn carrv on, in con- 
nectionwith theirhotel business, a meat mar- 
ket, where residents of Manilla andvicinitv- 
can pmcurethe be.st varieiies of I'resli, s;vltand 
smoked meats, provisions^ etc, at the most 
reasonable terms. Bntti members ofthe'firin 
ai-e natives and lifelong residents of IndianSv 
They arc widely and favorable known 
throughoxit this section, and visiiors to our 
ple.a^ant village, cnmniercial tr-aveiers and 
others, will find at this hotel- all the comforts- 



"MANILLA.. 



83 



of a home, «"ith the luxuries ofthe?«.ason at 
popular prices. 

JAMES SMART, 

Carriage Mavufacturer. 
The carriage ar.d waj^on -vorlcs of Mr. 
James Smart claim prominent reco;j^nition 
among the repix:--er,tative industries of Rush 
County. These worlcs were cstablislie^l in 
Manilhi, in iS7''i, bv their present proprietor, 
who had been for four vears previously 
engagfd in the same line of business at another 
location- The ^T<?,und space occupied covers 
an are2of65viJ?5 feet, upon w.hich is erected a 
suitable and commodious buildini,', with all the 
requisite appliances for the successful prosecu- 
tion of the business in all its dep;u-tinents. Mr. 
Smart, who is ably assisted in the manufac- 
turing depaitnietit by his four sons, all of 
whom are skilleii and experienced wagon- 
makers, turns out some adniir.ible specimens 
of workmansliip, niakinsj a leading.; specialty of 
carriages, buggies, spring waf;ons and light 
\'ehicles of every dcscriptinn. lie also devotes 
special attention to repairing vehicles of all 
kiTids ,ind agricultural iiiiplfuients. and general 
jobbing in both the wood and iron working 
departments. .Mr. Smart is a native of Ire- 
land, where lie was born in 1S36. He is a 
thoroughly pr.iotical wood worker and 
carri.ige-smitli, familiar with all branches of 
the business, and devotes his personal atten- 
tion to the management of the business, which 
has, under his energetic and efiicient conlrol, 
ste.tdily increased wilh each succeeding year. 
He is is one of our l)est known and m.ist high- 
ly respected citizens, and was elected justice of 
the peace, April jth. 1^154, a position for which 
he is eminently qualifiL-d, and which he fills 
with dignity and impartiality. 

JOHN GROSS, 

Dry Goods, GitocERir.s, Etc. 
Occupying a position second to none among 
the n.'presentative mercanlile houses 01 Rush 
County and E.istern Indian:i, is the general 
store of Mr. John Gross of Manilla, which was 
establishedby itspresentproprietor in 1S65, and 
which, for a period of nearly two decades, has 
maintained a high rank among its contempo- 
raries; both on account of the extent and 
variety of merchandise comprising its stock, 
the magnitude of its transactions, and the high 
commercial rating of its projector and present 
proprietor. Mr. Gross occupies a building 
.;o.\40 feet in dimensions, and carries in stock 
a gCTieral line of foreign and -American drv 
goods, ready-made clothnii:, notions, boots and 
shoes, hats and caps, ladies' and gentlemen's 
furnishing goods, hardw.-.re and cutlerv, 
queens and glassware, staple and fancv gro- 
ceries, canned goods, teas coffees, spices, and 
miscellaneous merchandise of almost everv 
description, the enutneration of w hich would 
occupy lar more space than can be allotted m 
the present work. Mr. Gross is an extensive 
dealer in grain and handles annually not less 
than jo,ooo bu hels. He is always prepared 



to purchase for cash, or in exchange for mer- 
chandise, gr.iin in atiy quantity, for which the 
highest ruling rates will be paid. The trade of 
this popular house has increased in a four-told 
ratio since lis inception nineteen years ago, 
and is steadily growing, at the present time 
deriving its patronage not only from the citi- 
zens of Manilla, but ,ilso from a wide area of 
adjacent territory. Mr. Gross is a native of 
Germany, where he «as born in 1S29. He has 
been a resident of Indiana for nearly thirty 
years, and during the greater portion of this 
time engaged in mercantile pursuits. With the 
characteristic thril't of his race, he has bv in- 
dustry, economy, and strictly honorable deal- 
ing, accumulated a handsome property, and 
established a trade which will compare favora- ■ 
biy with that of any similar house in this sec- 
tion of the Slate. 

KING'S HOTEL, 

W. L. King, Prupr. 
Among the leading representative business 
men of Rush County, there are few v\ hose en- 
terprise, busines sagacity and ability are worthy 
of more conspicuous recognition than Mr. W. 
L. King of >ianill 1, and a brief sketch of the 
various enterprises in which he is actively in- 
terested cannot be omitted from the present 
historical review of our local industries and ac- 
tivities. In M.n-ch lySo, Mr. King opened to 
the public the pojuilar hotel wliicli hears his 
name and which has acquired a deserved pop- 
ularity with the better class of the travelino- 
public. The hotel building is a two-story 
structure 50x50 feet in dimensions, containing 
nineteen well turnished and neatly kept rooms 
and ske|)ing apartments. The tables are sup- 
plied with the choicest viands of the season, 
served in an attractive and appetizing form, 
and regular boarders or transient guests are 
accommodated at the popular price of $1.00 
per d.iy. In connection with the hotel Mr. 
King condu ts a finely stocked livcrv 38x95 
feet in size where he keeps for livery purposes 
seven fine horses and a number of carriages, 
buggies and sample wagons for the accommo- 
dation of commercial tra\elers. He has ample 
accommodations for boarding horses bv the 
day or week, and parties visiting Manilla by 
their own conveyances can haic their teams 
cared for by experienced hjstlers and attend- 
ants. He is alsoownerand proprietor of three 
of the finest stallions in this section, known 
throughout a wide area as "England's CJlorv," 
"Hainbletonian King" and "Morgan Hellfoun- 
der," which are under the imnieciiate cl.arge 
of Mr. John Rice as keeper. England's Glory 
took the first premium at the Indiana State 
P'air when only 5 \ ears old lor a heavy draft 
horse, and atterwards received $100 as a prize 
for showing six of the best colis, it the same 
place. The other stallions have an enviable 
record for speed and for reliabiliiv, and hare 
been awarded premiums and testimonials at 
state and county fairs. Mr. King is also ex- 
tensively interested in the lightning rod busi- 
ness, and dealer in the most approved styles of 



84 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



copper conductors, rod ornainents, weather 
vanes, silver and gold balls, etj., and einplovB 
two traveling aijenls in this siiecial brancli of 
his business. He enjoys the amplest facilities 
for putting up improved rods on all kinds of 
buildings, and residents of Rush and adjoining 
Counties will find it to their advanla'.je to pat- 
ronize a home dealer in protecting their prop- 
erty from damage by lightning. Mr. King is 
a native of this state and was born in 1S53. 
He enjoys a large and influential circle of busi- 
ness acquaintances in Eastern Indiana, and is 
favorably known as a gentleman of integrity 
and honor in all his transactions and dealings. 

CHAS. J. HEADLEE, 

(jROCERirs, Pfjovisions, Qi.ei:n"s«'are, 

ETC., Main St. 
Among the comparatively recent accessions 
to the business interests of Manilla worthy of 
special consideration is the popular grocery, 
provisions and family supply store of Mr. 
Chas. J. Headlee which although founded as 
recently as in 1SS5, has already si-cured a lib- 
eral share of public patronage and a trade 
which has been steadily increasicig with each 
succeeding month. Mr. Headlee occupies for 
business purposes a two story fran-.e structure 
20x40 feet ill dimen.-.ions, carrying in stock an 
admirably selected Hue of choice family gro- 
ceries, both staple and fancy teas.colVee.s, spices, 
sugars, syrups, soap, canned goods, foreign 
and dome-tic fruit-, vegetable and country 
produce in se.ison, queensware, glassware, 
confectionery, tobacco and cigars, notions, 
small wares, groceries, sundries and miscella- 
neous merchandise legitimately pertaining to 
this special branch of commerce. Mr. Head- 
lee is a native and life-long resident of this state 
and was born in 1855. In the business in 
"which he has embarked under the most favor- 
able auspices he enjoys facilities for procuring 
supplies direct Irom importers, jobbers and 
producers not surpassed by those of any con- 
temporaneous establishments in this section, 
and he is thereby enabled to oticr to the resi- 
dents of Manilla and its surroundings special 
inducements, such as cannot be readily dupli- 
cated by any similar house in this or adjacent 
counties. 

CYRUS E. TREES, 
Grain & Lumber. 
As in many other sections of the state grain 
and lumber constitute the two main f'atures of 
Rush County's products and the basis of its 
present commercial prosperity and thrift. The 
tine I'orests, now disappearing before the on- 
ward march of civilization, and the fertile fields 
teeming with their wealth of life giving grain, 
furnish the supplies which the enterprise of 
man coverts into cash and ships to tlie markets 
of the old and new world. A representative 
dealer in these important commodities whose 
aggregate annual transactions reach a consid- 
erable sum is Mr. Cyrus E. Trees, whose head- 
quarters are located in the thriving village of 



Manilla. Mr. Trees established his present 
business in this place in iSSi, and as an evi- 
dence of the magnitude of his op'.'raHons, it 
may be stated that he handles aniuially from 
75,000 to 100,000 bushels ol grain and from 
2,000,000 to 3.000,000 feet of hardwood lumber 
which he ships in car load lots to the principal 
cities anti trade centres of the Un'on both east 
and west. He is also proprietor of a large 
grain elevator of improved construclion, with 
admirable facilities for receiving and discharg- 
ing grain, and with a storai;e capacity of 50,000 
bushels at one time. A steam engine of 18 
horse power is employed for loading and un- 
loading cars, and one as-i-tant regularlv on 
duty, other help being engaged as the exigen- 
cies of the business demand. Mr Cyrus E. 
Trees is a native and life-long resident of this 
state and was born in 184S. He has been per- 
manently identilied with the grain and lumber 
interests of Rusli County lor several years 
and as an energetic and enterprising business 
man and successful merchant is entitled to 
prominent rank among the reprcseniative men 
of this section of our great and prosperous 
state. 



E. S. JARRETT, 

Drugs and Groceries. 

The combination under one roof of two of 
the mtjst important branches of our modern 
commercial system renders worthy of con- 
spicuous recognition in the present volume 
the well known establisliment of Mr. E. S. 
Jarrett, of Manilla, as one of the representative 
mercantile houses of Rush County, and which, 
although established as recently as in May, 
1683, tias taken a prominent rank among its 
older contemporaries; both by reason of the 
extent and variety of merchandise carried in 
stock, and also on account ol the present mag- 
nitude and steadily increasing scope of its 
transactions. Mr. Jarrett occupies one fioor 
20x40 feet in dimensions for the display of his 
admirably selected stock, which in the drug 
department embraces a general line of the 
purest and freshest drugs and medicines, the 
standard proprietary remedies of the day, 
paints, oils, varnishes, soaps, sponges, perfu- 
meries, toilet articles, stationery, druggists' 
sundries, and pharmaceutical compounds of 
every description, and in which also special 
attention is devoted to the accurate prepara- 
ration of family recipes and physicians' pre- 
scriptions. In the grocery department may be 
found a choice selection of staple and fancy 
articles in this line — teas, coffees, pure spices, 
fruits, canned goods, sugars, syrups, cigars and 
tobacco, and miscellaneous merctiandiae, such 
as legitimately pertains to the business and 
associated with table and culinary supplies. 
Mr. Jarrett, who is a native of Indiana, was 
born in 1S43, and has been identified with these 
special branches of trade for several years prior 
to embarking in fiis present successful enter- 
prise, in wfiich he has secured a large and 
steadily growing trade throughout this section. 



MANILLA. 



85 



CREED & QUERY, 

BLACKSMmib AND Wagon Makers. 

The avocation of the blacksmith and worker 
in iron and steel is undoubtcdiv the most im- 
portant of all the mechanical arts, and upon it 
in a great measure depends all the other indus- 
tries and occupations; and without it the 
wheels of commerce would be blocked; the 
hum of our lactories and workshops would 
cease, and our a;;rici.dtural resources be 
crippled if not destroved. In reviewing our 
local industries, and representative business 
house-, it is therefore a[ipropriate that due 
recognition should be accorded to those en- 
gaged in this important branch of trade. The 
leading establishment of Manilla in this special 
line is that so successt'uUy conducted b_v the 
enterprising firm of Creed i: Query, whose 
buildings occupied for blacksmith shop and 
wood-working department cover a ground 
space of 5(jxi20 feet. These popular shops 
were e-tablished bv the present firm in if^tio, 
and their business since that time has steadily 
increased. 'I'hev manufacture to order, farm 
and spring wagons, etc., and make a leading 
specialty of repairing and general jobbing in 
both the iron and wooj-working deiiarlnients, 
employing two assistants. This firm devotes 
special attention to horse-shoeing upon prac- 
tical scientific principles, and in this line their 
work is not surpassed by that of any similar 
establishment in the state. The individual 
members of the firm are \V. II. Creed and Ja- 
cob Query ; both of whom ars natives of Indi- 
ana, and are thoroughlv skilled and practical 
blacksmiths and wagon makers. All work 
turned out by them, whether new jobs, repair- 
ing or horse-shoeing, is warranted to give sat- 
isfaction and prove exactly as represented. 



JAMES NEILL. 

Harnes.s, Saddle.s, etc. 
Prominent among our local industries and 
contributing in no small degree to the commer- 
cial and industrial thrift of our pleasant and 
prosperous communilv, \\c notice the harness 
and saddlery emporium of -Mr. James Neiil. 
This house was established in iSSo by other 
parties with Mr. Neill in charge of the business. 
In iSS3 Mr. Neil took possession of the busi- 
ness and at once infused new life into it. The 
stock embraces single and double hand made 
harness of his own manufacturing, saddles, 
bridles, whips, robes, collars, blankets and 
horse clothing generally, stable supplies and 
turf goods, and articles especially pertaining 
to this branch of trade. Mr. Neill also devotes 
special attention to fine custom work and to 
general rcpairingin all branches at short notice 
and upon the tnost reasonable terms, guaran- 
teeing all work turned out to be equal to the 
best in workmanship and finish. This is the 
leading establishnntit of its cl.ass in Manilla 
and its trade derived Irom a wide area of sur- 
rounding territorv both in Rush and atiioining 
Counties. Mr. Neill is a native of Madison, 
JelVerson County, Indiana, and was born in 
1S55. He is a practical liarness maker and 
saddler, thoroughlv conversant with all depart- 
ments of the business and with the require- 
ments of the trade in this section. His har- 
ness ranges i.n price from $10 to .$30 for light 
buggy harness and 1^30 to $35 for heavy or 
light double sets, and patrons may implicitly 
rely upon all representations made by him as 
to quality or value. 

There are also here the firms of Hill ic 
Zeike, hardware; J. C. Simpson, general mer- 
chandise; Robert Craig, druggist. 



GLENWOOD. 



This enterprising iind prosperous vil- 
lage, on line of Rush ami Fayette coun- 
ties, is located on botli sides of the Union 
and Kusli County Pike, the dividing line 
between Iliisli anil Fayette counties at this 
place, with post office in Fayette County, 
and is situated on the C. H. &, I. Rail- 
road. The town was originally called 
Vienna and the post office Steels, up to 
ten or twelve years ago, at which time 
the present name was adtipted. 

The town was laid out in 1832 by Dr. 
Jeff. Helm and Samuel S. Durbon, but 
for many years enjoyed but a moderate 
degree of trade and prosperity. Among 
the early settlers in this section we men- 
tion Samuel S. Durbon, Dr. Jeff. Helm, 
Joseph Cook, Thomas Ochiltree, William 
Clawson, John Gatterell, Sanuiel McKee, 
James and Jesse Murphy and IMoses Wi- 
ley. Among the earlier merchants were 
Alfred Thom])son in 1834, Thus. Smiley 
in 1835, Ward Williams in 183(1, the lat- 
ter serving as the first postmaster. The 
first plasterer was Jonathan Woodcock. 
Among the first carpenters were Thomas 
Ochiltree and Samuel Bodine. First 
blacksmith was Alfred Thompson who 



kept the first hotel and who some claim 
was the first postmaster though Dr. Arn- 
old is of the opinion that Thomas Smiley 
was the first. The first sadiller was Gid- 
eon Klink. Dr. Jef. Helm was the first 
physician. Dr. John Arnold followed, 
1836 to 1841. Reuben Logan (now judge) 
was the first school teacher. The Vienna 
and Rushville Pike through this place 
was the first pike built in the county, in 
1855. The first church was the United 
Presbyterian in 1847. The M. E. Church 
■was built in 1862. 

This village is surrounded by an agri- 
cultural section which for richness of soil, 
superiority of farm residences and build- 
ings and wealthy farmers, is not surpas.sed 
in the state. It contains a ])opulation of 
over 300 inhabitants, with business houses 
which will compare favorably with those 
of any place of its class in the state, many 
excellent private residences, a fine two 
story brick public school building costing 
?o,8(J0, and two churches. We append 
in the pages which follow historical and 
statistical sketches of the leading business 
concerns here. 



SISSOX & CHEW, 

Harowark, Sto\ es, Tinware, Agri- 
cultural Implements, Et... 
This enterprise dates its origin to less than 
two years ago, havint; been starteJ by them 
in their present busine>-s roorns, in March, 
1SS3. The premises occupied embrace a finely 
arranged business room 24x^0 feet in dimen- 
sions, with a ware room in the rear lor storage 
purposes 20x24 feet in size. The business of 
this house embraces the manufacture of tin, 
copper, and sheet-iron ware, ;iiid the prompt 
and ctlicient execution of roofing, spouting, 
guttering, job work and repairing associated 



with this branch of business. Besides carry- 
ing in stock a full line of tinware, they also 
carry a general line of hardware, farmers' and 
mechanics' tools, table and pocket cullerv, 
kitchen utensils, builders', blacksmiths' and 
«agon-maktrs' supplies, an J the best makes of 
heating and cooking stoves in the market, 
both lor wood or coal. They are also agents 
for many of tlie mo^t popular agricultural 
implements in the market, embracing reapers 
and mowers, seif-bindcrs, drills, walking and 
riding plows and cultivators, etc. During the 
past year this house has enjoyed a liberal and 
gradually increasing trade from both Rush 



GLENWOOD. 



87 



and Fayette Counties, giving liberal promise 
of becoming; one of the leadin.; commercial 
houses of this class in this sectitjn of the state. 
The individual members of tliis firm are Mr. 
Dallas Sisson and Mr. A. L. Chew, both of 
whom arc experienced business men. Mr. 
Sisson is a native of Rush County, \\l\ere he 
■was born in 1S4S. After completing his liter- 
ary education, he was ibr several years 
engaged in teaching in various parts of the 
state, up to near the time of becoming con- 
nected with the present enterprise. Mr. Chew 
is a native of Warren County, Iowa, where he 
was born in 1S57. He learned the trade of 
tinner and rooler and is a practical and expe- 
rienced workman, though he was formerly 
associated with the grocery and pi ovision trade 
previous to engaging in his present successful 
business undertaking. 

E. J. THOMPSON, 

Post M.\sTEt{; Dealer ix Grocep.ies 
AND Provisions, and Insurance 
Agent. 

Mr. Thompson was born at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, in iSj;, and first engaged in business on 
his own account at Everton, Fayette County, 
in 1S53, where he remained up to 1S73, when 
he removed to Connersville wiiere he lield the 
position of deputy sherilf for nearly two years. 
He then removed to Alpine, where he was in 
the employ of others for about one year, when 
he removed to this place. He was appointed 
postmaster at Everton in 1S61, under the first 
year of Lincoln's administration, which posi- 
tion he held for about twelve years at diflcrent 
times. Coming to this place, he was appointed 
postmaster under President Hayes' adminis- 
tration, which position he still holds. Mr. 
Thompson engaged in his present business in 
18S1, and occupies a room tor office and busi- 
ness purposess .;ox3o feet in di;nensions on the 
Fayette County side, in which he carries a full 
line of groceries and provisions, canned goods, 
tobaccos, cigars, notions, stationery, etc. — 
enjoying a liberal local patronage. As insur- 
ance agent, he represents the following well 
known and reliable companies: ^Etna, and 
Pha'nix of Hartford, Connecticut, and Home, 
of New York. For these companies he has 
written policies on about twentv five of the 
prominent buildings in this section. 
ax interesting documext. 

Mr. Thompson's son, J. E. Thompson, now 
holds a paper in manuscript, which was writ- 
ten by his grandfather, Joseph D. Thompson, 
in 1S19, which traces the genealogy of the 
family as far back as 1696, with cresl' coat of 
arms and motto, from which we copv. The 
Thompson coat of arms is a crest-shield, with 
sun in upper left hand margin, and stars on 
centre, with arm extended above holding 
wheat; thcmotto-"A/u!o Man' j^mim Fofdayt" 

The following is copy of paper: "Maurice 
Thompson, baronet and treasurer of the excise 
of the family of Thompson, came out of the 
North and settled in the County of Hertford, 
/rom whom descended Maurice Thompson of 



Havershire, who was a very eminent merchant 
and Governor of the East India Company, 
He married Hellcn, daughter of Owen Liger. 
of Wales, and by her had a son uiimeil (ohn, 
which son, in the 25 (year) of Charles 2d 
(reign), being a person of good accomplish- 
nients, was created a baronet, and was in Par- 
liament at the timeof the "Papist plots," where 
he appeared an earnest man in searching into 
it, and a great forwarder of the "bill of exclu- 
sion." He was also chosen in the next Par- 
liament, called the Oxford Parliament — and 
was of those who was for the speaker's keep- 
ing the chair after the king did approve of 
them. In the first Parliament of King James, 
the first; he was again returned a meniher, and 
on the Rebellion of Monmouth, gave his vote 
for the retainder of him, and vet was verv zeal- 
ous against arbitrary power, and a standing 
army. In the year ifiSS, he was among the 
first that signed the association to invite the 
Prince of Orange and afterwards joining him 
in the west and continuing a member of the 
Commons House until the year 1696; was then 
created a barron and made one of the Com- 
missioners of Admiralty. He married Fran- 
ces, daughter of .\rthur". Earl of Anglesse, and 
dying in 1710, by her left Maurice, his only 
son, who is the present Lord Haversham, ai'.d 
eight daughters, whereof .Mary, the 3d (daugh- 
ter) was married, now, 17:3, Earl of Anglesse, 
and the said Lord Haversham marrving Eliza- 
beth, daughter to iimith of the County of 
Hertford, Esquire, but is now, 1723. a widow- 
er." (Datedj Carlos, 29th June, 1S19. The 
only omission is in the failure of Joseph D. 
to mention in his paper, his lather, who was 
the son of Maurice la^t named. Joseph D. 
Thompson was married to Miss Lucy Haugh- 
ton, 7th month, 21, 1S19 — the subject of this 
sketch now holds the marriage certificate — 
They sailed from Liverpool, England, to tiiis 
country, August nth, 1S19, landing at New- 
York, September i^th, 1S19. They settled in 
Philadeljihia, and at'ler two years r'einov ed to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, from where thev removed to 
Fayette County, this slate, and' settled on a 
t'arm near Everton (then Lawtown) in 1S23. 
Joseph D. Thompson was the first postmaster 
of Everton, and gave it the name. He died in 
1S3S, leaving a widow who survived until June 
I3lh, 1SS4. Two children survive (Edwin J. 
Thompson, and his sister Isabella Trusler); 
also twenty-four grand children and sixteen 
great grand children. The genealogy on Mr. 
Thompson's mothers side dates from iSf>2, as 
follows: "Sir Wilfrq Haughton lived at 
Haughton tower, Lancashire, England. His 
son Isaac, born in 1663, first seltled in Edden- 
berg. Kings County, Ireland; his son John, 
born January 19th, 1692; his son I~a:ic mar- 
ried Mary Watson, and allerward Margareth 
Webster. Joshua was his son by his second 
wile; he married Mary O'Brian, and afterward 
Eleanor Wilson, daughter of the first wife, 
was born at the town of Carlos, Ireland, Janu- 
ary 27th, iSoo, and married to Joseph D. 
Thompson as before noted. The coat of arms 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



of the Haughton family is a crest with white 
bars acrof^s, bearing the motto, "Malgie le 
Tort" Copy is held by Mr. Thompson. 

M. COMBS, 

Dry Goods, Gkoceries, Queen'Sware, 
Glassware, Boot.s, Shoes, Hats, Caps, 
NoTio.Ns, Etc. 
The business here dates its origin to about 
two years ago, and occupies one of the finest 
business rooms in the pl.icc, being 2o.\0o feet 
in dimensions; about 20 feet of the rear is 
separated by an arclnvay, givinga line apjiear- 
ance to the room, the rear being devoted to 
grocerio-; and queensware. The establishment 
in this place is in charge of his ^on, .Mr. .\. II. 
Combs, and the annual transactions will aggre- 
gate from $5,000 to $S,ooo; and embracing a 
general line of dry good.s, groceries, queens- 
ware, boots, shoes, hats, caps, clothing, etc. 
The facilities this house enjoys for receiving 
its supplies t'roin tlie leading importing and 
jobbing houses in the country is not surpassed 
by any other dealer in this line in tliis section 
of the state; and tlie judicious business policy 
which characterizes its operations insures its 
claim to a gradually increasing trade from the 
residents of these two counties, on the borders 
of which this tiiriving place is situated. Mr. 
Combs also owns and conducts a general store 
at Memphis in tliis state, where he is the rail- 
road and express agent for that place. Mr. M. 
Combs is a native of this state, and has for a 
period of ten to filteen years, been associated 
with commercial pursuits, and isjustly entitled 
to liberal notice among the most public-spirited 
merchants. Mr. A. H. Combs is also a native 
of this state, and after completing his early 
education, gave his attention to telegraphy. 
He was telegraph operator at Memphis, and 
afterward held the position in the office at this 
place up to about the time of taking charge of 
the store of his father here. 

Z. T. CRAWP'ORD, 

Hardware, Stoves, Agricultural 

Implements, Etc. 
Although it is still less than one year since 
this house was established, it has already 
secured a liberal share of trade in this line, 
and promises to outstrip its older competitors 
in this line in the two counties from which its 
trade is drawn. The premises occupied em- 
brace a fine business room 22x50 leet in 
dimensions, in which is carried a I'ull line of 
general hardware, embracing farmers' and 
mechanics' tools, table and pocket cutlerv, 
wagon-makers', blacksmiths', and builders' 
supplies, tin and hollow- ware, etc.; also the 
latest improved heating and cooking stoves, 
reapers, mouers and self-binders, pumps, 
plows, walking and riding cultivators, thresh- 
ers, etc., coal, lime and cement, doors, sash and 
blinds. The sales of this house embrace both 
the counties of Rush and Fayette, and show a 
gradual and constantly increasing patronage. 
Mr. Crawford is a native of Milton, Wayne 
County, this state, where he was Ijorn in 1&47. 



lie has already a liberal business experience 
in this department of trade, and was formerly 
connected with the handle factorv of Bovce lSj 
Crawford at Muncie, Indiana, for a period of 
eighteen months previous to engaging in his 
present enterprise on his own account. 



GLENWOOD HOTEL, 
D. S. Alzeno, Pkoi'r. 
Mr. Alzeno, the owner and proprietor of this 
house, is a native of Franklin Countv in this 
state, where he was born in iS^g. His father 
was engaged in the general dry goods trade at 
Laurel for a number of years, and he was en- 
gaged as assistant in the business chietiv up 
to 1S74, when he commenced business on liis 
own account, continuing in it up to the tmic 
of coming to this place in iSSo. He erected 
his present hotel building expressly for the 
purpose for which it is used, and has since de- 
voted himself to this business. The main 
building is two-stories high and 2Sx.^2 feet in di- 
mensions with an addition of ample space for 
dining room and culinary department in the 
rear, and other out buildings upon the lot, af- 
fording all desirable conveniences. The hotel 
contains 13 well arranged rooms, with general 
ofiice, dining room, kitchen and sitting room 
on the first floor, while the second floor is de- 
voted to sleeping apartments, which are well 
furnished and ventilated and kept in the most 
perfect order for guests. The table is provided 
at all times with the best the market alfords 
and the cooking is such as to make this house 
a favorite with all who are fortunate enough 
to have been numbered among its guests. Mr. 
AUeno also deals in fine tobaccos and cigars, 
of which he carries at all times a large and 
varied stock of both chewing and smoking to- 
baccos and the most popular brands of Ha- 
vana and Domestic cigars. 



J. P. STILTZ, 

Dealer in Groceries, Glassware, 

Clothing, etc. 
This house dates its origin here to iSSi, at 
which time it was started by Mr. Stiltz in a 
comparatively small way and small building, 
directly opposite his present location. In 1SS3 
he erected his present commodious business 
house 1^2 stories high and 24x70 feet in di- 
mensions, which is recognized as being not 
only the finest business house in the place, but 
one which will compare favorably with the 
best business houses in this line inojir leading^ 
metropolitan cities. The stocks carried cm- 
brace a full line of staple and fancy groceries 
and provisions, queensware, glassware, tinware, 
crockery, wood and willow ware, notions, to- 
baccos, cigars, etc., besides a full line of ready 
made clothing for men and boys, selected witli 
direct reference to his trade, his annual trans- 
actions now reaching between $12,000 to S15- 
000. Mr. Stiltz also erected on the lot adjoin- 
ing his business house a fine private residence, 
one room of which is devoted to millinery 
goods, embracing newest styles and patterns 
of ladies' hats and bonnets, flowers, feathers. 



GLENWOOD. 



89 



ribbons., trimmings, etc., and is conducted by 
Mrs. Stiltz and ^iiss Alexander. Mr. James 
P. Stiltz, to wlinm this sixlion is indebted lor 
the business so fully noticed above and (his 
town lor the valuabie and substantial improv- 
nients, is a native of Maryland, where he wa^ 
born in 1841. Previous tocon\in^ west he was 
employed as clerk in Baltimore, Md., oomins; 
to this place in 1S73. Here he was engaged in 
clerking up to the time of engaging in busi- 
ness on his own account as above noted. 

H. \V. NICHOLS, 

Saw M1LI..S AND LuMUKR Yards. 
The business in«hich Mr. Nichols is en- 
gaged, was started by him at Falmouth over 
20 years ago, and has contributed largely to- 
ward the supplying both the local and loreign 
demand. The premises occupied lor the manu- 
facture of lunihcr euibraces a 2 story structure 
about 25x70 feet in dimensions, besides boiler 
and engine room in which he is provided ivith 
large and ellicient circular saws and latest im- 
proved appliances I'or tins department, the ma- 
chinery being propelled by a 40 horse power 
engine and boiler, giving a ca)iacity of about 
5,000 feet per day. In addition to supplying 
to order and contracting for the supply of ev- 
ery description of hard wood lumber, fencing 
posts, bridge or building timber, he also occu- 
pies large grounds adjacent to the mills on 
which he carries a full stock of lumber, lath 
shingles, etc., and is i)repared to su|iply build- 
ers upon as reasonable terms as any contem- 
poraneous establishment in the state, llist'a- 
cilities for procuring supplies has insured a 
growing and prosperous trade, and his annual 
transactions will range from .f iS.ooo to $20,- 
000, handling logs and dealing in walnut, ash, 
cherry, pine and poplar lumber. Mr. Nichols 
isa native of New Haven Coimtv, Conn, where 
he was born in 1S14. Nearly half a century 
ago he came to the west, when this country 
was comparatively new, and was lormerly en- 
gaged in the boot and shoe trade at Conners- 
ville, in 1S71 he came to this place where he 
erected his present mill, and commenced his 
present business. 

GLENWOOD :MILLS, 

Chas. H. Alger, Propr. 
The Glenwood mills were originally erected 
about S years ago by Mr. David Smith, who 
owned, and conducted them for about four 
years, when he sold to Robert Andis. He sub- 
sequently disposed of the mill to E. H. Shirk, 
of Peru, this state, of w hom Mr. Alger pur- 
chased in iSSi. For the past five years these 
mills have been in the management of experi- 
enced millers. Theo. 11. .Siegrist an experi- 
e.xperienced miller with able assistants, is 
still conducting the business, and doing 
both merchant and custom work and exchange. 
The building isa 2,'; story structure 40x40 
feet in dimensions, Desides engine room and 
shed in rear 20x40 feet in size. Three run 
of stone are used and the improvments em- 
brace the new process purifier, insuring the 



production of the highest grade of flour pLaced 
upon home or foreign markets. The motive 
power of these mills is supplied by a 40 horse 
power engine and boiler, and three brands of 
tlour are here produced. X'r/.: "Favorite," 
"Paient Flour" and "Straight Grade," while 
the products of the Glenwood Mills stand so 
high as to reflect credit alike upon Ihe mills 
and upon the section of the country in which 
thev are conducled. Mr.Chas. H.Alger, the 
present owner and operator of these mills, is a 
native of this county and state, and has been 
chieflv engaged in agricultural pursuits, and 
identitied with the business interests of this 
section since childhood. lie still owns and op- 
erates a tine larm of 13S acres near this place, 
which is in a high stale of cnlti\ ation, and also 
owns two residences in this place, where he is 
recognized as among the most enterprising ot 
our public spirited citizens of this county and 
state. 

MURPHY i; GAVIN, 

Dry Goods and Notions, Groceries, 
Hardware, IJooi s and Shoes, Hats 
and Caps and Grain. 
The house of Messrs. Murphy •.V Gavin is 
justlv entitled to liberal consideration on ac- 
count of the imjiorlant leading position it has 
attained in this section of the state, and also 
for the aggregate amount of it;, annual trans- 
actions. The present firm dates its origin as 
recently as Nov. 1SS2, and occupies a general 
bufiness room 23x30 feet in dimensions, in 
which is carried a full stock of Foreign and 
American dry goods, notions and fancy goods 
selected with direct relcrence to the require- 
ments of the trade of Fayette and Rush coun- 
ties. They also carry a choice stock of gro- 
ceries and provisions, canned and pickled 
goods, tobaccos, cigars, notions, etc., besides 
hardware, embracing farmer's and mechanic's 
tools, table and pocket cutlery, builders and 
house-keepers goods, and a well selected stock 
of the best makes and grades of bouts and 
shoes tor men, women, boys, misses and child- 
ren. This house also occupies an additional 
room 35x35 feet in dimension, used as gererat 
ware house and storage room, and deal exten- 
sively in grain for which they pay the highest 
market price. The aggregated transactions ot" 
this tirm will range between $50,000 and $60,. 
000 annually, and while occupying the leading 
position in commercial circles in this section 
of the two counties, their business transactions 
will bear favorable comparison with the lead- 
ing commercial houses of either of the county 
seats. Mr. Jesse Murphy, the senior member 
of this firm is a native 'of Fayette County 
where he was born in 1S36. Hi's lather, Jesse 
Murphv,Sr. was one of the early setlers.coining 
to this'place Sept. 24, 1S49, at'which time he 
purchased the land now owned and controlled 
bv Mr. Jesse Murphy, Jr. embracing 160 
acres when there was but three acres cleared. 
This farm may now be classed as one of the 
finest farms of the state, with its nudulating 
I surface, rich aluvial soil finely watered, an^- 



90 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



its buildings and equipments placed in the 
hi^^htst state or pioductivene-^s. VVitliin the 
•past few years Mr.Mvirphv erected his present 
■fine private resilience which in it> proportions 
and architectural desit;n, as well as the hijjh 
-and handsome plateau which it adorns.places it 
amonfj the most aitrnctive private residences 
•of the state. Chietly devoted to agricultural 
pursuits and stock raising, previous to entering 
into his present business relation^, Mr. .Murphv 
has been identified with the growth, develop- 
tnent and commercial interests ot this com- 
munity' since childhood. Mr. James Gavin, 
"the present junior member of this fiini, is a 
native of Fnmklin County, this state, where 
lie was born in iS,9. Ile'came lo this ph>ce 
in 1S67, where after completing his earlv edu- 
cation he became associated with commercial 
pursuits, and has for the past ten years been 
engaged in this department of trade". 

M. ANDREWS, Wagon M.\ker ; JONA- 
THAN BANKS, Blaiks.mitii. 

These two branches of industry are conduct- 
•«d in the same building by the above named 
gentlemen. The blacksmith dejiartment con- 
ducted by Mr. Banks, dates its origin to over 
eight ye.irsau'o, and about seven \ cars of which 
the business has been carried on in the build- 
ing now occu]Med, which is 22x^2 feet in size 
and two stories high, he operations embrace 
the ironing of wagons, carriages or buggies. 
horse-shoeing, and all general job work and 
repairing pertaining to this d.partment of in- 
<iustry. Mr. Banks is a native of Favelte Co., 
this state, where he was born in 1S41. Mr. 
Andrews, who conducts the wood work depart- 
ment is prepared to do all work pertaining to 
this branch in the best manner and at reasona 
ble rates, guaranteeing good work and stock. 
He has for the past seven years been associa- 
ted with this branch of business in this place, 
about fouryear^ of which he has had his shop 
in the present building. He was born in Rip- 
ley County in this state in 1S36, where he was 
raised and learned his trade, coming to this 
place in 1S77. While he may not be able to 
draw a pension for his association with the ar- 
my during the rebellion he is none the less 
worthy to receive such. During the war he 
started to enlist and join the Union forces at 
Pittsburg landing, and while on the boat, be- 
fore formally enli-ting, was shot iti the leg and 
lliercby disabled for service. After recovering 
he was for a time employed in the coach de- 
partment of the O. .V M' Ry., and for a time 
at the Ohio Falls car works, prior to coming 
<to tliis place. 



E. ELWELL, 

Manvfacturilk of Light and Heavy 

HaRNRSS ANn (iKNF.RAL ReI'AIKING. 

Mr. Elwell started in his present business 
here about live years ago, and while he does 
not make any pretentions to carrying in stock 
ready made work, he is prepared to p\it up to 
order, anything in the line required by his pa- 
trons, guaranteeing good slock and workman- 
shiji. His special attention is devoted to the 
prompt and elTicient repairing belonging to 
this department, in which he enjoys a liberal 
patronage from adjacent territory'. Mr. El- 
well is a native of Franklin County in this 
state, in which he was born in 1840. His earlv 
life was spent upon the larm and during tli'e 
great civil war he participated in many of the 
most noted battles and skirmishes of the later 
years of the war. In iiiC,.\ he enlisted in Co. 
K. iJ3d Reg. Ind. Vol. Inf, serving \mder 
Gen'Is. Burnside and others. He participated 
in the battles of "Buzzard Roost," Rasaccaand 
the battles and skirmishes of the Georgia 
Catnpaign, at Nashville, and at Kingston, N. 
C, receiving an honorable discharge at Lex- 
ington, N. C., Sept. 1S65, at the close of the 
war. He then returned to the farm ami was 
for some years engaged in agricultural pursuits 
but subsequently learned the trade of harness 
maker and removed to this place at the time 
of starting his business as above stated. 

WM. HOLDEN, 

Barber and Hair Dresser. 
As a skilled and experienced tonsorial artist 
Mr. Holden enjoys a reputation which will 
compare favorably with the boasted excellence 
of tho-e of more pretensions towns or cities. 
His shop was erected by himself expressly to 
meet the requireinents of patrons, and since 
coming here about iS months aijo he has tbund 
a liberal and growing business in this depart- 
ment. Mr. Holden' is a native of Hamilton 
County, Ohio, where he was born in iS<^^. 
He commenced this business at Colter's Cor- 
ners, Ind., afterwards going to College Cor- 
ners, End., where he started on his own account. 
After visiting other places he decided to settle 
here, which he did at the time above noted, 
and being the only shop in the place he linds 
a fair share of palronaire I'rom both citizens of 
town and country, giving the fullest satisfac- 
tion in best styles of hair cuts and easy shav- 
ing. 



There are also doing business here the fol- 
lowing firms: James Mitchell, drain tile; H. 
Messersmith, drugs; Thos. Ochiltree, planing 
mill; J. M. Reed, blacksmith. 



- ■ .> 

■ 7' ■ 






MILROY. 



This now enterprising village was orig- 
inally hud out in 1880 by Nathan Tomp- 
kins and Nathan Julian. Among tlic 
old settlers of this section we mention 
John Zininicrinuu, Seneca Smith, Henry 
Henderson, Hugli Smith and the proprie- 
tors of tlie town. The iirst tavern was 
kept by Hugh Smith. Tiie first store by 
N. Julian and the next by Seneca Smith. 
The first physician vas Dr- Sharp. The 
first blacksmith was A. Snyder, the next 
Samuel McGiiinis. The first steam mill 
■was conducted by ]Mount it Power. The 
fir.-t church (Methodistj was built in 1834. 
The first school was by N. Tompkins. 
Eliza Bartlett kept the first one in town. 
The building known as the Athenium 
near here, was used for school and church 
purposes as early as 18o0. The first 
house built in tlie town was by the pro- 
prietors Tompkins and Julian. This 
place has lieen an important trading 



center for many years, but with the com- 
pletion of the Vernon, Hreensburg & 
Rushville Railroad through this j)lace in 
1881 a new imjietus was given to its com- 
mercial activities. It is now an import- 
ant grain center. Mr. H. H. Elston is 
the express, freight and ticket agent and 
telegraph operator. .Mr. John Zimmer- 
man and wife are now the only persons 
living who were here in ISo-^. The place 
now contains a population of about 400 
inhabitants, three churches, Methodist, 
Presbyterian and Cliristian, two hotels 
and two pliysiciaiis. It also has a graded 
school, and a lodge of F. cfe A. M. To 
get a more comprehensive idea of the 
importance of the place as a trade center, 
the reader should give careful attention 
to the scries of descriptive articles of the 
leading houses which foHows, as from this 
source can be obtained a class of inform- 
ation to be had in no other wav. 



ED. INNIS, 

Drugs, Books, Stationkuv, Etc. 
Success in anv dejiarlment of business, and 
more especially in tiiat which is devoted to llie 
sale of drugs, medicines, chemicals, books and 
their appropriately associated commodities, de- 
pends to a very great extent upon that intelli- 
gent proficiency which involves a tliorough 
pr.ictical comprehension of even the minute 
-details embraced therein. To the possession 
■of these indispensable traits, and to the enter- 
prise and ability shown by Mr. Ed. Innis in 
the management of his now e.xtensive busi- 
ness, may be directly traced the gratifying 
increase in his annual transactions since the 
inauguration of his present successful enter- 
prise in May, 1S7S, when upon a comparativ ely 
small scale, he established the pharmacy and 
book and stationery house now doing an an- 
nual business of more th.-in $15,000. Mr. 
Innis occupies, for sales and storage purposes, 
one tloor 24x58 feet in dimensions, ^vlth an I. 
17x38 feet, where he carries a carefully selected 



line of unadulterated drugs and chetnicals, 
paints, oils, varnishes, the standard proprietary 
medicines and remedial agentsofthe day, toilet 
articles and perfumeries, notions, school and 
miscellaneous books and stationery, periodicals 
and school supplies, notions, queens and glass- 
ware, and a great variety of miscellaneous 
merchandise pertaining to these special 
branches of trade. In thi' prescription depart- 
ment the greatest care i- t xt-rcis-ed in tlie 
preparation of physicians' presci ijilions, family 
recipes, and pharmaceutical compounds trom 
the purest and best ingredients, and in each 
department of the salesroom the stock is full, 
complete and comprehensive. Mr. Innis is a 
native of this state and was born in 1S53. Prior 
to embarking in his present business, he was 
engasjed in agricultural pursuits, and has, by 
his own unaided efVorls, studious habits, and 
honorable methods ot dealing, become an effi- 
cient pharmacist and successful merchant, 
with a trade which will compare favorably 
with that of any contemporaneous establish- 



92 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



merit in this line in Rush County or in East- 
ern Indiana. 

T. M. AMOS, 

Restalr.xnt and Grocfry. 
The popular restaurant, ovs^crand icecream 
parlors and i^rocerv house now con iucted bv 
Mr. T. M. ,\nios in Miirov, \va~ oriyin.illv es- 
tablished bv Mr. Jolin M. Berrv, who conduct- 
ed the business lor several \e:ir-, di-po^i; ;.; of 
his interest to tin- present enterprisini^ propri- 
etor in Sept. iSi)3. In the sales department 
■will be tbund an adnnrablv selected slock ot" 
staple and I'ancv groceries, canned -^oods, for- 
eign and domestic fruits and nuts, tine coiifec- 
tionerv, ci;^ar<, tobacco and notions, while in 
the restaurant which is fitted up in a neat and 
attractive manner with scatinj; capacity for 
about thirty guest-., first-class nieal>and lunch- 
es are served at .ill hours and oysters in every 
style, and ice cream in their appr.'priatc se;i- 
sons. The premises occupied are iSxf'O feet 
in dimensions and Ihe stock carried is lull and 
complete in every department. This is the 
onlv establishment of its class in Milrov, and 
its patrona:,'e is derived not only from our own 
citizens but t'rom strangers visiiini; the city 
%vho will always find the choicest delicacies of 
the season served in first-class style at po]nilar 
prices. Mr. Amos is a native of this county 
and state and was born in 1843. Prior to em- 
barking in his present line he was eii^aged in 
agricultural pursuits in this coulny, where he 
enjoys a wide and inlluential circle ofacipiain- 
tances. Genial, polite and nttentive to his pa- 
trons Mr. Amos has established a large and 
growing trade and is deservedly [i./pular 
throughout this entire section. 

MILROY MILLS, 

MOSF.S Co.NRAIi, PnoPR 

■ For lully hall a century the old Milroy Mills 
located on Flat Rock Creek, have been a fa- 
miliar land mark to the re-idents of this sec- 
tion of Rush County, and a great convenience 
to the tarmers of this vicinity who have during 
this period relied on these mills for the conver- 
sion of the cereal products of their fertile fields 
into flour and meal for iheir own sustenance 
land feed for their stock. The original mills 
which were erected in 1835 by Mr. Thomas J. 
Laramore have since passed through several 
hands, the order of their sviccession being as 
follows: Rice ,.V Bracken: Bracken: Frank 
Swan;Mo^es Conrad the present proprietor 
who sold the projierty in 1875 to Win. Tree 
and re-purchased it in iSi't, at which time ex- 
tensive additions were made and niunerous 
improvements introduced. The present build- 
ing is a 2/2 story structure 24x45 feet in di- 
mensions, containing two run of stones, the 
motive Ibrce lor which is supplied by one 15 
horse power engine and boiler, and an overshot 
water-wheel propelled by the waters of Flat 
Rock Creek. The work performed is princi- 
pally custom milling, the daily capacity of the 
mills ranging I'rom 75 to ico bushels of grain, 
and the patronage is mainly derived trom this 



and adioiniiig towns. Mr. Moses Conrad is a 
native of Fleming County. Ky., where he was 
born in 1823. He is a ihoroui;hlv pra.tical 
miller and learnt-d the trade at Fleminsburgh, 
Kv., as early as 1S46. lie first conducted a 
mill 011 his own account at Homer in this 
County in 1867, where he remained until the 
mill wasdestro\ed by fire in 1870. He has. 
been lor nearly twenty year~ permanently 
icKntified with the milling interests in this im- 
mediate neighborho'id where he is well and 
favorably known as a reliable fir<t class miller 
and a puljlic spirited citizen of unimpeachable 
integrity and honor. 

ROBERT DORSTF, 

GlCNERAL Mi:RCII.\Nni.SE 

As the leading mercantile establishment of 
IVIilroy, the palm should unquestionably be 
awarded to the popular gvneial ^tore of Mr. 
Robeit Dorste, located on the corner of Main 
and PiilsbiM'v .Sts. Mr. Uorste commenced 
busi:iess in this town in 1S70 upon a compara- 
tively small scale, and removed to his present 
commodious quarters in 1S81, where he occu- 
pies a two-story building Jox66 feet in dimen- 
sions. His stock is one of the most complete 
and comprehensive to be found at any similar 
eslal.li-lunrnt in tliis section, embracing a 
general line of miscellamous merchandise, in- 
cluding foreign and American dry goods, dress 
faiirics. doine-tics, white gnod^, woolens, laces, 
trimmings, notions, men's, boys' and chil- 
dren's ready-made clothing and furnishing 
goods, hats, ciips, boot>, shoes, staple and fancy 
laniily groceries and piovisions, cigars, tobac- 
co, confectionery, fruits, queensand glassware, 
and a great v.iriety of articles too numerous to 
particularize in the limits of the present sketch. 
The Milroy post olfice is located in this build- 
ing, Mr. Dorste having been commissioned 
po-t-master in 1874, during the administration 
of President Grant, and has filled that respon- 
sible por-itinn since. The trade of this repre- 
sentative house is derived from a wide area of 
contiguous territory, and the annual transac- 
tions range from $;o,ooo to $25,000. Mr. 
Dorste who is one of our most enterprising 
and energetic merchants and public-spirited 
citizens, is a native of .Saxony, Germany, 
where he was born in 1S47. He came to the 
United States in 1S56, landing at New Or- 
leans, and came to Milroy in 1S65. During 
our civil war, although but a bov of fifteen, he 
entered the service of his adopted country, 
enlisting as a private soldier in the fall of 1S61 
as a member of Co. K, 43d Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, and with that command went to the 
front, being assigned to the Army of Tennes- 
see. At the memorable battle of Pittsburgh 
Landing. -Mr. Dorste was so severely wounded 
as to incapacitate him for active service. He 
was subsequently placed on duty m Ihe hospi- 
tal department, where he remained until 1863, 
when he received an honorable discharge on 
account of di>ability occasioned by his wounds. 
Shortly after his return to civil life he became 
a resident ol this place. In addition to the: 



office of po<;t- master, he has held the position 
of school trustee tor two vears, and ha^^ ever 
■evinced a deep interest in ail m^itter^ pertain- 
ing to the educational, commercial and social 
advanciment of the communitv, and the 
development of its natural and acquired 
advantages and resources. 

J. F. SMITH, 

Groceries and Provisions. 
One of the leading grocery and provision 
houses of Rush Countv, with a trade aggre- 
gating more than $10,000 per annum, and 
steadily increasing, is located at Milrov, and 
conducted hy that en'erprisinii merchant, and 
well known citizen. Mr. J. F. Smith, who es- 
tablished the present house in iSS:;. The 
premises occupied comprise two floors and 
basement of a commodious, substantial, and 
centrally located brick business structure 
20\6o feet in dimensions, and the slock carried 
embraces complete and desirable lines of the 
choicest varieties of staple and I'ancv family 
groceries, teas, colfecs, spices, sugars, svrups, 
soaps, foreign and domestic fruits, canned 
goods, provisions, farm and dairy produce, 
queens and glassware, cigars, manufactured 
tobacco, conlectionery, notions and grocers' 
sundries generally, selected by Mr. Smith with 
an express view to the requirements of the 
better class of trade in Milrov and adioining 
towns. The stock is lull and complete in every 
department and no old good, are allowed to 
accumulate on his shelves and counters, abso- 
lute purity and freshne-s being a desideratum 
aimed at in ihe selection of stock. Mr. Smith 
is a native of Bourbon Countv. Kentucky, and 
was born in iS:6. He tir-t entered mercantile 
life in the capacity of clerk for Mr. John L. 
Robinson in this countv in 1S46. and after- 
vv-ards was employed as salesman in the estab- 
lishment of Mr. Joseph Hamilton m this citv. 
He was subsequently engaged by other parties 
in Shelbvville, and in i^^z' embarked in busi- 
ness here with Dr. Wm. Bracken, then a resi- 
dent of this place. He was elected treasurer 
of Kush County in 1856. and re-elected in 
1S5S, his second term expiring in 1S61 : after 
which he again resumed business here, and 
has been identified with the mercantile pur- 
suits and commercial interests of Milrov since 
that time. Establishing his present successful 
business enterprise as above noted, in the 
prosecution of which he has met with a most 



93 



gratifying degree of success and financial en- 
couragement. 



WILLIAM BELL, 
Blacks.mith. 
The general blacksmith and wagon shop of 
Mr. William Bell, was established by Mr. Wil- 
liam Richmond, tiie present proprietor taking' 
possession in 1S54. The shop which is 15x30 
feet in dimensions is located in the rear of Blair 
& McKee's Hardware House, and is thorough- 
ly equipped with all the requisite appliances 
tor tlie successful prosecution of the business 
in all its branchirs. Special attention is devo- 
ted to horse-shoeing upon scientific principles 
with reference to the proper treatment and 
preservation of the hoofs, and to ironing wag- 
ons, carriages, buggies, carts, etc. A promi- 
nent feature of the business is m.ade of repair- 
ing vehicles of every description, agricultural 
implements and machinery and to general job- 
bing. Wm. Bell, who is a native of Franklin 
Co. Ind., was born in 1S3S. He is a prac- 
tical and experienced workman, and learned 
the trade in Metamora, Franklin Co. Durin" 
the war of the rebellion, Mr. Bell was among 
the first to volunteer in defense of the old flag 
enlisting in iif)i as a member of Co. C. 13th 
Indiana \'oiunteer Infantry, which rendered 
most effective and valuable aid to the union 
cause in the Eastern Army. He was with 
General Butler during his 'memorable cam- 
paigns on the James River, and participated 
in many of Ihe most eventful engagements of 
the war, among which were the closing battles 
around Petersburg and Richmond, which cul- 
minated in the discomfiture of Lee's Army, 
the occupation of the Confederate Capital and 
the surrender at Appomattox. .\t"ter the 
grand review of the victorious L'nion Armv 
at Washington, D. C. he was honorably dis- 
charged I'rom service with a lour years record 
of which he may well feel proud.' 

Among other firms doing business here the 
principal ones are as follows: A. K. Smith, 
saw mi:i; J. W. Thurston, harness; X. E. 
Tompkins, hotel; R. Weilman, meat market; 
S. H. Bosley, wagon maker; W. W. Barton, 
drugs; Blair & McKee, hardware; Moorman 
& Mostcr, boots and shoes; S. Pink, general 
merchandise; C. B. Rilev, grain; J. R. Davis, 
hotel; J. C. Barton, general merchandise; S. 
R. Smith, blacksmith. 



HOMER. 



In seeking for the more direct cause of 
the rapid growth and increasing prosjier- 
ity of tliis part of the state, the reader 
will plainly see that the numerous rail- 
roads crossing the state in every direction 
have been mainly instnuiiental in hring- 
ing about this result. This portiim of the 
state on account of its great fertility, may 
be considered the garden spot of Indiana, 
consequently it lias been rajiidly settled 
U]) and a demand necessarily created for 
numerous thriving trading points. "We 
will take for instance the brief history of 
the village of Huiucr. This place dates 
its origin from the ccmipletion of the Jef- 
fersonville, Madison and Indianapolis 
Railroad which was completed in ISoO. 
Previous to that time Nathan Murphy 
and Samuel Craig erected a saw mill liere 
to assist in getting out material for the 
construction of the road. A few rude 
houses were erected for the use of the 
employees, these houses being built of 
upright slabs which came from the mill. 



From this the name of Slabtown was 
given the place, whicli name it bore for 
some time. The first merchant of any 
note was Jethro Folger who kept a small 
store and sold general merchandise. The 
next was Benjamin Wyman who carried 
on a small trade in general merchandise. 
In 1868 William Odell started a wagon 
shop. Jesse Jarrett was the first black- 
smith. I^aac II. Goss was the first i)ost- 
master. At the present time there is 
very fair church and school buildings, a 
lodge of Odd Fellows, while the Adams 
Express Company and "Western Union 
Telegraph Company both have ofHees 
here. There arc a number of business 
houses here which will compare very fa- 
vorably ill amount of stock carried and 
business transacted, with any other place 
of its size in the county. The village has 
a population of about 2fl0 inhabitants 
and is located eight miles west of the 
county seat with which it is connccted 
by railroad. 



J. T. ROnKRTSuN .V SOX, 
General Mhkchandise. 
The historv of tlie old established mercantile 
house of J. T. Robertson iV Son is so intimate- 
ly associated with the history of tliis town, 
that they are in many respects identical. Estab- 
lished more than tiiirty years atjo at which 
time it was the only house of its class in Ho- 
mer, it has grown with the growtli and pros- 
pered with the prosperity of our progressive 
and thriving town. The founder and original 
proprietor was Mr. James Emmons, and the 
subsequent changes are given below in the or- 
der of succession in which they transpired, the 
exact dates not being available at the present 
time. W. T. Emmons; Henry Pickerell and 
James Inlow, next Henry Pickerel! and J. T. 
Robertson, followed by J. T. Robertson alone, 
next W. L. Kenner, then Robt. Power follow- 
ed by John Bainbridge, then J. T. Robertson 



and J. H. Thomas, next J. T. Robertson and 
H. S. Steele who was succeeded in 1&7S bv 
Mr. J. T. Robertson alone, the present part- 
nersliip being formed in 1S7S. The stock car- 
ried by this representative house comprises a 
general line of miscellaneous merchandise, in- 
cluding Foreign and American drv goods, no- 
tions, ready made clothing, furnishing goods,, 
hats, caps, boots, shoes, h.irdware, staple and 
fancy family groceries, produce, provision.s, etc. 
Mr. J. T. Robertson the senior member of the- 
present firm is a native of the State of Ken- 
tucky where he was born in 1S30. lie has been 
a resident of Indiana lor the past thirty vears, 
during the greater portion of which lin'ie he 
has been prominenlly identified with the com- 
mercial interests of this section. He was ap- 
pointed Post Master in 1S73 under the second 
administration of President Grant, and has oc- 
cupied that position since tO' tlie general accept- 



HOMER. 



95 



ance of our citizens irrespective of party affil- 
iations. His son and business associate Mr. 
W. F. Robertson was born in Indiana in 1S56. 

M. C. IN LOW, 

Dealer in Drugs, Fancy Articles, 

ETC. 
Mr. Inlow was born in Rush County, Sept. 
17, 1S41. }^is boybood days were passed on 
his I'atlier's farm, where he rendered as^ibtance 
until the completion of his education, which 
required his sole attention. Alter tinishing 
his education he entered the school room as 
teacher and instructor, in which capacity he 
remained for two years. In April, 1S76, rec- 
ognizing tlie necessity of a drug store at Ho- 
nier.he established his present enterpri.se,which 
is the only one of the kind in the place, the 
nearest oiie being at Manilla, this County, some 
three miles distant. Tlie stock carried is c|viite 
extensive for a location of this nntiu-c, embra- 
cing drugs, pro|irietary medicines, toilet arti- 
cles, and those goods so essential to the farming 
community. Sir. Inlow gives special atten- 
tion to the compounding of physiiiau's |)re- 
scriptions and in epai ation of I'amily recipes, the 
annual cransaetiiins in these departments ag- 
gregating no small amount. Isham Inlow, 
father ot'the subject ol Ihissketcli.isone of tlie 
oldest and most honored pioneers in this sec- 
tion of the state, having been one of th.' first 
settlers 01 the county. He was born in Flem- 
ing Countv, Ky., but came here more than a 
half a centiu-y ago. Mr. Michael Cas-idy. di- 
rect ancestor of Mr. Inlow, was one of the tirst 
settlers of Fleming Count\ , Ky. He was a 
companion of Daniel lioone, and surveyed 
Flenn'ng and Mason Coun'ies. He served 
thirty years in the Kentucky Legislature and 
was one of the most noted men of his day. 

N. ARBUCKEL, 
Drain Tile. 
For the past few years the subject of under- 
drainnge of the soil by tlie use of tile is attract- 
ing uni>ersal altent'on and coming into gener- 
al use wherever the merits of the s\-stem have 
been properly presented. As a consequence 
the manufacture of drain tile has become an 
important industrv.and in Rush County ninny 
individuals and firms are engaged in this 
special branch ot trade, prominent among 
■whom may be mentioned Mr. N. Arbuckel's 
extensive works located at Homer. Mr. 
Arbuckel is owner of a fine farm of 70 acres 
upon which these works are located, a portion 
of whicli contains an excellent deposit of clay 
admirablv adapted to the requirenicnte of his 
business and from which his supplies are de- 
rived. These works were established in 1S72 
upon a comparatively small scale, and each 
year has witnessed a steady increase in the prod- 
ucts and demand until at the present time he 
turns out annually more than 150,000 feet and 
with extensive improvements recently intro- 
duced the works have a capacity for manutac- 
turing 300,000 feet. Mr. Arbuckel manufac- 
tures the following sizes, 3, 3>i, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 



and 10 inch tile, his kiln.s, two in number,have 
a capacity of 10,000 feet each and his drving 
sheds of So,ooo feet. He emplovs during the 
season five assistants and one ;6 horse power 
engine and boiler furnishes the motive force 
required. His sales at the present, time are 
principally local but with the steadily increas- 
ingdemaiul, and the interest manil'ested in the 
subject of drainage in other sections of the 
state the scope of his operations is constantly- 
extending to more remote districts. Mr. Ar- 
buckel is a native of Rush County and was 
born in iS44. He has devoted considerble at- 
tention to the perfection of drain tiles, the 
most approved and economical process of man- 
ufacture, the selection of the best material and 
as a consequence the tile produced by hitn is- 
of a superior quality. 



JACOB W. WEB.STER, I 

General Merchandise. 
Although a resident of this lownship for 
more than a third of a century and one of our 
oldest, most widcU' known and highly respect- 
ed citizens Mr. Jacob \V, Webster is the Latest 
aspirant to public tavor in a commercial point 
of view, having in January 1S.S4 opened his 
present establishment for general merchandi- 
zing. His sales room is filled with an exten- 
sive and complete stock of new and desirable 
goods including full lines of Foreign and Amer- 
ican dry goods, ready made clothing, furnish- 
ing goods, notions, boots, shoes, liats,caps, st.a- 
ple and fancy groceries, teas, colfees, spices 
sugars, soajis, canned goods, cigars, tobacco 
fruits, hardware and miscellaneous articles too 
numerous to particularize, such as are usually 
used in a first-class est ihlishment of this de- 
scription, which he is enabled to otier to the 
residents of Homer and adjoining towns at 
prices which will defy successful competition 
even in the large cities. The stock which is 
full and comprehensive in every department 
has been selected with great care expresslv to 
meet the requirements of the trade in this sec- 
tion, and a critical examination of goods and 
prices is solicited by the enterprising proprie- 
tor. Mr. Webster is a native of the State of 
Kentucky but has been a resident of Indiana 
since 1S50 and of Walker township for the 
past thirty three years. He is at the present 
time serving his second term as Tovvnship 
Trustee, and has for many years evinced deep 
interest in the prosperity and advancement of 
our local interests. 

HENRV SKLOWER, 

General MFRCiiANnisE. 
It is believed that, in proportion to its size, 
the town of Homer will not tall beliind its 
neighbors in the aggregate amount of its grain 
business, the most reliaiile information attaina- 
ble showring that the merchants and dealers 
here ship to other points not less than 40,000 
bushels annuallv, and of this amount more 
than 30,000 bushels pass through the hands of 
Mr. Henry H. Sklower, one of the largest op- 
erators in this section. Mr. Sklower also 



96 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



makes a prominent feature of the wool trade, 
buying and shipping annually of tliis import- 
ant commodity about S.ooo pounds. In con- 
nection with the above named branches of 
trade, Mr. Sklower conducts a general store, 
one of the most extensive and completely 
stocked in this section, carrying full and coin- 
plete lines ot foreign and American dry goods, 
notions, ready-made clothing. furnishing 
goods, hats, caps, boots, shoes, hardware, sta- 
ple and fancy groceries, and miscellaneous 
merchandise in great variety. He makes a 
prominent specialty of buying and selling all 
kinds of farm and dairy produce;and is always 
prepared to pay in cash or merchandise at cash 
prices, the highest ruling rates. He occupies 
as general salesroom for his large stock, a 
commodious building 40x60 feet in dimensions, 
and for the storage of grain two \varehouses, 



with an aggregate storage capacity of 30,000 
bushels. His trade is principally local, or 
within a radius of twenty miles, with the ex- 
ception of his grain, wool and produce, which 
he ships in large quantities to the trade cen- 
tres of the East. Mv. Sklomer is a native of 
Prussia, but has been for nearly a quarter of a 
cenlury a resident of Indiana. He embarked 
in his present enterprise in this town in 1S76, 
at which time he succeeded to the business 
which had been established four years previ- 
ously by Mr. Uriah Thomas. Bv strict atten- 
tion to his business, the exerciseof energy and 
enlerprise in its prosecution, a uniformly hon- 
orable method of dealing with his patrons, he 
has established a steady and permanent trade. 



William Odell and J. M. Anderson also 
carry on the blacksniithing business here. 




FALMOUTH, 



Following a brief account of the inci- 
dents which lead to the organization of 
the county of Rush, it becomes essential 
• to notice to some extent tlie incipient 
stages and subsequent development of 
trade interests of the smaller and yet 
flourishing towns, wlucli have for a num- 
ber of years held a conspicuous position 
iu the business interests of this and ad- 
joining counties. 

Among the oldest settlers in this sec- 
tion may be mentioned Joseph Piper, who 
came here in 182."), also John, David and 
Daniel Baker, who came from Kentucky. 

This town was originally laid out iu 
1824, l)ut some ten years later was replat- 
ted. The first store was kept by David 
Drummond, about the time of the laying 
out of the place iu 1834. The building 
was of primitive construction, 8x10 feet 
in dimensions, and the counter was made 



by placing au old door upon two barrels. 
The first physician in this section was Dr. 
Cliil'ord. Wagon shops, blacksmitli shops 
and other associated interests shortly aft- 
er gave to this place some prominence, 
but the introduction of railroads to other 
sections of the county and tlie division of 
interests, for many years kept tlie town 
from attaining much significance. The . 
touching at this j)oint of the Jefferson- 
ville, ]\Iadison and lndianaj)olis Railway, 
in conjunction with a fine pike passing 
througli the town, and the magnificent 
agricultural districts which surround it, 
seem of late years to have given to it a 
new impetus and greater importance as 
a trade center. Of course, these results 
are largely due to the enterprising char- 
acter of its business men whom we have 
noticed at some length editorially, to 
which the reader is referred. 



OVERHISER \- DAWSOX, 
Saw and Planing Mills. 
As a representative firm engaged in this 
important branch of business, none are worthy 
of more favorable consiiicr.ition than that of 
Overliiser & Dawson, whose yards, saw and 
planing mills are located in the progressive 
and thriving vi!laL;e of Falmouth, where a 
ground space of one and one-third acres is 
occupied lor the various departments of their 
business. Upon this plant is erected a com- 
modious and conveniently arranged mill 
building 50.N50 feet in dimensions, equipped 
■with improved devices for manufacturmg and 
finishing lumber for the trade and for building 
purposes. These mills turn out annually an 
average of 1,000,000 feet of the various kinds 
of lumber, and have the amplest facilities for 
planing, tongueing. grooving, mortising, scroll 
work, etc. They make a specialty of manu- 
facturing window and door trames, and all 
varieties of builders' supplies. The members 
of the tirm, who are thoroughly practical me- 
chanics, are prepared to furnish designs and 
fipecifications for any description of public or 



private buildings, churches, school houses, 
business blocks or residences, and as contrac- 
tors and builders, to furnish e^limates and 
contract for the erection of the same upon the 
most reasonable terms. Th'»y are extensive 
dealers in walnut, oak, cherry, ash, and other 
hardwood lumber, which they ship in large 
lots to eastern dealers and innnufacturers, as 
well as in the common varieties required for 
local consumption. Mr. M.nrion Overliiser is 
a native of Hancock Covmty. Indiana, where 
he was born in 1S43, and is a pr.Tctical and 
experienced carpenter and builder. In 1.S62 he 
entered the service of his country as a member 
of tlie gallant 17th Indiana Battery, which was 
assigned to the department of the East, under 
General Emerv and other commanders, and 
with that organization particijiated in many of 
the most memorable campaigns, engagements 
and skirmishes of the war of the rebellion, in- 
cluding the battles of Winchester, Opequan 
and Cedar Creek, and numerous others of 
minor importance, receiving an honorable dis- 
charge at the termination of hostilities, July S, 
1S65. Mr. P. H.- Dawson is a native of Fay- 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



ette Countv, this state, and was born In 1S39. 
He has been en<(agcd in tliis department of 
industry since attaining hiis majority. 

SIMON JOSEPH, 

General MERCinxnisE. 
Illustrative of wliat may be accomplished by 
energy, industry, and well-directed ttVort 
under our free American Institutions, may be 
cited the career of Mr. Simon Jo^eph, now one 
of the representative successful merchants of 
Fayette County, who is a native ofSakey, 
Russia, where he was born in 1S40. He came 
to America in 1S65. landing at New York 
■with a capital of twenty-five cents, and going 
first to Cincinnati, where he resided for a sliort 
time. He then came to Rushville, previous 
to his removal to Falmouth. Determined to 
win an honest livelihood, and with an ambition 
to become a merchant on his own account, 
he engaged in peddling tlirou;,'h Rush and 
Favette counties and accumulated some means 
with which, in 1S79, he embarked in mercan- 
tile life in Falmouth, establishing on a com- 
paratively small scale, the hou-e which has 
since attained considerable prominence uniler 
his energetic and efficient man.ngement. He 
now owns the building in which his salesroom 
and residence is located, being a fine two-story 
structure 28x5.; feet in si-^e, with an L K'ixjS. 
That portion occupied as salesroom is 18x42 
feet in size, in which he carries at all times an 
admirably selected stock of dry goods, both 
foreign and domestic, staple and fancy gro- 
ceries, ready-made clothing, hardware, cutlery, 
boots and shoes, hats and caps, notions and 
miscellaneous merchandise in great variety. 
In addition to the special branches of trade 
above enumerated, Mr. Joseph is an extensive 
dealer in wool, and handles annually of this 
staple commodity not less than 40,000 or 50,- 
000 pounds, shipping to the principal cities 
and trade centres of the Union. From this 
necessarily brief sketch, it will be perceived 
that Mr. Joseph has been emphatically the 
architect of his own fortune, and from com- 
parative poverty, has, by the exercise of indus- 
try, thrift and application coupled with a 
system of fair and honorable dealing, amassed 
a handsome competency and an enviable 
reputation in the community in which he 
resides. 



DANIEL WURTH, Sr., 

Cabinet Maker and Undertaker. 

Apiary. 
As unquestionably one of the most interest- 
ing as well as one of the most important of 
Falmouth's business interests the culture of 
Bees and the production of honey for the 
market as conducted by Mr. Daniel Wurth, 
Sr. at his model apiary is awanled the prefer- 
ence and that conspicuity which its merits de- 
mand. Mr. Wurth has been identified with 
this special branch of business for ihe past 
twenty years during which time he has made 
a careful and constant study of the habits and 
peculiarities of bees, the introduction and cul- 



tivation of the finest varieties, the best stock 
and the most productive breeds of Italian and 
Hybrid, and has met with a most remarkable 
degree of success. While he raises bees and 
devotes special attention to their culture, for 
sale he makes a more prominent feature of pro- 
ducing honey for the market and the superior 
quality ol his products ensures for it a ready 
sale and a demand frequently beyond his abil- 
ity to supply. He has at the present time 120 
hives in hi^ apiary and will this season increase 
that number one half its present proportions. 
In addition to this specialty Mr. Wurth con- 
ducts a first-class furniture and cabinet shop 
and undertaking establishment. Ke is propri- 
etor of a fine hearse and is prepared at the « 
shortest notice to furnish all varieties of cnllins, 
caskets and burial cases and to undertake the 
managnient of funerals in strict accordance 
with the wishes of the friends and families of 
the deceased. Mr. Wurth is a native of Baden 
Germany where he was born in 1S17. He 
came to the United Slates in 1S52. lie has 
now been for more than a quarter of a century 
identified with the business interests of the 
town. He is ably assisted in the management 
of the di;Vcrent branches of his business by his 
son, Mr. Daniel Wurth, Junior, who is a na- 
tive of Connersville and was born in 1S57. 

"FALMOUTH >nLLS," 

OVKRllISER tV Sox. 

The conversion ot the cereal products of 
the fertile fields of Rush Countv into the mer- 
chantable commodities of fiour and feed tor 
home consumption and shipment to distant 
points constitutes one of the most important 
industries of our thriving interior towns, not 
only stimulating production by supplying a 
home market at advantageous prices but in a 
financial point of view largely increasing the 
aggregate sum total of our commercial inter- 
ests-. The well-known Falmouth Mills now 
conducted by the enterprising firm of Overhi- 
scr A; Son were erected in 1S80 by Messrs. 
OverhiserA: Dawson.the latter retiring in iSSi 
at which time the present partnership was 
formed. The mill building is a commodious 
three-story frame structure 32x40 feet in di- 
mensions and is tiioroughlv etiuijiped with the 
modern designs of flouring mill machinery, in- 
cluding three run of stones with an improved 
new process purifier and other special machin- 
ery, the motive power for which is furnished 
by one 3, horse power engine and boiler. The 
mill does both merchant and custom work and 
has a daily capacity for turning out 50 barrels 
per day of clioice family fiour, the leading 
brand and one which has become deservedly 
popular with the trade as a standard of value 
and excellence being known as the "Peerless." 
This firm also manufacture and carry in stock 
all kinds of meal and mill feed and are prepar- 
ed at all times to pay the highest ruling rates 
for grain. Mr. Chas. Overhiser the senior 
member of the firm is a native of Fayette Co. 
Ind., and was born in 1S40. Prior to engaging 
in his present line of business he was identified 



FALMOUTH. 



99 



wifk agricultural jKirsuits and mtereits. His 
son and business associate Mr. Homer Overhi- 
ser was born in Fayette County, Indiana, April 
iStli, 1S65. 

A. KNOTTS, 

Drugs, Gklocicries, Etc. 
Mt. Knolts coMinienced busines^s on his own 
accG-unt in this town in 1S7;, at which time lie 
€ucoeeded the firm of Redjing & Bufkiii, in- 
fusing new life and energy into t.iie business. 
As a legitimate result, he has considerably 
increased the volume of his transactions dur- 
ing the past seven years. Iti the various 
special departments his stock is complete, 
<coniiprehensive, well assorted, and carefully 
selected with an express view to the require- 
ments of the trade in this section, and a promi- 
nent spccialtv is made of the accurate prepara- 
tion of physicians' prescriptions, family 
recipe*, and phaimaceutical compounds from 
the purest and freshest ingredients. Mr. 
Knotts is a native and life-long resident of 
Rush County, and was liorn in 1S51. His 
father was one of the pioneer settlers of this 
section, locating one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in this county about one and one-half 
miles from the present village limits, upon 
which his inotlier still resides. 

JACKSON & MEEKER, 
Black.smitjis, dec. 
With a poor hoof an otherwise valuable horse 
becomes practically worthless so that the com- 
mon saving "no hoof, no horse" is essentially 
correct. For this reason the ^uliject of horse- 
shoeing is one which should receive much at- 
tention as it is by poor shoeing by inexperien- 
ced workmen that so many liorsesare render- 
ed valueless for life. Making a prominent 
specialty of this special branch or the mechan- 
ic arts, in shoeing horses and caring for the 
hoofs on scientific principles Messrs. Jackson 
& Meeker the well known blacksmiths of Fal- 
mouth have earned an enviable reputation and 
a more than local celebrity. Tliis enterprising 
firm also devotes especial attention to carriage, 
buggv and wagon iron work, general job work 
in the blacksmithing line and repairing in all 
branches of the business. The present part- 
nership was formed January 27, 1SS4, both 
members of tlie firm liaving been previously 
engaged in business here individually. As the 
result of the consolidation their facilities liave 
been considerably increased and thev are now 
prepared to execute any description of work in 
their line with promptness and dispatch upon 
the most reasonable terms, guaranteeing work- 
manship and material in all instances. Their 
shop is 24x^0 leet in duiiensions and is equip- 
ped with all the requisite appliances for the 
successful prosecution of their business. Mr. 
Amos A. Jackson a native of Ohio was born 
in Hutler County in 1S56 and came to this 
state with his parents when quite young. He 
learned his trade at Palestine, Franklin Co. 
this state and came to Falmouth in March 1SS3. 
Mr. Menzo Meeker was born in Seneca Coun- 



ty, New York in 1S5S and learned the black- 
smith's trade at Hamsburg, Ind. He has resi- 
ded in Falmouth since 1S77 and been engaged 
in hk present business since that time. Both 
mereiibers of the tirm are practical mechanics 
and workers in iron and their trade which is 
derived from Falmouthanda wide area of adja- 
cent territory is steadily increasing. 

E. W. ELLIS, M. D., 

Physician an'd Si'RGeo.m. 
Dr. E. W. Ellis, practicing physician and 
surgeon of Falmouth, Indiana, is a native of 
Fayette County. His early life was spent in 
agricultural pursuits upon his father's farm, 
and in attendance upon the public scliools of 
his native place. His aptitude for his studies, 
and his love tor books when but a boy attract- 
ed the attention of his teachers and friends, 
and his inclinations for a professional career 
developed themselves in a marked degree. In 
1880 he commenced the studv of medicine 
with Dr. Jacob Redding, ofFahiioulh, and 
subsequently he entered the i'hyso-Medical 
College of Indianapolis, Indiana, from which 
popular institution lie graduated with honors 
in the class of i8Sj. He commenced the prac- 
tice of his profession at Conneisville, this 
state, where he remained for about six months, 
when he removed to Daleville, Delaware 
County, where he practiced successfuUv until 
September, 1883, when he established his 
present office in Falmouth. Altliough among 
the youngest practitioners in Rush Countv, he 
has already attained a prominent rank in the 
prolession, and by hi> skill, ability and ajipli- 
cation, has secured the confulence of the resi- 
dents of this community and established a 
large and lucrative local practice. 

J. H. OGLESBY, 

Dry Goons, Groceries, etc. 
This representative honse was established 
by its present proprietor in 1S75 upon a com- 
paratively small scale in the same building now 
occupied which has since been considerably 
enlarged and improved and a corresponding 
increase of trade has characterized the annual 
transactions wliich now closely approximate 
$10,000. The stock embraces a complete as- 
sortment of miscellaneous mercliandise em- 
bracing full lines of Imported and American 
dr3' goods and notions, sta|>le and fancv grocer- 
ies, ready made clothing, hats, caps, boots, 
shoes, t'urnishing goods, shelf hardware and 
cutlery, glass, queens and stone ware, confec- 
tionery, cigars, tobacco and a great variety of 
articles such as are usually found in tirst-class, 
well conducted est.ablishments of this class, 
which are otlered to the residents of Falmouth 
and vicinity at prices such as to defy success- 
ful competition. Mr. Oglesby is a native of 
Chester Co., Pennsylvania where he was born 
in iSiS. He came west when but a child with 
his parents who first settled m Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Mr. Oglesby came to this state in 1S52 and lo- 
cated at Rushville where he was actively en- 
gaged in mercantile pursuits until 1S75 when 



100 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



he came to Falmouth and established his pres- 
ent successful business. In iS!;4 he was a 
member of the town council and has served 
for several terms as a member of the school 
board in this place. He is also a member of 
the board of directors of the Rush County 
National Bank. 

DR. DAVID H. VAN NUYS, M. D., 
Physician a.nd Surgeov, 
Dr. David H. Van Nuvs, one of the most 
eminent and successful surgeons and physi- 
cians of Rush County, is a native of this state 
and was born in Switzerland County in 1S34. 
After completing his literary education, he 
commenced the studv of medicine and sur- 
gery at Columbu'i, Indiana, under the precep- 
torship, ai.d in the office of Drs. Wright & 
Davis. He subsequently graduated with high 
honors and received a diploma tVom the Jeffer- 
son Medical College of Philadelphia, Penn'a., 
and commenced the practice of his profession 
nearly a quarter of a centurv ago at Redding- 
ton, Jackson County, Indiana. He located in 
Falmouth in 1S70, and has since that lime es- 
tablished a large, lucrative and successful 
practice in this and adjoining towns. He 
stands deservedly high in the fraternity and 
enjoys in a remarkable degree the confidence 
and esteem of the community in which lie 
resides; not only in his prol'essional capacity, 
but also as an honored, patriotic and public- 
spirited citizen and member of society. He 
was appointed and commissioned postmaster 
of Falmouth during the administration of 
Gener.il Grant, and has now occupied that 
responsible position tor more than eleven 
years, to the entire acceptance of our citizens, 
irrespective of party or political preferences. 

WM. JOHNSON, 

Wagon M.vker. 

The manufacture of carriages, buggies, light 
wagons, and carriage woodwork gcnerallv, is 
a specialty in which Mr. W'm. Johnson of Fal- 
mouth is interested. He also devotes special 
attention to repairing vehicles of everv de- 
scription, agricultural implements, etc., and 
general jobbing in all departments pertaining 
to carriage wood-work. As a skilled and ex- 
pert workman in this special line he acknowl- 
edges no superior, and is prepared to guarantee 
all work performed bv him. Mr. Johnson is a 
native of the State of North Carolina, where 
he was born in 1S38. He removed from the 
old "North State" in 1S56 to Kentuckv, and in 
1S77 located at High Hill, Montgomery Coun- 



ty, Missouri, where he embarked in his present 
line of business. In iSSi he became a resident 
of Falmouth, establishing his present works, 
which, under his able and energetic manage- 
ment, have prospered. By industry, coupled 
with a uniform system of fair and honorable 
dealing, he has become fovorably known in 
business circles, and among the agricultural 
classes, from whoin his trade is principally 
derived. 



J. M. ROSS, 

Manufacturer or Drain Tile, near 

Fal.mouth. 
One of the pioneer establishments devoted 
to the manufacture of tile in this section of the 
state is that of Mr. J. M. Ross located about 
a half a mile from the village limits of Fal- 
mouth which was established about fitleen years 
ago. Mr. Ross turns out a superior qualitv of 
tile and his facilities for procuring tlie best 
quality of clay, especially adapted to this pur- 
pose are not surpassed by those of anv con- 
temporaneous establLshment in the state. His 
sales are principallv confined to Rush and ad- 
joining Counties the local demand taxing his 
resources to their utmost producing capajitv. 
Mr. Ross who is a native of this countv and 
state was horn in 1S33. Prior to engaging in 
the manufacture of tile he devoted his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits and is still largely 
interested in the cultivation of fine fruit trees 
which he sells by personal solicitation, traveling 
throughout several counties during the winter 
months taking orders for the trees raised on 
his own place. 



G. P. BECK, 

Boot and Shoe Manufacturer. 
As a manufacturer of fine and heavy custom 
boots and shoes for ladies' and gentlemen's 
wear, Mr. G. P. Beck has established in Fal- 
mouth a business which claims recognition as 
one of our local industries. He gives his per- 
sonal attention to custom work, uses only the 
best of material, and guarantees perfect fits, 
superior workmanship, moderate prices and 
complete satisfaction in all instances. Mr. 
Beck is a native of Baden, Germany, and was 
born in 1S2S. He came to the United States 
in 1848, landing at New York, Mav 2Sth, and 
proceeded directly to Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
lie was employed by Capt. John Shrum from 
1S4S until July, 1S70, when he become a resi- 
dent of Falmouth, and established, upon a 
comparatively small scale, the business in 
which he is now engaged. 



SHELBY COUNTY, 



Tliis is one of tlie central couiitius of 
Iiuliana, its iiortli-wes^t corner coming' 
within a few miles of the State Capital. 
It is bounded on tlie nortli hy Hancock 
County, on tlie east by Rush and Decatur 
ou the south by Decatur and Bartholom- 
ew and on the west by Johnson and Clar- 
ion. Its breadtli is 17 miles east and 
west and its length 24 miles nortli and 
south. It contains 408 square miles or 
201,ll.'0 acres of land. 

TOrOGP.Al'IIY AND SOIL. 

The face of tlie country is diversified, 
and this section is never in peril from the 
drouths, streams of flowing water travers- 
ing the county iu every direction. There 
are eight of these water courses within 
the county, with a total length of 140 
miles, which furnish ample drainage and 
sufficient water for agricultural purposes. 
This locality occupies an elevated posi- 
tion, being about 320 feet higher than 
Cincinnati, 100 feet higher than Indian- 
apolis and nearly 2-50 feet higher than 
Lake Michigan, being upon an elevation 
from which there is slope to the north 
and to the south. While the soil is very 
fertile, producing good crops of corn, 
wheat and grasses, there are also in tlie 
county several stone quarries from which 
are taken some of the finest stone for 
building purposes to be found in the 
Union. 

EARLY HISTORY. 

The first white man who entered this 
territory was William Connor, as early as 
1816. In October, 1818, Jacob AVhetzell 



cut a jKith through tlie woods and passed 
through the center of this county. In 
November of the same year James Wil- 
son came along this path to the point 
where it crossed the Blue River. There 
he determined to settle and erected a log 
cabin into which his family moved in 
January following. In 1JS20 this section 
was surveyed and thrown into tlie market, 
a new impulse was given to immigration, 
and in tiie same year Jas. Wilson and 
John Sleeth laid out a town site and 
named it Marion in honor of Gen. Fran- 
cis ]\Iarion. During 1821 a jietJtion to or- 
ganize a county was granted bv the Leg- 
islature, and the same was named in hon- 
or of Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky. 
In December, 1821, the Legislature ap- 
pointed commissioners for the purpose of 
locating the county seat, who choose the 
present site of tlie city of Shelby ville, on 
July 4th, 1822. The first birth was that 
of Miss Martha Kaster. The first death 
that of Samuel Butler iu the spring of 
1821. The first marriage that of Abel 
Sommers to Nancy Sleeth in May, 1822. 
As before stated, the first dwelling of auy 
kind ever erected iu the county was the 
log cabin home of James Wilson. The 
first house erected upon the site of Shel- 
byville was the home of Francis Walker. 
The first public building was tlie school- 
house erected upon the public square of 
the town of Marion as early as the autumn 
of 1821, it was built of round logs, and 
its dimensions were 16x18 feet. The first 
teacher was Jonathan Wilson who 



102 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



taught a three months school at the rate 
of 75 cents per scholar. The first court 
was convened in October, 1822; the first 
judges being Jolin Sleeth and Wni. Good- 
rich. The first election ever held took 
place in tlie forks of a tree on the public 
square, for the purjiose of selecting a Maj- 
or of tlie militia, and resulted in the clioice 
of ISIujor Ashl)el Stone. The first flour 
and saw mill in the county was built by 
John Walker in 1S22 ujxm the site now 
occui)ied by the Shelby Mills. AVilliam 
Little was the first jjost master and tlie 
rate of j)Ostage in his day was 25 cents 
])er letter. In Api-il, 1822, the county was 
divided into four townshi]is; Union, Mari- 
on, Hendricks and Xohle. Thirty years la- 
ter the present township was adoj)ted and 
tlie county j)artitione(l off into thirteen di- 
visons, namely: Jackson, Wasiungton, No- 
ble, J..iberty, Addison, Hendricks, Sugar 
Creek, lirandywine, ^Marion, Union, Han- 
over, VanBuren and Moral. The county 
possesses good railroad facilities and is 
supjilied with a well improved turnj)ike 
system, with a total of over ICO miles. 



The Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Lafay- 
ette railroad passes through the county 
from northwest to southeast; the Colum- 
bus and Rushville from south to north- 
west; the Martinsville and Cincinnati 
from Fairland .south-west; the Hamilton 
and Cincinnati through the northeastern 
corner of the county; in all overiiO miles 
of railroad. The old state road made as 
early 1821, passes through the county 
from south-east to north-west, and the 
Michigan Koad passes through in a west- 
north-west course. At the crossings of the 
principal streams fine iron bridges with 
stone abutments have been erected in a 
most durable and substantial manner. 
Some idea of the ra])id growth of this 
county miiy be gained from the fact that 
the total valuation of taxable property in 
1850 was 82,412,481, while at the present 
time it is over Slfi,0(l(),()0(>. The popula- 
tion of the county in 1840 was 12,502; in 
1850 it was 15,071, in l^tiO it was 19,300, 
in 1870 it was 21,981, while in 1880 it 
was 25,256. 



eity of ^lielbyyille. 



As before .stated,tlie Legislature in 1821 
appointed n board of commissioners to se- 
lect a place for the location of a capital of 
the county. Town sites were offered them 
from which to make a choice and they 
•chose the j)resent site of Shelby ville which 
■consisted of a tract of 70 acres; John Hen- 
dricks donating 40 acres, John Walker 10 
acres and James Davison 20 acres; so 
that these three gentlemen may be con- 
sidered as the original founders of the 
•city. It was understood that tlie proceeds 
of the sale of the laud donated were to 
defray the expenses of a courthouse. The 
county commissioners therefore appointed 
an agent, the Hon. Abel Cole.to begin the 
preliminary work necessary. On the f 5th 
of August, 1822, he was authorized to 
■"proceed to survey or cause to be survey- 
ed and laid oif into streets,alleys and town 
lots, all the west half of the donation 
made by John Hendricks and John 
AValker, at and adjoining the place estab- 
lished for the seat of justice." In the fol- 
lowing September the first disposal of lots 
took place, and it will illustrate the finan- 
•cial condition of these times to recall the 
terms of sale. They were: one-twelth in 
hand, the balance in three annual pay- 
anents with interest from date of sale, if 
not paid at maturity." Soon after this 
the Public Square was cleared of trees 
and improvements were begun upon sev- 
eral lots. A discount of eight per cent 
was allowed to those paying cash in full. 
The lots brought from SoO to 850 each, 
those fronting ou the Public Square sell- 



ing for $50. Francis Walker, Henry 
Gatewood and Ezra McCabe made the 
first opening in the town. Henry Gate- 
wood bought the lot upon which the Jack- 
son House was built, for S50. The first 
house erected was the home of Francis 
Walker, and it stood on the north-west 
corner of Washington and Tompkins Sts. 
From this modest beginning Shelby- 
ville has become one of the most beauti- 
ful and interesting places in the state. Its 
j)resent population is over 4,000 and the 
amount of taxable property reaches near- 
ly 81,700,000. For a long time its growth 
was very slow. Kot until January, I'-SO, 
was the town incorporated by a special 
act of the Legislature. Geo. Caruthers, 
Sr., was elected mayor,and J. S. Campbell, 
Jas. M. Randall, W. H. Coats, Jas. Elliott 
and E. H. Davis councilmen, 156 votes 
were cast. The second election under this 
charter was held in April, 1852, and re- 
sulted in the choice of John Jlorrison, 
Jlayor. Population, 1,407 whites and 17 
colored, 241 votes being cast. July 15th, 
1853, the office of I\Iayor was discontin- 
ued, the present city organization dating 
from May IGth, 1860. Since that time 
the city has made rapid advancement in 
wealth and importance. Excellent and 
comniodius business houses have been 
erected. Blessing's Opera House while it 
may be surpassed in size is not excelled 
in finisli, convenience and ventilation.and 
will compare favorably with any build- 
ing of the kind in the state. The Nation- 
al Bank building, Shelby Bank, Phanix 



104 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



Block, and a number of others are spa- 
cious brick buikliiig-s a credit to any city. 
Substantial and graceful residences loom 
up in every direction and indicate the 
comfortable circumstances and tastes of 
their owners. 

PUBLIC liUILDIKGS. 

The first Court House ^vas erected in 
1825. It stood upon the center of the 
square, was a two-story brick building 50- 
xGO feet in size and cost ?3,?)00. The 
present Court House was built in 1852. 
Its size is 75.k100 feet and its cost 847,000. 

The first jail was erected of logs on 
the Public Square in 1S23, and cost about 
$200. The second stood on the corner of 
Harrison and ]3roadway. It was a log 
structure erected in l>2('i at a co.'^t of about 
$300. The third stood upon the square 
adjoining the present Court House; cost 
about $1,000 and was built of stone in 
1841. The one now in use was erected 
in the years 1872-74. Its size is 50x95 
and its cost was §52,000. Tlie City Hall, 
situated on the north side of Washington 
Street is a handsome brick edifice 30x60 
feet iu size. It is surmounted by a cupu- 
lo for the fire alarm bell and the first fioor 
contains the engine room and city prison. 
The original cost was S2,S00 but consider- 
able has been spent upon it in improve- 
ments. 

SCHOOLS. 

Indiana has one of the best school sys- 
tems of any state iu the Union. Shelby- 
ville is not behind other cities in the stata 
in doing her part toward perfecting tliis 
ystera. The present Seminary is massive 
and commodious and was erected at a cost 
of 835,000. The school has both the 
Higher and English departments. Up- 
wards of 900 children are in attendance. 
There are also the usual number of class- 
ical schools outside of the Public School 
system. 



CHURCHES. 

There are eight churches here: The 
Methodist Episcopal, the Second M. E., 
the First Baptist, the Second Baptist, the 
Catholic, the Christian, the First Presby- 
terian, the Second Presbyterian German, 

GAS WORKS. 

Shelbyville is lit by gas, the works hav- 
ing been built in the spring of 1 874, the 
city being first lighted in April of that 
year. 

FIRE PROTECTION. 

In 1874 a first-class steam fire engine 
was purchased together with 1,000 feet of 
hose and reel, at a cost of $0,000, and has 
since performed valuable and effective 
service. 

In conclusion we will add tliat Shelby- 
ville with its streets well graded and thor- 
oughly drained, is a popular trading place 
throughout the county in every direction. 
There has been more houses in demand 
han the supply. Its railroad, telegraph- 
ic and mail facilities, protection against 
fire, and advantages of access by fine roads 
make this place second to none other of 
its size in the state. Yet its mercantile in- 
terests largely outweigh its manufactures. 
As manufacturiug is the principal source 
of growth of cities at the present day one 
cannnot help but feel surprised that great- 
er efforts are not made to develop the 
great manufacturing facilities the city 
possesses. Its business men are able and 
energetic, and brief historical sketches of 
the principal firms will be found in the 
pages which follow, to which the reader's- 
attention is particularly directed; as they 
contain more detailed and valuable in- 
formation than can be readily obtained 
from any other source. These articles- 
are based upon facts collected with much 
trouble by the publishers with a view of 
disclosing more fully the resources of 
the City of Shelbyville. 



CITY OF SHELBYVILLE. 



105 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SHEL- 
BYVILLE. 
Among the mo.-.t successful and popular of 
the financial and fiduciary institutions of the 
State of Indiana, the First National Bank of 
Shelbyville must be accorded an honorable 
place and conspicuous rank, not only on 
account of the success attendant upon a useful 
career, but from the extent of its operations, its 
capital, and .idmirahle and conservative man- 
agement since its organization in iSf>5, when 
it was incorporated under the national bank- 
ing laws with a capital stock of $(i5,ocx); which 
was, in December, 1869, increased to $100,000, 
at which sum it has nominally remained, al- 
though oti'icial statements show an accumu- 
lated surplus of inore than $50,000. The 
original ollicers of the bank were Wm. Mc- 
Clure, presiilent; John Blessing, vice-presi- 
dent; and A. D. Lynch, cashier. The otlicers, 
as at present organized, are John Elliott, presi- 
dent; Alfred Alajor, vice-president; John A. 
Young, cashier; and Chnrles W. Culbcrtson, 
assistant cashier. This institution, imder such 
a directory and manageinent has become syn- 
onymous with solvency and prosperity, and is 
justly entitled to the consideration which it has 
acquired in commercial and financial circles, 
both at home and abroad. A gentral banking 
business is transacted in loans, discoimts, tie- 
posits, collections and exchange, and patrons 
may relv that any business entrusted to this 
bank will receive prompt and careful attention. 

S. B. MORRIS, 

Dry Goods, Carpets, Etc., N. W. Cor. 

Public Square. 
Confident that public sentiment and the facts 
in the case will bear us out in the assertion, 
and acquit us of any desire of instituting 
invidious comparisons, we feel safe in ventur- 
ing the statement that the popular establish- 
ment of Mr. S. B. Morris, familiarly known 
as "The double store," is one of the most ex- 
tensive and progressive mercantile houses in 
Eastern Indiana. This representative estab- 
lishinent was founded by Mr. Morris in 1(575, 
on a capital of onlv $5,000, and the first year's 
transactions did not exceed $25,000; while for 
1SS3 the aggregate sales were more than 
$105,000, and indications point to a considera- 
ble increase upon that amount during the 
present year. The building occupied for busi- 
ness purposes is a substantial and commodious 
two-story structure, in the form of a T, with 
its main entrance and frontage on the public 
square, affording three spacious and well- 
lighted rooms for the display of stock, of the 
following dimensions: one 26x100, one 20x66, 
and one iSxSo feet, forming one of the largest 
and mostcoinplete houses devoted to mercantile 
purposes in the state. The business transacted 
is l>oth whole^ale and retail, and the stock 
carried, which is lull and complete in every 
department, embraces comprehensive lines of 
foreign and domestic dry goods, woolens, do- 
mestics, white goods, dress fabrics, linens, 
laces, embroideries, trimmings, ladies' and 



gentlemen's furnishing goodf, cloaks and suits, 
millinery goods of every description, fancy 
goods and notions, carpets, oil cloths, rugs and 
mats, and a great variety of miscellaneous 
merchandise pertaining to these special 
branches of trade, which, owing to the 
unrivalled tacilities enioved bv Mr. Slorris, he 
is enabled to otter at either wholesale or retail, 
at prices such as to defy successful competi- 
tion. In connection with the business above 
referred to, Mr. Morris conducts a first-class 
merchant tailoring department, presided over 
bv a skilled and artistic cutter, where special 
attention is devoted to the inanufacture of" 
fashionable and serviceable suits and garments 
lor gentlemen's wear from the choicest fabrics 
of foreign and American looms. A fine line 
of piece goods is always carried in stock; the 
latest metropolitan fashions are received 
simultaneously with their appearance in New 
York and Philadelphia, and perfect satisfaction 
is guaranteed in quality, style, fit, workman- 
ship and price. Mr. Morris, who is one of our 
representative successful business men and 
prominent citizens, is a native of Shelby 
County, and was born in 1830. He has been 
president of the Shelbyville Building and Loan 
Association since its organization, and lor the 
past three years has held the responsible posi- 
tion of treasurer of the city school funds. In 
the general management of his extensive busi- 
ness interests, he is ably assisted by his two 
sons, and an average ol twenty-six salesmen 
and assistants in the various departments. 

KARMIRE, MAJOR tS: BROWN, 

Hardware, Agricultural Imple- 
ments, Etc.; Washingtov St. 
One of the most extensive, as well as one of 
the oldest established houses of its class in this 
section of the State, is the popular hardware 
and agricultural implement house of Messrs. 
Karmire, Major & Brown, which was origin- 
ally founded more than filteen years ago by 
Mr. Charles E. Karmire on a comparatively 
small scale as a grocery house. He subse- 
qucntlv abandoned that branch of business, 
disposing of hi-, stock, stand and good will to- 
other parties, and devoted his attention exclu- 
sively to the hardware and agricultural supply 
trade, in which line he continued alone until 
January 1st, 1884, when Messrs. Major & 
Brown were admitted to an interest in the busi- 
ness, and the firm- name and style became as 
at present. The premises occupied tor business 
purposes embrace a commodious and substan- 
tial brick building, with large ware-rooms^ 
attached, giving an aggregate floor space ot 
more than 20,cxx3 square teet, which is covered 
to its utmost storage capacity with an im- 
mense and comprehensive assortment of every 
description of heavy and shelf hardware, 
building materials, carpenters' and mechanics' 
tools, imported and American cutlery, agri- 
cultural implements, and all the latest 
improved varieties of farm machinery, em- 
bracing almost, if not quite, every article. 
required about a farm for the successful anu 



106 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



economical tillage of the soil. From twelve to 
fifteen salesmen and assistants are regularly 
employed in the dift'erent departments, and as 
an evidence of the ("rowth of the business, we 
tnay state that durintj the lirsl year's existence 
of this house (in iS6y) the annual transactions 
did not reach $iS,ooo; while at the present 
time they will exceetl ^tio.ooo. While a recap- 
itulation of the numerous articles carried in 
etock would he impossiple in the liinits allot- 
ted in the present volume, we may mention a 
few leading varieties of machinery, for which 
this representative firm are exclusive agents in 
this county, viz.; the celebrated Nichols & 
Shepard threshers, traction engines, etc., 
manufactured at Battle Creek, Michigan; the 
Deering binders, of Chicago; the Reeves straw 
stackers, of Columbus, Indiana; the renowned 
Weir plows, the famous Studcbaker wagons, 
of South IJend, Indiana; bugi;ies, plKutons, and 
light w;igons from the world renowned Col- 
umbus Uuggv Comj^anv, of Columbus, Ohio; 
and numerous other standard varieties of im- 
plements and machinery. In the line of agri- 
cultural machinery, this well known house is 
perhaps the most proininent and extensive m 
this state. Mr. C E Karmire, the t'ounder and 
senior member of this leading house, is a native 
of Germany, but has been a resident of Indiana 
since 1S65. The other members of the tirtn, 
A. L. Major and K. J. Brown, are both natives 
and life-long residents of this state. With am- 
ple capital, unri\alled facilities, an honored 
reputation, this representative house is entitled 
to the consideration and patronage of the pub- 
lic in this and the adjoining counties, from 
which its trade is principally derived. 

CONREY, WALLAR .V DEPREZ, 

The Conri^y, Wai.lar A: Deprez Fur- 

NITl/RE Co.MPANY, W A.SHINGTON St. 

The amount of capital invested in the furni- 
ture business in the United States, and the 
number of hands to whom, either directly or 
indirectly, it furnishes employment, renders 
this one of the most important factors of our 
national industrial and commercial system. 
One of the leading houses of Shelbvville, and 
one of the most extensive of its cla*s in the 
state, making a specialty of manufacturing 
every description of chamber sets and dressing 
cases, from the plainest to those of the most 
highly ornamental and elaborate designs, is 
that now conducted under the stvle of the 
Conrey, Wallar A: Deprez Furniture Com- 
pany, the outgrowth of an enterprise inaugu- 
rated in this city upon a comparatively small 
scale in 1S74. The business was materially 
increased and the facilities considerably en- I 
larged in ibi83, at which time are-organization ] 
was elVected and the present company was 
formed and incorporated under the laws of the 1 
State of Indiana, with an authorized capital | 
stock of $ioo.<xDo. The company has now in i 
course of construction a new and sp.acious fac- i 
tory building to take the phice of their old I 
ones, which will, when completed, be one of 1 
the most complete and thoroughly equipped ' 



establishments of its class in the state. The 
new building is a solid aud snbstantial brick 
structure 50x230 feet in dimensions, containing 
three stories and biisement, and will be sup- 
plied with all the latest improved designs of 
wood-working and labor-saving machinery, 
for the economical and expeditious prosecu- 
tujn of the business upon an extensive scale. 
The ofhce and ware-rooms of the company, 
located on Washington .St., near the public 
square, occupy a commodious three story 
brick building 6oxJOo feet in dimensions; a 
portion of which is also used for the finishing 
department. 'I'he products of this company 
consist of new, elegant, and original designs of 
walnut furniture, and re-productions in cheaper 
materials of the most elaborate and orna- 
mental styles, which are sold by them to deal- 
ers, and shipped in car-load lots to the 
principal cities in all sections of the United 
States and territories. An average force of 
fully one hundred experienced workmen is 
regularly employed in the different depart- 
ments, and the sales for the year 1SS3 amount- 
ed in round numbers to $167,000, an increase 
of about $Jo,fxx) over those of the preceding 
year; while present indications point to a still 
more gratifying increase for the present ve.ar. 
The individual members and otticers oi the 
company, as at present organized, are, D. L. 
Conrey, president; Z. B. Wallar, vice-presi- 
dent; ami John C. Deprez, secretary, 'j'hese 
gentlemen are all old residents and well known 
citizens of -Shelby County, and possess a 
detailed and comprehensive knowledge of all 
branches and departments of the furniture 
business, from the time w hen the raw material 
reaches the workinan's hand until it emerges 
from the finisher's touch, in all its beauty and 
elegance of design and ornamentation. 

PARRISH & MILLESON, 

Wholesale and Retail Drtgs, Etc., 

PiRLic Square. 
The most prominent drug house in .Shelby- 
ville, as well as the oldest under one manage- 
ment, is that of Messrs. Parrish i^ Milleson, 
on the public square, Avhere a sales-room 
30x75 feet in dimensions is occupied for sales 
and manufacturing purposes. This representa- 
tive house was established about twelve years 
ago by Dr. J. W. Parrish, the pre-cnt senior 
member of the firm, who subsequently admit- 
ted his son, Mr. C. J. Parrish, to an interest in 
the business. In February, 1884, the present 
partnership was formed, succeeding to the 
business previously conducted under the firm 
name and style of Parrish ..^ Son. The stock 
carried comprises a general line of drugs and 
medicines, chemicals, dyestutTs, paints, oils, 
varnishes, painters' supplies, wall papers, win- 
dow shades, wines and liquors for medicinal 
purposes, the standard proprietary remedies 
and ph.armaceutical compounds of the day — 
including several of their own manufacture, 
cigars, tobacco, notions, toilet articles, pcrt'um- 
ery and druggists' sundries generally. The 
facilities enjoyed by this firm are such that 



CITY OF SHELBYVILLE. 



107 



thev are enabled to 6upp1v dealers in adjoining 
towns with lull lines of merchandise in their 
line at prices equally as low as similar articles 
-can be procured in the lar^e cities, and at a 
considerable saving of time, expense and 
freight charges. One traveling salesman is 
kept constantly on the road in the interests of 
this house, and seven as>istants are employed 
in the various departments, including cigar 
■department and laboratory. Special att-ntion 
is also paid to the retail trade, and to the accu- 
rate preparation of physicians' prescriptions 
and family recip>-s bv skilled and experienced 
pharmaci^ts. This firm are also sole proprie- 
tors and maniifacturers of Ur. l^arrish's Hlood 
Restorative or Compound Wine of Pepsine. 
I'arrish's Hulmonarv Balsam, Dr. Parri--h's 
Anodyne Liniment, Dr. I'arrish's Medicamen- 
turn and Dr. Parri^h's .Sugar-coated Liver Pills. 
"These preparations, m.-ide from a formula of 
the senior njemher of the firm, have a wide 
reputation and extended sale, and have 
received the most tlatlering trsiimonials from 
prominent members of the medical fraternity 
in lhi> and adjoining states. The individual 
members of the firm are Dr. J. \V. Parri>h and 
>L F. Milleson, the former being a regularly 
■cdueatetl phvsician, and a practitioner ot moi'e 
th.in thirty year.> experience. The business of 
this house is both whole-ale and retail, and 
extends to all points within a radius of fifty 
miles in each direction. 

.SHELBY BANK, 

Sa.muei. Hamilton, M.\n'.\ger. 
Among the cotemporaneous fiduciary insti- 
tutions of Eastern Indiana, the Shelby 15ank 
of Shtlbvville, ha^, since its establishment in 
1S55, maintained a position of undoul)ted con- 
sideration, and its operation- in the line of dis- 
-counts, deposits, general loans, exchange and 
•collections are of considerable magnitude. 
the number of depositors at the present time 
is more than four hundred — the largest num- 
ber on the books of any bank in .Shelbyville. 
The bank is prepared to make special arrange- 
ments with its patrons for time deposit-, upon 
which liberal interest is allowed, and special 
and prompt attention is devoted to collections 
.upon the most advantageous terms. The offi- 
cers of this bank are Samuel Hamilton, presi- 
dent and manager; and T. W. Fleming, 
cashier. Mr. Hamilton, who is one of our most 
prominent citizens and capitalists, is entitled to 
a prominent rank among the representative 
self-made men of the present age, havingtom- 
menced life as a poor hoy, and bv industry, 
-economy and ability, attained his present hiah 
position as one of the solid and substantial 
-citizens of .Shelby Countv. and one of the most 
reliable and favorably known bankers of In<ii- 
.ana. Under his judicious and able manage- 
ment of its allairs, the career of the Shelbv 
Bank, smce its inception, has been character- 
ized by a safe and conservative policy, which 
has greatly aided the strength and standing of 
•the institution; and altogether, the bank is 
conceded to be one of the most desirable 



monetary concerns in this section with which 
to establish profitable and satisfactory rela- 
tions. 



M. CARITHERS, 

Carriaoes, Buggies, Wagons, Etc., 
East Broadway. 
The favorable location of .Shelbvville, both 
with reference to its admirable facilities for 
procuring an abundant supply of the best ma- 
terial for carriage work and its field of trade, 
being situated in the heart of a progressive and 
thriving agricultural an^l lumber producing 
district, renders this a most desirable place for 
manufacturing carriages, buggies, wagons, etc., 
with a home demand sufVicient to support a 
large number of skilled and experienced opera- 
tives, and to render this one of the most im- 
portant of our local industries. One of the 
oldest e^tabli-bed. most extensive and favora- 
bly known hou-e- engaged in this special 
branch of productive industry is that now con- 
ducted bv the enterpri-ing manufacturer, Mr. 
NL Carithers, whose works and repository are 
located on East Broadway in a commodious 
tv%T)-storv building 66x100 feet in dimensions. 
This representative establishment had its in- 
cepfion over twenty years ago, when it was 
founded bv the firm of Smart, Dearland & 
Austin, who were followed by Mr. Smart 
alone, and then the firm of Smart \' Moore, 
whoconducted the bu-ine.-s until 1S75, when 
they disposed of their interest to Mr. Carithers, 
who lias since carried it on successfully, and 
coiriderablv cnlar'jed his facilities and the 
scope of his operatioi.s. He now employs an 
average fone 01 ten skilled and experienced 
workmen, turning out annually fiom seventy- 
five to one hundred new jobs, and making a 
prominent specialty of general repairing in 
both the iron, wood working, trimming and 
painting departments. The superior excellence 
of the work turned out by .%lr. Carithers has 
redoun<ied to the benefit of .Shelbwille's in- 
dustrial and commercial thrift by driving from 
this market the inferior styles of shoddy w ork 
introduced in many communities by irrespon- 
sible manufacturers at a distance, whose car- 
riages and wagons are made to sell, and not 
for actual service. Occupying a position sec- 
ond to none of his contemporaries of Eastern 
Indiana as a reliable manufacturer, Mr. Car- 
ithers is entitled to the most f'avorabie consid- 
eration of our cilizens for his efforts in 
developing and prosecuting on such a liberal 
scale this important industry in our midst, and 
establishing a trade not merely of a local char- 
acter, but extending into remote sections of the 
state. Mr. Carithers is a thoroughly practical 
carriage and wagon maker, who has devoted 
many years to familiarizing himself yvith all 
branches and departments ofthe business. He 
was born in Neyv York State in iS-!,v but lias 
been a resident of this state since 1865, and for 
nearly twenty years prominently identified 
with this special" branch of trade, and with the 
commercial and industrial development ot our 
thriving and prosperous inland municipalitj . 



108 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



KENNEDY &!. MAJOR, 

Druggists and Apothecaries; Harri- 
son St. 
The old established and reliable pharmacy 
on Harrison St.. now conducted by the firm of 
Kennedy i; Major, is one ol the few mercan- 
tile hou--cs of Shelhy County which traces its 
origin in a direct line of succesi^ion to nii/e 
belliim days, having been t'ounded more than 
thirty years ago by Dr. S. D. Day. During 
the past three decailes this representative 
establishment has passed through numerous 
hands and changes of management; but dur- 
ing the entire period it has maintained a high 
rank, both with the medical tratcrnity and 
with the general public, on account of the imi- 
formly reliable character of merchandise 
handled, and the great care exercised in the 
preparation of physicians' prescriptions, I'amily 
recipes and pharmaceutical compounds. The 
pre.-ent lirm succeeded Mr. |. H. Leclers in 
the latter part of 1SS3, and under their ener- 
getic and judicious management, the well 
earned reputation of this old house has been 
maintained; where is carried at all times a 
complete and comprehensive line of pure 
drugs and chemicaN, tinctures, extracts, syr- 
ups, elixirs, essences, etc., tl;o standard proprie- 
tary medicines of the day, toilet articles, tancy 
goods, druggists' sundries, cigars, tobacco, 
stationery, paints, oils, varnishes, brushes, and 
all kinds of painters' supplies, a ])rominent 
specialty being made of this latter class ol 
merchandise. The individual partners are 
James G. Kennedy and Ed. Major, both of 
whom are educated and experienced pharma- 
cists and chemists, I'aniiliar with the nature, 
properties, and medicinal virtues of the arti- 
cles dispensed. 

PHILIP F. SINDLINGER, 

Pork Packer; Cur. Washington and 

Pike Srs. 
The pork packing house and model meat 
market of Mr. Philip F. Sindlinger, on the 
corner of Washington and Pike Sts., was 
established by its present proprietor on the 
satne corner about twenty years ago on a very 
small scale, and literally "without a dollar" as 
a cash capital, but with a thorough knowledge 
of the business, and a determination to deserve 
and achieve success by industry, economy and 
honorable dealing. How well Mr. Sindlinger 
has succeeded in his laudable endeavors may 
be seen from the extensive business wiiich has 
grown up under his energetic management, 
and trom the beautiful building which he has 
erected upon the site where his early successes 
were achieved. This is the most substantial 
and attractive building on the street, and is a 
fine two-story brick structure 44x62 leet in 
dimensions, occupied as lamily residence and 
meat market. The latter is the finest and most 
complete, as well as the most extensive estab- 
lishment of its kind in Shelby County — fur- 
nished in metropolitan style with all the mod- 
ern conveniences, including marble counters, 
a fine refrigerator of the latest improved 



design, an otlice conveniently and tastefultT 
arranged, and fixtures of the most elegant 
style. Mr. Sindlinger carries always in stock 
the best kinds of fresh, salt, and smoked meat* 
of every description, pure lard ol his own ren- 
dering, and bologna and sau-age of his own 
t7ianiifacture. In addition to the regidar mar- 
ket trade, he supplies a'l the surrounding 
towns with smoked anil salt meats, and 
transacts a large wholesale busintss in 
packed pork, etc. His slaughter houses, pack- 
ing houses, ice houses, etc., are fitted up in first- 
class style, and a gas engine is eniplo\ed for a 
variety of purposes connected with his exten- 
sive operations in these departments. To the 
selection of stock, Mr. Sinillinger devotes hi* 
personal attention, and slaughters only the 
finest beeves, hogs, calves, sheep, etc. Mr. 
Sindlinger is a native of the city of Philadel- 
phia, and was born in 1S39. lie is thoroughly 
and practically conversant with all depart- 
ments of the business, and by his own unaided 
etTorts has not only established a large and 
lucrative trade throughout this entire section, 
but has amassed a handsome competency. 

SHELBY machine: WORKS, 

P. D. Harri.s, Proi"'k.; Jackson St. 
To supplv the demand for the various 
article.s of labor-saving machinery and their 
component parts, which the requirements of 
this progressive age demard in the ditlerent 
departments of the mechanical arts, the Shelby 
Machine Works were ctabli-lied in liSjg by 
.Mr. P. D. Harrrs, a skilled and experienced 
machinist and mechanician, who now occupies, 
for business purposes, a two-story brick build- 
ing on Jackson St., 20x50 teet in dimensions, 
with a one-story frame building J4XJ6 leet in 
size as blacksmith snop. Among the prrxiucts 
of these works, saw arbors of improved con- 
struction constitute a special leature; while 
particular attention is devoted to repairing 
machinery of all descriptions, and to general 
jobbing in all its branches. Mr. Harris also 
carries in stock a lull line of brass goods for 
steam and water fitting, steam and water 
gauges, iron pipe and fittings of all sizes, and 
parts of machines in ordinary u'ie. This is the 
only house of its class in Shelbyville; and 
since its lirst year the annual transactions have 
increased more than 100 per cent. The works 
are equipped with all the requi>ite machinery 
for the succes^ful prosecution of the business 
in its dift'erent department*, pio)K'lIed by steam 
power, and the facilities enjoyed nv Mr. Harris 
are such as to enable him to salislactorily per- 
Ibrm any description of work pertaining to the 
important avocation of the machinist. Mr. 
Harris is a native of this state — was born in 
1S41, and is a thoroughly practical and experi- 
enced machinist, familiar with all the details 
of the buNiness. During the war of the rebel- 
lion, he entered the service of his country as a 
member of the loth Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try, and for three years was connected with 
that gallant organization in the Armv of the 
Cumberland under General Thomas, and par- 



CITY OF SHELBYVILLE. 



109 



ticipated in many of the most memorable and 

important marches, campaigns and engage- 
ments ol that eventlul period of our country's 
history. 

JOHN }I. PEDDICORD, 

ltvf.ry, p^ekd and sale stable; no. 

55 Wasiiini;ton St. 
Among the largest, most thoroughly 
equipped, and best conducted livery, sales and 
boarding stables in the city of Shelbyville, is 
that of Mr. John H. Peddicord, located at No. 
55 Washington St. These stables were orig 
inally creeled in 1S65 by Messrs. Powell & 
Spurer, and since that time they have passed 
through several changes of management, and 
numerous additions and iini)ro\'ements have 
from time to time been made. 'I'he premises 
have a frontage of seventy-two feet on Wash- 
ington St., and adeptli of ninetv-iiitje feet; and 
the main building, with its additions and out 
buildings, are adnn'rably adapted in every way 
for the pm'poses for which they are employed. 
The stables have ample accommodations for 
one hundred head of horses at one lime, and in 
the livery department, from six to ten fine 
horses are regularly kept, with a number of 
stylish and comfortable carriages, phaetons, 
buggies, road wagons, etc., suitable forbusiness 
excursions or pleasure trips, which are let at 
the most reasonable terms. Sjiecial attention 
is paid to supplying conveyances for commer- 
cial travelers and their sample cases to adjoin- 
ing towns not on the line of the railroad, and 
to furnishing appropriate vehicles and rigs for 
funeral or festive occasions. Mr. Peddicord 
assumed the management of these stables in 
January, 1SS4, at which lime he purchased the 
interest of and succeeded John F. Reed, iile 
is thoroughly reliable and conscientious in his 
dealings, and all representations made by him 
vill be found to accord strictly with the facts. 

GEORGE C. TH.\CIIER, 

Grocery; No. i Ray Hocse Block. 
Mr. George C. Thacher, one of our most 
enterprising merchants, successful business 
men and public-spirited citizens, established 
his present popular grocery and provision 
house in iS6j, and Irom a comparatively small 
begmning, has witnessed a most gratifving in- 
crease, more than commensurate with the 
growth even of our prosperous and progressive 
city, his sales for the pa>=t vear exxeeding bv 
more than 300 per cent tho>e of his first years 
transactions. lie occupies, for business pur- 
poses, the entire first fioor and baseinent, each 
20x100 feet in dimensions, in the four story- 
brick structure known as the Ray House 
Block, where he carries a complete and com- 
prehensive line of the best varieties of staple 
and fancy family groceries provisions, pro- 
duce, etc, making a prominent specialty of ship- 
ping to the large cities farm and dairv 
produce, field seeds, etc. His tra.ie, which is 
principally local, and from a radius of twenty 
miles in each direction, will compare favorably 
with that of any similar house in Eastern In- 



SHELBVVILLE PLANING MILLS, 

DooR.s, Sash, Blinds, Etc. ; J. R. Stew- 
art, PriiI'KIUTOR. 
The Slielbvville planing mills, and sash, 
blind, and door factory of Mr. J. R. Stewart, 
now one of the most im]iorlant ofourcom- 
tnercial interests and local industries, were 
established on a very small scale as early as 
in 1S53, and were the first works of the kind 
in Shelby County. From a comparatively in- 
significant comniencement nearly a third of a 
century ago, the growth of this enterprise has 
been more than commensurate with the devel- 
opment of our thriving inland city, and an 
annual business of more than $40,000 is trans- 
acted, with a large and steadily increasing 
demand lor the products of these mills, extend- 
ing to remote sections of this and adjoining 
counties. The ground sjiace occujiied by Mr. 
Stewart on Jackson and Pike Sts., covers an 
area of 1)9x199 feet, upon which is erected a 
commodious two-story structure 50x80 feet in 
dimensions lor manufacturing purposes, a 
brick engine house 22x32 feet in size, with 
numerous other smaller buildings and shed s 
for storage purposes. The main building is 
thoroughly equipped with the latest improved 
designs of wood-working machinery, which is 
propelled bv one lit'tv horse-power engine and 
boiler. An average force of twenty skilled and 
experienced workmen is regularly emjiloyed 
in the manufaciure of doors, sash, blinds, win- 
dow and door Iranies. mouldings, stair work, 
and building materials of every description, 
which are carried constantly in stock or fin- 
ished to order in the best style of workman- 
ship, and at the lowest rales consistent with 
first-class material and reliable work. These 
are at the present time the most extensive 
mills of the kind in Slielbv County, and in the 
matter of appointment and equi]iment, not 
excelled bv any in the state. In addiiion to a 
large stock of finished material, Mr. Stewart 
possesses unsurpassed facilities for supplying 
lumber in the rough, and all needed materials 
for building purposes, at the shortest notice 
and upon the most reasonable terms. Mr. 



diana. Mr. Thacher was born in this city in 
1839, on the site where now stands his private 
residence. Since attaining his majorilv, he 
has been prominently identified with the com- 
mercial interests and material prosperity of his 
native city. He has taken an active and con- 
spicuous part in political matters, both local, 
state, and national, as a consistent and enthu- 
siastic member of the great national Demo- 
cratic party, and has been repeatedly called bv i 
the sutl'rages of his fellow-citizens to fill posi- 
tions of honor, emolument and trust within 
their gift. From iS()5 to 18^19 he ably repre- 
sented this district in the slate legislature and 
has been lor seven years an infiuential mem- 
ber of the school board, acting as treasurer or 
president during the entire period. His suc- 
cess as a merchant may be attributed to the 
enterprising, liberal and honorable methods of 
dealing which have characterized his career. 



110 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



Stewart, who is one of our most prominent 
and public-spiriteti citizens, as. w ell as a most 
successful manufacturer, is a native iif ihc .State 
of Penns^'lvania, and was born in Mercer 
County in 1S3J. He lias been a resident of 
Indiana for more than ihirtv-three years, and 
has been for manv _vear.~ proiiiiiientlv identi- 
fied with the local' iiitere.»ts of Jjlielbvville.and 
with its growth, development and progress in 
many wavs. He lilled the responsible position 
of chief of the cilv fire department for a period 
often years, and has served five consecutive 
terms as a member of the city council. 

JAMES D. WALKER, 

GROCEKIES AND I'KOVIblONS, WaSIIIXG- 

TON Street. 
Orii^inally established in 1S7S by Mr. E. A. 
Rocktield the popular fjrocery and ])rovision 
house and family supply store now conducted 
by Mr. James 1). Walker on Washington St. 
claims conspicuous recogtiition as among the 
representative establishments of its class in 
Shelby ville. Mr. Walker assumed the man- 
agement of this business in iSSi and under his 
enterprising and energetic management the 
trade has gradually but steadily increased until 
its transactions will compare favorably with 
tiiose of any contemporaneous establishment 
in the city. 'J'he stock carried which is kept 
full and complete comprises a general line of 
the choicest varieties of staple and fancy t'ami 
ly groceries and provisions, notions, farm and 
dairy produce and all kinds of household su|i- 
plies pertaining to the table and culinary de- 
partment. Mr. Walker a native of this state, 
was born in 1S47. He is one of our most es 
teemed and highly respected citizens and in 
iSSi was honored by the appointment from 
Councils of City Treasurer an ollice which he 
tilled with credit and ability to the entire satis- 
faction of his constituents of both political par- 
ties. 

GEO. M. GOULDING, 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods; 
Ray Hol'se Block. 
From the lime when our first parents pro- 
cured their primitive garments from the tig 
trees of the garden of Eden, (the tirst instance 
of the use of ready-maile clothing on record; 
the climatic changes and the requirements of 
a more advanced civilization have necessitated 
numerous important moditicatioiis and im- 
provements in style; but it is safe to assert that 
in no former period of the world's history has 
the art of manulacturing gentlemen's garments 
attained such a degree of proliciency as at the 
present time, and never has there been a 
period when perl'cct-fining, well-made, slylisli 
suits have been offered at such astonishingly 
low prices as in the present year of our Lord, 
1SS4. A verification of this statement maybe 
made bv an inspection of tiie admirably 
selected assortment of reliable and stylish gar- 
ments displayed on the shelves and counters 
of Mr. George M. Goulding's popular clothing 
emporium in the Ray House block, and a com- 



parison of his prices witli those which in for- 

nier seasons wire paid for the same class of 
goods. This reiiresentalive establishment, one 
of the leading ones of its class in Eastern In- 
diana, liad its inception in 1S70, « hen it was 
founded by its present enterprising proprietor, 
who occupies for sales purposes at the above 
named location a room 25x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, carrying a large and complete line of 
the best grades of ready-made clothing from 
the leading manufacturers of the L'nion, l"ur- 
nishing goods and gentlemen's underwear, 
liats, caps, etc., selected with an express view 
to the requirements of the better class of city 
and country trade. From a comparatively 
small beginning, Mr. Gouldini; has by his 
enterprising, liberal and honorable methods of 
dealing, established a trade w hich will at the 
present time considerabh- exceed $j^,ooo per 
aimum, and which is steadily increasing with 
each succeeding season. .Mr. Goulding is a 
native of this state, and has been for many 
years identified with this special branch of 
trade, with all departments of which he is 
practically familiar. His suits ranging in 
price from $5 to $25 are manulactured ex- 
pressly for his trade irom the best fabrics of 
Amei'ican and foreign looms, antl tor st\ le, til, 
workmanship and finish, aie fully equal to any 
custom-made work, while the prices are inva- 
riably lower. 

M. G. MURDOCH, 

Ll.mhef;, Grain, Flour, Etc.; East 

Washington St. 
This business, which was established bv its 
present enterprising proprietor more than a 
quarter of a century ago, has grown from 
comparati\'ely small pro[)ortions to a consid- 
erable magnitude, entitling it to prominent 
recognition among the representative indus- 
tries of our great state. The ground S|iace 
occupied for these works and for the storage 
of logs, lumber, etc., covers an area of about 
tour acres. The saw mills, which are finely 
equipped in every particular, have a capacity 
for turning out 10.000 feet of manufactured 
lumber per dav, and can readily saw thirty loot 
stutY. From fifteen to twenty men are em- 
ployed in this department, and the motive 
power f"iir the machinery employed is supplied 
by one forty horse-power engine and boiler. 
Mr. Murdoch carries constantly in stock all 
kinds of pine and hard- wood lumber, lath, 
shingles, flooring, siding, etc., and makes a 
prominent specialty of manulacturing and 
shipping to all points of the United States, 
black walnut, a^h, oak, cherry, and other hard- 
wood lumber. His steam flouring mills, which 
have a capacity of fifty barrels of choice flour 
every twenty-four hours, contain three run of 
stone, and all the requisite appliances t"nr the 
best class of custom work, in which line he 
transacts a large and growing trade. Mr. Mur- 
doch is a native of Scotland, but an old resident 
of this county, with tiie growth and prosperity 
of w hich he has been for many years promi- 
nently identified. With nhe proverbial thrift 



CITY OF SHELBYVILLE. 



Ill 



of his countrymen iVom the land of Bruce and 
Burns, he has, In- industry, econoiny and hon- 
orable dealins(, established during his residence 
here a trade which lully entitles hi:n to promi- 
nent rank anionij our most worthy and influ- 
ential citizens and successful business men. 

J. B. GRIFFEY & CO., 

Tin", Coppkr and Siieet-irox Ware; 
South SiDK Puui.ic Sciuare. 
The history of the well known house of J. 
B. GrilVev \' Co. furnishes an admirahle illus- 
tration oi" what may be accomplished by ener- 
gy, industry, and well directed elVort. Estab- 
lished in 1S76, with a cash capital of $fioo, but 
with a thoroui^h compreliension of all the 
detail> of the business, and with a determina- 
tion to achieve success by earnest elVort and 
honorable dealing;, this house now occupies a 
conspicuous rank among its contemporaries, 
carr\ing a stock of not less than $io,(xx) in 
value, and transacting an annual business 
which will closely approximalr $30,000. The 
premises occupied lor sales and manufacturing 
purposes, on south side public square, are 
25x100 leet in dimensions, and in the Ibrmer 
department may be found at idl times an 
extensive and co'uprehensive stock of all 
kinds of tin, copper and sluetiron ware of 
their own nianulacture, which for variety and 
extent, will compare favorably with that ofany 
similar establishment in Eastern Indiana. In 
the manufacturing department, which is under 
the immediate supervision of the members of 
the firm, seven experienced a^^istants are em- 
ployed in the manufacture of all kinds of arti- 
cles and utensils IVom tin, copper, iron and 
other sheet metals. While special attention is 
devoted to cornice work, rooting, spouting, 
repairing, and general jobbing in all its 
branches. Mr. P. Grifl'ey is a native of 
Jeil'crson. Mr. J. li. Grilfey" was born in De- 
catur County, this state. Both are practical 
workers in sheet metals, who have had an 
extended experience in this special department 
of productive industry. By their own energy 
and enterprise they have, from a comparatively 
insigniticant beginning, established a trade 
which is not confined to local limits, and 
^vhich reflects the highest credit upon their 
business ability. 

JOSEPH SCIIOTT, 

Furn'Itvre; South Harrison St. 
Although claiming no precedence on ac- 
count of seniority — having been established as 
recently as in 1SS3, the furniture emporium of 
Mr. Joseph Schott, on South Harrison St., 
between Bioadway and Jackson St., is still 
entitled to prominent recognition among the 
representative business houses of its class in 
our thriving and progressive municipality. 
Mr. Schott occupies for sales, manufacturing 
and repairing purposes, a commodious build- 
ing 22x70 feet in dimensions, and in the former 
department carries an admirably selected stock 
of reliable and well-made plain furniture, 
chamber suits, sofas, lounges, bedsteads, bu- 



reaus, tables, parlor and kitchen furniture, etc., 
which, owing to the facilities enjoved, he i& 
enabled to offer at prices which cannot be 
readily iluplicated by any contemporaneous 
establishment in the city or countv. In the 
manufacturing department, he employs two 
skilled and experienced assistants, and devotes 
special attenlion to general repairing of all 
descriptions, and re-varnishing and modern- 
izing old furniture at the mo^t reasonable rates. 
Mr. Schott is a native of Germany, where he 
was born in 1S50. He has been a resident of 
this state for nearly twenty years, and is a 
practical cabinet-maker and furniture finisher, 
conversants with all branches of tlie business. 
Since Ihc inauguration of his present enter- 
prise, he has established a prosperous and 
steadily increasing trade, with a patronage 
derived from both city and country. 

FRANK TALBERT, 

Lu.MiiKR, Saw Mills and Wagon 
Manufactirkr ; East Hendricks St. 
This manufacturing cstablisinnent, which 
has under energetic an i enler|irisirig manage- 
ment, attained its present gratif\iiig propor- 
tions, was established on a comparatively 
small scale in iSSo, at which time the manu- 
facture of lumber constituted the principal 
business carried on, and the annual transac- 
tions for the first year did not exceed $2;,ooo. 
In 1SS2 he added to his original business the 
manufacture of \yagons, and in 1883 a planing 
mill was cslablished in connection with the 
other industries, and the annual business in- 
creaseil in less than four years to more than 
$100,000. A ground space of about tour acres 
is occupied upon which is erected a main 
building 40x200 feet in dimensions, and two 
stories in bight, which is equipped with the 
most approved designs of wood- working ma- 
chinery and appliances for the economical and 
expeditious prosecuiion of the business in its 
various departments. The motive power for 
the machinery employed is furnished bv three 
steam engines and two boiler^, giving an ag- 
gregate of seventy horse-power; and troinfilTv 
to one hundred operatives are employed, 
according to the season and the exigencies of 
trade. He manufactures and ships to remote 
states all kinds of hardwood lumber, making 
a prominent specialty of walnut, cherry, ash, 
and quartered oak; and in the manufacturing 
department turns out large numbers of road 
and log wagons, together with field rollers, 
Scotch harrows, corn markers, double and 
single shovel plows, and various kinds of farm 
implements, which meet with a ready sale 
throughout this and adjoining states. The 
farm and log wat;ons here manufactured are 
recognized as equal to the best produced in the 
United States. Mr. Talbert is a native of 
Shelby County, Indiana, and was born in 
1S42. He has been for several years promi- 
nently identified with the industrial and com- 
mercial interests of Shelbyville ; at the present 
time he represents his ward as a member of 
the city counciL With so prominent a place 



112 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



among the general industries of Eastern Indi- 
ana, and a trade so extensive, and covering in 
its various ramifications sucli a wide range at 
home and abroad, and productive of sucli a 
satisfactory revenue, the establishment con- 
ducted byhim exerts no small influence upon 
the prosperity of the city. 

DR. R. M. FLOYD, 

Wholesale and Ret.ml Drugs; Har- 
rison AND FhANKLIN StS. 
This representative house was established in 
l8So, and from its very inception has grown 
rapidly in public favor. Dr. P'loyd carries in 
stock a complete line ofthe purest and freshest 
drugs and chemicals, paints, oils, varnishes, 
wines and liquors of undoubted purity for 
medicinal purposes, the staud.ird proprietary 
remedies ofthe day, (many of his own manu- 
facture from the most approved formula^) 
toilet articles, perfumeries and druijgists' sun- 
dries generally, which he is prepared to fur- 
nish to the trade at the lowest city prices, or to 
his citv customers and rural patrons. Special 
attention is paid to the accurate preparation of 
physicians' prescriptions, lamily recipes and 
pharmaceutical compounds, and to the purity 
and excellence of all medicines dispensed. Dr. 
Floyd is sole proprietor and manul'acturer of 
the celebrated "Home Haking I'owder," 
"Floyd's Royal Rheumatic Remedy," "Glyc- 
erine Pearl," and "Dr. Floyd's Corn Sheller" 
— an infallible remedy for corns and bunions. 
He also manufactures at his laboratory and 
carries in slock from the leading manufactur- 
ing druggists of the Union, the most reliable 
extracts, tinctures, syrups, elixirs, etc., and 
apothecaries from the interior towns can here 
replenish their stocks upon equally favorable 
terins as in any ofthe large cities. Dr. Floyd 
who is a native of Indiana, is a practical phar- 
macist and chemist, as well as a regularly 
educated physician, who enjoys the advantages 
of a pr ictice of thirteen ye;irs in the prolession, 
and is a graduate ot the Ohio Medical College. 
During the latter part of the war ofthe rebel- 
lion, he entered the service ol his country as a 
member of Co. D, i4Sth Reg't., Indiana In- 
fantry, and after serving for seven months, 
during whicli time he participated in several of 
the final struggles of the Southern Con led - 
eracy; received an honorable discharge at the 
termination ot the war. 

H. E. SCHORTKMEIER, 

Groceries, Etc.; Wasiiingtox St. 
Now in the seventh year of a prosperous 
and successlid business career, during which 
time it has grown with the grouth and pros- 
perity of our inland municipality, tiie popular 
grocery and provision house of Mr. H. E. 
Ijchortemeier has maintained a high standard 
among its contemporaries; both on account of 
the uniformly excellent and reliable character 
of merchandise handled, and the honorable 
methods of dealing which have characterized 
the transactions of its enterprising proprietor. 
Mr. Schortemeier occupies for business pur- 



poses a two-story brick building on Washing- 
ion St. -0x53 Icet in dimensions, and employs 
two assistants in tlie sales department. His 
stock comjirises a general line of staple and 
fancy groceries, teas, cofteep, spices, sugars, 
canned goods^ fruits and vegetables in season, 
provisions, produce, choice cigars, manulac- 
tured tobacco, and miscellaneous merchandise, 
such as legitimately pertains to this special 
branch of trade; which, owing to the facilities 
enjoyed by him for procuring his supplies, lie 
is enabled to offer at prices as low as the low- 
est. As an evidence of the steady growth o( 
his business since its inception, it may be stated 
in this connection, that while his tirst year's 
sales did not exceed $iS,ooo. his annual trans- 
actions at the present time will not tail shortof 
$30,000. Mr. -Schortemeier is a native of 
Prussia, where he was born in 1S47. He has 
been a resident ol Indiana for the past seven 
years, and by his enterprise, energy and busi- 
ness ability, has established a trade whicli will 
compare favorably wi'h that of any similar 
house in this section ofthe state. 

BEN. JONES, 

Livery, Feed, Sale ano Com.mi.ssion 
.Stable; East Washingto.n Sr. 
Hy no means the least important of the 
manifold interests ofa busy and progressive 
community like that of Shelby ville is that of 
the livery, sale and coirimission stables, when 
conducted upon a scale of liberality and enter- 
prise, such as characterizes the operations of 
Mr. I3en. Jones, whose model establishment is 
located on the south side of East Washington 
St. These popular stables were established 
in 18S1 by their present proprietor who occu- 
pies a commodious building 66x200 feet in 
dimensions, half of which is one story and 
half two stories in hight, containing ample 
accommodations- for two hundred head of 
horses at one time. Mr. Jones keeps for livery 
purposes from six to ten fine horses, and a 
large number of stylish carriages, buggies, 
wagons, pha'tons. etc., suitable for business 
purposes or for pleasure trips, and makes a 
specially of I'urnishing accommodations for 
the conveyance of commercial traveleis and 
their sample cases to any point in this or adja- 
cent counties. He also has a large number of 
boarding horses, and the best accommodations 
of any similar stables in the county for caring 
for horses by the day or week, at the most 
reasonable terms. He is t'ully prepared at all 
times to buy, sell, or exchange road, draft, 
saddle and family horses, and to receive the 
same for sale on commission, guaranteeing 
quick sales and prompt returns. Purchasers 
desiring a gooil animal, and at a fair pi"ice. can 
always find opportunities by entrusting their 
orders to Mr. Jones, and all representations 
made by hnn will be found to accord strictly 
with the facts. These are among the most 
complete and extensi\ e stables in the county, 
and patrons of either department will find the 
enterprising proprietor a most genial, accom- 
modating and honorable gentleman, liberal in 



CITY OF SHELBYVILLE. 



113 



his dealings, and one with whom it will be 
advantageous and profitable to establish busi- 
ness relations. Mr. Jones is a native of this 
state, and was born in 1S40. lie enjovsawide 
and inllucntial business acquaintance through- 
out this section of the state. 

J. M. RANDALL & SON, 

Dealers in General Merchandise 
AND Shippers of Produce, Harrison 
AND Jackson Streets. 
So quietly- and unostentatiously has the rep- 
resentative house of J. M. Randall \- Son as- 
sumed its present important prominence in the 
commercial world as shippers of the valuable 
farm and dairv products of this section of our 
prolific state that a truthful exhibit of even a 
iew of their sales in the staples of the farm 
and field will seem like an exaggeration to the 
unreflective mind as well as to number-; of 
those whose business it is to keep pace with 
the commercial progress of the nineteenth cen- 
turv. This old established house was foun<led 
in 1S62 upon a comparativelv small scale un- 
der firm name ol J. B. Randall with a capital 
of only about $500, a portion of which was 
borrowed and the original business was priiici- 
pallv confined to genc-ral merchandizing and a 
loca'l trade. In 1S7.: Mr. J. M. Randall be- 
came sole proprietor and in 1879 the firm name 
and style became as at present, and has been 
retained although Mr. J. .M. Randall's connec- 
tion with the house was severed by his death 
which occurred Jan. iS, 1SS3, "J. M. Randall 
& Son" the old firm name bemg still retained 
with J. B. Randall as general manager assisted 
by his brother J. W. Randall who is executor 
of the estate. The aggregate annual transac- 
tions during the first year did not exceed $2^,- 
000 while for 1883 the sales were more than 
$iiio,ooo, and indications at the present time 
point to a business of more than $125,000 for 
the year i&Si. The stock cairied embraces a 
general line of staple and t'ancy groceries, 
queens and glassware and miscellaneous mer- 
chandise in great variety. A prominent speci- 
alty is made of buying and shipjiing butter, 
eggs, poultry, feathers, furs and hides and 
country produce generally, for any description 
of which the Messrs. Randall is ahvays pre- 
pared to pay the highest selling rates in cash or 
in merchandise at cash prices. In this depart- 
ment of their extensive business 6 wagons are 
kept constantly on the road supplying the 
farming communities with all the nccessarv 
articles of merchandise in exchange for the 
various products of the farm at a par value. 
Illustrative of the maijnitude of this special 
feature of the business it may be slated that in 
the articles of butter, eggs and poultrv this 
house ships annually more than 150,000 lbs, of 
the former, 150,000 dozen eggs and So, 000 lbs. 
of poultry to the large cities, and its trade in 
the item of butter alone to the southern cities 
amouiits to more than :;> 30,000. From these 
items alone some idea mav be gleaned of the 
extent of the bu■.ine^s transacted by this enter- 
prising and representative house which ranks 



among the" leading ones of the state as ship- 
pers of produce and as dealers in general mer- 
chandise among the most important of Eastern 
Indiana. The firm also conducts a branch es- 
tablishment in the eastern portion of the city 
which is a great convenience to the residents 
of that section of our thriving and progressive 
municipality. 



DAVID B. WIL.SON & SON, 

Funeral Directors, Washington St. 
The leading establishment of Shelbvville in 
this line and one possessing exceptionable fa- 
cilities in every department of the profession 
is that ol Messrs. David B. Wilson A: Son 
whose otlices are located on Washington St. 
where an apartment 16x62 feet in size is utili- 
zed for the display of a fine line of metallic, 
cloth-covered, rose-wood and walnut] caskets 
and burial cases and undertakers supplies. 
This place of business is never closed day or 
night and is connected by telephonic commu- 
nication with all parts of the city. This firm 
makes a prominent specialty of embalming by 
the most approved and scientific modern meth- 
ods and this is the only estalilishment in the 
city having facilities for emlialming bodies. 
Messrs. Wilson A: Son are prepared to under- 
take the entire direction and management of 
funeral ceremonies in accordance with the 
wishes of friends of the deceased or with the 
forms and rituids of secret or benevolent soci- 
eties. They have a fine hearse for adults 
which is furnished free of expense, and all the r 
arrangements and facilities are first-class in 
every respect. This firm also conduct a sim- 
ilar establishment in Morristown, .Shelhv Co., 
in connection with the furniture business 
which is tmder the immediate personal super- 
vision of Mr. Thomas D. WiNon the iunior 
member of the firm. Mr. David D. Wilson is 
a native of the State of Ohio, where he was 
born Nov. 27, 1536. He has beena resident of 
Indiana for the past twenty-two years and es- 
tablished his present business in this citv in 
1S7S. 



JOHN B. HARDEBECK, 

Grockkies, etc., SciUTH Harrison .'^t. 
Mr. John B. Hardebeck proprietor of the 
popular grocery and provision store on South 
Harrison St. has been identified with this special 
branch of trade at other locations in this city 
for about four years and opened his establish- 
ment in Dec. 1SS3, filling a long felt want in 
this section of the city. His salesroom which 
is 22x72 teet in dimensions is fitted up in a 
neat and convenient stylt- and hi- admirably 
selected slock is arranged in a most attractive 
manner. The articles are all new, fresh and 
desirable and no old goods or unsaleable stock 
is permitted to occupy a pl.ice on his shelves 
and counters. He carries r,t all times a full- 
and complete assortment of the choicest varie- 
ties 01 staple and fancy groceries, teas, cofiees, 
spices, sugars, syrups, canned goods, provi- 
sions, foreign and domestic fruits, vegi-tables 
in season, farm and dairy produce, and table 



lU 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



culinary supplies such as are usually found in i 
tlie stock of first-cla^^s melropolitan establish- 
ments of ihi> description, lie also makes a 
prominent specialty of choice Havana and do- 
mestic cigars, manufactured tobacco, etc. From 
the very inception of the present house it has 
been accorded a liberal share of pu'ilic patron- 
age and each succeeding month has witnessed 
a gradual but gratifying increase in the amount 
of sales. MrrUardebeck uhois a native of 
the State of Ohio was born in iSS.^, but has 
been a resident of Indiana since childhood. 
He is thorou-hlv conversant with the grocery 
and provision trade in all its departments and 
the management of l)is popular house has been 
characterized bv a spirit of enterprise and Hb- 
eralitv and a policy of fairand liOTiorabledealing 
which has ensured for it the consideration of a 
discriminating public and a position of promi- 
nence among the repre.-entative houses of 
Shelby County. 

J. II. McGUIRE. 

CMiRi.^tii;'-. Dt-<.i,iEs, Wagons, etc., 

East WAsHi.vuroN -STRKti. 
Prominent among the local industries of 
Shelbyville is the carriage manuiactoi-y o( Mr. 
J. H. McGuire on liast Wasiiington St. \ylierc 
in a commodious building 36.>;i-'o feet in di- 
mensions, special altention is devoted to tlie 
manufacluue of tine carriages, buggies, spring 
wagons, sporling wagons and wheeled vehicles 
of every de>crip\ion. An average force of ten 
experienced workmen is employed in the dif- 
ferent departments and from 40 to 60 vehicles 
are manufactured annually winch meet with 
ready sale in this and adjoining counties. The 
best'of material is used in both the iron and 
wood working departments, skilled labor only 
is employed and in the manufacture of carria- 
ges and wagons tlie maximum of strength and 
durability and the mininum ol weight is made 
a promitient feature. Mr. McGuire sells only 
the products of his own shops and is enabled 
to guarantee thorough workmanshipand finish. 
The present factory in this city was established 
in 1S60 and previous to that time Mr. McGuire 
had been engaged in the same branch of indus- 
try at Grer-nsburgh, Decater County lor seven 
years. With a practical experience therefore 
of more than thirty years during which time 
he has become thorouglily familiar with all de- 
partments of the busines-she is prepared to ex- 
ecute all orders for anv de-cription of work m 
his line at the very lowestrates consistent with 
first-class workmanship, reliable material and 
honorable dealing. Mr. McGuire who is a na- 
tive of Virginia was born in 1^35 but came to 
this state when but eight years of age. He is 
a thoroughly practical wagon maker and work- 
er in wood, "and all work turned out at his es- 
tablishment is subjected to his personal exam- 
ination, none being permitted to pass that is in 
any way defective. During his career m this 
city of nearly quarter of a century he has es- 
tablished a reputation for reliability and integ- 
rity which ensures for him a liberal patronage 
from this and adjoining counties. 



G. A. GOODRICH, 

PHOTociRAi'iiER, PuHLic Square. 
Photography, while verging so closely on 
the artistic, is "strictly speaking a purely me- 
chanical art. It requires for its successful 
prosecution good cameras, good lenses, gooii 
plate and paper and good chemicals. With 
these provided and an average degree of me- 
chanical ability a correct and strictly accurate 
picture of an inanimate object or a piece of 
mechanism may be obtained yet fur a pleasing 
and satisfactory likeness with the correct pose 
and right expiession, the services of the artist 
must be called into requisition. For this reason 
a per.son mav be an excellent oj^erator yet his- 
pictures will'lack that essential element which 
is the crowning etlbrt of the artistic photogra- 
pher. Possessing in more than ordinary de- 
gree tlie requisite qualifications of mechanical 
skill and artistic ability Mr. G. A. Goodrich 
the popular piiotograpl'icr of .Slielby\ ille, has 
produced some most admirable specimens of 
this interesting art, and a visit to his reception 
rooms and art galleries over Robins i: Powells 
store on tlie Public Square, will convince the 
most skeptical iliat the pictures there displ.aycd 
will not sutler bv a critical comparison with 
those of the leading inetroiiolitan artists. Mr. 
Goodrich occupies" t()ur linely furnished rooms 
at the above mentioned location on the second 
tloor, easy of access and provided with a strong 
clear light where he is prepared to execute 
pictures in any desired size or style Irom lile 
size to the smallest gems, and to fill orders 
promptly for the tineVt finished work in India 
Ink, cra'von or oil at the most reasonable rates. 
Mr. Goodrich who is a practical photographer 
and operator of more than thirteen years ex- 
perience is a native of this state where he was 
born in 1S54. He established his gallery at its 
present location in iSSi and by strict attention 
to the businesss, the execution of line work 
and keeping fully abreast of the times and the 
progressive spiri't of the age in all the improve- 
ments which have been introduced has estab- 
lished a lucrative tr.ade and an enviable repu- 
tation as a skillful and artistic photographer. 

JAMES MORRISON, JR., 

LivKRY Stable, Jackson Street. 
The livcrv, I'eed and boarding stables on 
Jackson Street now conducted by Mr. James 
Morrison, Jr. were originally established in 
this city in 1S7; bv Mr. R. Doran who was 
succeeded bv the p"resent popular proprietor in 
1S79. The stable which is commodious, well 
ventilated, and neatly kept, is 66x130 tcet in 
dimensions and has ample accommodations lor 
sixty head of horses at one time. In the liv- 
ery department from nine to twelve fine horses 
are constantly kept tor hire with a large num- 
ber of stylish and appropriate buggies, carria- 
ges, pha;tons and sample wagons for pleasure 
or business purposes. Special attention is de- 
voted to furnishing fine rigs I'or commercial 
travelers and special conveyances for sample 
trunks,etc. In the boarding deparlment horses 
and teams are received and properly attended 



CITY OF SllELBYVILLE. 



115 



lo br competent and esperiev.ced grooms and 
hehn'lers Civ Jhe day or weffk at the most reasor.- 
jible terms, two as'iistants b-olng constantly on 
dutv. Pleasure parties Jesjving elegant turn- 
■out's, fast horse^i and stvHsfe vehicles will H:id 
at these stables satisfactory accommodations 
and .liberal treatment, ami conveyances wKl be 
furnished with careful diivers if desired fcy oc- 
casions of festive gathtjrings or funeral ■cere- 
monies. Mr Morrison is a native and li^e-long 
resident of Shelby ville. lie is one of our most 
enlerprisirii; business ir.en and by his liberal 
and honorable methods of conducting; his busi- 
ness, has built up a trade and established a rep- 
utation which entitles his >tables to ti^e liberal 
patronage which have been bestowed upon his 
enterprise by a discriminating public. 

FRECIITLIXG & MORNER, 

Hriis, Bent Ff.i.loes Bowes, evc , 

Hendhicks Stkfet. 
The importance of those industrial enterpri- 
ses oontingent upon and pertaining to the lum- 
ber interests of Sh'/llsy County cannot well be 
over- estimated. Kach new branch of indus- 
try inaugurated in our midst serves not only 
as'nnaiiito tlie development of our natural 
resoLUoes but adds it^ quota to thecommcrci.il 
prosperity and tlirilt of our progresive muni- 
cipality. The now extensive works of Messrs. 
Frechiling A: Morner manulacturers of hubs, 
bent felloes, bowes, sleigh runners and similar 
articles which have acquired a national rep\ita- 
tion for the superior excellence and reliability 
of their ]iroducts were established in this city 
■in iSSi bv Iheir present enterprising proprie- 
tors w ho' appreciating the manilold, natural 
and acquired advantages of Shelbyville, such 
as to an unli\iiiled supply of the best material 
for these special purposes, and its means of in- 
tercommunication rendering it a desirable dis- 
tributing point for their manulactured products 
removed to thi> city I'rom Hamilton, Ohio, 
where thev had been personally a---ociated 
w4th the (inn of Deinzer, Stephen & Co. in a 
similar line of bu-iness. This firm now occu- 
pies a two story fictory building 32XS5 feet in 
dimensions equipped throughout with special 
designs of wood working machinery propelled 
bv one 30 liorse power engine and boiler, and 
two ware houses for storage purposes, one a 
two-story building 24x60 and a one-story 
structure 20x60 feet in size. This is the only 
establishment of its kind in Shelby County, 
and its pr()ducls are ^hipped to the leading 
wheel and carriage tactories and to dealers in 
all the principal cities and manulacturing 
points in the United States, their average an- 
nual transactions ranging I'rom .f 17,000 to $20- 
coo. An aver.ige force of ten experienced 
workmen is employed and the most approved 
designs of labor saving machinery in the ditfer- 
ent departinents of their business. The indi- 
vidual members of the firfn are W. H. Krecht- 
ling and J. E. Morner, both of whom are na- 
tives of Ohio and practically conversant with 
all the details of this special branch of indus- 
try. 



J. H. ENOS, 

Marble and Granite Work, East 

Washington St. 
The only establishment in Shelbvville en- 
gaged in this special department of the me- 
chanic arts is that of Mr. J. H. Enos on the 
north side of East Washington Street where a 
ground space of 50x100 feet is occupied for of- 
fice, work-shop and for storage purposes. An 
admirable display of artistic work is exhibited 
at this location in both the rough and finished 
fortns embracing original designs and repro- 
ductions from the finest sketches of the most 
eminent artists. This representative house 
was established in iSycjhy its present enterpri- 
sing proprietor who now cmploves five assist- 
ants and skilled workmen with facilities for 
the production of any description of imported 
or American grani'.c and marble monuments 
and headstones at prices ranging from $25, 
to $10,000 each. Me also pays special at- 
tention to all kinds of masonry work lor bridge 
building, houses, etc. Mr. Enos has during 
his business career in this city established a 
largo and lucrative trade extending throughout 
this and adjacent counties, and many of the 
finest specimens of monuuientr.l work in the 
cemetries of Eastern Indiana have been erect- 
ed by him. Mr. Enos who is a pr.ietical de- 
signer and stone carver is a native of I'iiiladel- 
phia, Pa., but has resided in Indiana for the 
past thirlv vears. He represents his ward in 
the Citv Government as a member of councils 
and has been for many years prominently iden- 
tified with the grow"th and prosperity of the 
city of his adoption. 

FRANK ROTH, 

DitY Goods, Notions, Carpets, etc., 

South Side Puiinc Sql are. 
In considering the manifold resources and 
advantages of Shelbyville as the commercial 
metropolis of this county, and the business 
houses through whose influence and enterprise 
its present prominence and prosperity has been 
attained it will be found that those engaged in 
the dry goods trade have been perhaps the most 
prominent instrumentalities in diverting to 
this point and retaining the trade trom sur- 
rounding towns and thus promoting the grow th 
and development of our mercantile interests. 
One of the leading hou--es and with possibly a 
single exception the most extensive in this sec- 
tion, engaged in this important branch of trade 
is that of Mr. Frank Roth located on the South 
Side of Public Square, where in a commodious 
two story brick building 29x100 lect in tlimen- 
sions he'orTers to the residents of Shelbyville 
and surrounding towns inducements in the 
special articles of merchandise wh^ch com- 
prise his stock in trade, consisting of a large 
and carefully selected assortment of Foreign 
and .\merican dry goods, dress fabrics, wool- 
ens, domestics, lineTis, white goods, laces, em- 
broideries, hosiery, gloves, corsets, ladies' and 
gentlemen's furnishing goods, notions, fancy 
artxles, carpets, oil cloth, etc. This represen- 
tative house was established in iS79and as ex- 



116 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



hibiting the almost phenomenal success of tlie 
enterpri^^e inaugiirateci at that time it may be 
stated that while tlie lir>t vears transactions did 
not exceed $i,:;,ooo, the sales for the year 1^83 
were considerably more than double that 
amount. The large sales room occupied hj 
Mr. Roth presents a most attractive and truly 
metropolitan appearance and the stock'whicli 
is full and complete in every department has 
been selected with an express view to the re- 
quirements of the better class of trade in this 
section. Three assistants are regularly employ- 
ed in the sales department anil during the busy 
seasons this force is augmented a^ the exigen- 
cies of the occasion require. Mr. Roth who is 
a native of Germany was born in 1S37 but has 
been a resident of this state for nearly aqviarter 
of a century. Previous to embarking in Inisi- 
ness on his own account he liad been for sever- 
al years identified with mercantiie pursuits in 
connection with the dry goods trade with all 
departments of which he is practically conver- 
sant. 

ABELE & ARZKT, 

MiCRCIIANT T.MLOliS, .S. W. CoRNCR 

PfllLIC Squahk. 
Among the representative firms uhich have 
contributed to the promotion of a cultivated 
and refined taste in the matter of fashionable 
attire for gentlemen's wear, none in this sec- 
tion deserve a greater degree of commendation 
than the enterprising firm of Abele & Arzet, 
the artistic merchant tailois of Shelby ville 
■whose popular establishment is located at the 
S. W. Corner of the I'ublic .Square, .where in 
a sales room JOX70 feet in dimension they car- 
ry an admirablv selected stock of seasonable 
and fashionable fabrics for gentlemen's we.ar 
from which patrons may make their selection 
and have their suits and garments made up in 
faultless style at the most reasonable rates. 
This lirm also carries in stock a fi\ie line of the 
latest styles in hats, caps and furnishing goods 
selected with an express view to the require- 
ments of the better class of trade in this sec- 
tion. In the merchant tailoring department 
special attention is paid to the manutacture ot 
fine dress and business suits to order at prices 
ranging from $JO to $45, perfect fits and re- 
liable workmanship being guaranteed in all 
cases. Mr. Abele who is an experienced prac- 
tical cutter and tailor is a native of Wertemberg 
Germany, where he was born in 1S51. Mr. 
Arzet was born in Cincinnati, he is also a 
practical merchant tailor of extended experi- 
ence. 

OSCVR II.VND, 

FuRNiTt'KK, Cor. II.xrrkson- and Hen- 
dricks Streets. 
Special inducements are olTered to newly 
married couples or those about to commence 
housekeeping at the popular new and second 
hand furniture house and house furnishing em- 
porium of Mr. Oscar Hand, cor. Harrison and 
Hendricks Streets, where in a commodious 
two-story frame building 36.\4S feet in dimen- 



sions may be found at all times an excellent 
stock and lull lineot the common and finer va- 
rieties of turniture, parlor and chamber sets, 
kitchen and dining room furniture, tables, 
bureaus, chairs, etc, from the leading facto- 
ries of the Union together with a large and de- 
sirable assortment of second hand furniture as 
good as new or nearly so which is offered at 
greatly reduced rates. He also keeps an im- 
mense line of new and second hand household 
goods including stoves and kitchen utensils, 
crockery and glassware, carpets and general 
household supplies, and is prepared to furnish 
an entire outfit for house-keeping if desired. 
He also makes a specialty of repairing furni- 
ture of every description, renovating, painting, 
varnishing and upholstering in the most thor- 
ough and workmanlike inanner. Mr. H.and 
is a native of Indiana and was born in 1S49. 
He is a thoroughly practical cabinet and furni- 
ture maker and nis present business which 
was established in this city in 1SS2 has under 
his energetic management assumed most grat- 
ifying jiroportions. 

GEO. H. DUNN, 

CooT-s AM) .Shoes, North W. Cor. Plb- 
Lic Squ.\re. 

For more than twenty-one years the name 
of Mr. Geo. H. Dunn has been prominently 
identified with the commercial interests of 
Shelbvville as proprietor of the p<?pular boot 
and shoe hou-e fronting on the Public .Square 
where he still conducts and which m.ay be ap- 
propriately designated as the leading establish- 
ment of its class in our bu.sy and progressive 
inland city. Mr. Dunn occupies at the above 
named location a commodious and substantial 
two-story brick building 15x100 feet in dimen- 
sions carrying in stock a large and admirably 
selected assortment of fine and common boots, 
shoes, slippers and rubbers of his own make 
and tVoin the leading manufactories of the east 
the average valuation ot which will not vary 
materially from $S,ooo. He also makes a 
specialtv of fine custom work and of general 
repairing in all its branches. His trade is de- 
rived not only tVom the city but also from the 
adjacent towns within a radius of twenty miles 
in each direction. Mr. Dunn is a native of the 
Slate of Ohio but has been a resident of Indi- 
ana for nearlv a quarter of a cenlury,the greater 
portion of v.hich time has been devoted to the 
business which now occupies his attention. 
He now occupies the responsible jiosition of 
Township Trustee and is also Vice President 
of the Shelbvville Gas Comptny. He is most 
favor.ably known as one of our most successful 
and honorable merchants and as one of their 
solid influential and public spirited citizens. 
In achieving that material prosperity which 
has been the legitimate fruits of his successful 
business career he lias est.iblished a liigh stan- 
dard of commercial honor from which he has 
never deviated and in the adherence to which 
he has secured the esteem and respect of the 
entire community. 



CITY OF SllELBYVILLE. 



117 



FRANK GLAB, 

Jewelry and Watch MAKiiR, No. 2S 

East Wasmixgton St. 
The jewelry hou^e of Mr. Frank Glab was 
established in thiscity Dec. 25,1879 b_v its pres- 
ent popular proprietor who is a practical watch 
maker and jeweler of more than twelve years 
experience. Mr. Glab occupies a sales room 
J2s!5feet in dimensions at No. 2S E. Wash- 
ington Street where he carries an aJmirablv 
selected slock of American watchc- and clocks. 
gold, silver and ])lated table ware, jeAvelrv, 
spectacles, eye f,'l.\sses and a great variety of 
articles especially adapted to the requirements 
of the trade in this section. He makes apromi- 
iient specialty of fine watch and clock repair- 
ing and is thoroughly familiar with thedelicate 
mechanisTii of the various styles of time pieces 
now in use and in cleaning, regulating and re- 
pairing the same guarantees perfect satisfaction 
in all cases. Ilis trade which is derived from 
the city and surrounding towns within a radius 
of many miles will compare favorably with 
that of any similar establishment in thi-i section 
and each succeeding season witnesses a mark- 
ed and gratifying increase in the amount ol his 
transactions. Mr. Glab is a native and life long 
resident of this state and was born in 1S5S. 
By close a'.temion to his business and a strict 
adherence to the ]iriiiciples of commercial hon- 
er and integrity in the management of his busi- 
ness he has built up an established trade and 
won (or himself an enviable reputation as an 



energetic and reliable merchant.and an expert 
and accomplished jeweler and watch maker. 



In addition to the foregoing, the following 
firms are doing business here; Vance Hunter 
>!c Co., dry goods; C. K. Bryan, grocer; J. C. 
Cheney, Harness; L. Bookwalter, notions; W. 
Elliott. grocer; F. Stephan, bootsand shoes; S. 
Laughlin i*e Co., dry goods; F. Kennedy, hats 
and caps; McCreai Bishop, drugs ; W. Chap- 
man, agricultural machinery; Mrs. J. Levin- 
son, millinery; C. Arinbruster, grocer; C. 
Neighbor, boots and shoes; T. Fortune, con- 
fectioner; J. Joseph, Clothing; J. Cummins, 
undertaker; N. Souder, grocer; J. and K.. Hav- 
mond, drugs; Doble ^: De Prez, hardware; J. 
Horst iV Co., boots and shoes; W. Grover, 
grocer, Gorgas tS; .Strong, hardware; Kenne- 
dy & Brown, tlour mills; Morrison i: Deprez, 
drugs; S. Carson, grocer; Cj. Kirks, insurance; 
Little & Meikel, tailors; W. \'aughan, harness; 
J. Akers A: Co., dry goods; J. Sheik, boots and 
shoes; G. Havmond, grocer; F. Sheldon, jew- 
eler; W. I'arrish, grocer; F. Morst, boots and 
shoes; J. HIggins jeweler; J. Hawkins, grocer; 
M. Joseph, dry goods; D. Niell', jeweler ; Ray 
House, J. Adams; J. Varnoy, grocer; Robins 
A; Powell, booksellers; F. DcWitt, grocer; 
Flaitz .V Maple, cattle dealers; A. Raymond, 
cigars; C. Wood, grocer; F. Flaiz, meats; F. 
Cochran, restaurant; W. Small, confectionery; 
Mrs. C. Dull, millinery. 



MORRISTOWN, 



This town was originally laid out in 
1826 and was surveyeil from the lands of 
Samuel Morrison and Keason Davis, on 
the hill east of its present location. The 
section was heavily timbered and the inci- 
dents of Pioneer life as associated with 
this place are reni(?mbcred by compara- 
tively few. The first buildings in all early 
settlements were constructed here as else- 
where of hewn and unhewn logs and the 
first of these to be erected was by Samu- 
el Morrison previous to the laying out of 
ihe town. The first store was started by 
Kedden A Tole in IS'JT. Several rude 
buildings and some frame .structures were 
erected during this year and the place be- 
gan to assume within the first few years 
considerable importance as a trading sta- 
tion. S. M. and W. P. Cole opened a 
general store about IS.jl and soon after 
xnother was started by Riley & Gallion. 

The first blacksmith shf>p was by John 
Whetzel and the first wagon shop by 
James Phillips. Tlie first school was held 
in what was known as the Union School 
House erected on the laud of Jonathan 
Johnson, the building being erected as 
earl)' as 1824. The first church was erect- 
ed on the same spot, the school building 
being torn do\ni about 1834. It is re- 
membered by many that the Trustees 
closed the door to one denomination which 
caused quite a strife in the settlement. 



Among the early settlers were Polly 
Roherty, Reason Davis, Samuel Morrison, 
Redden A. Tole and John Whetzel. 

The village of Morristown is now the 
leading trading place for this section of 
the county anti also draws largely from 
residents of other counties on account of 
the excellent facilities it enjoys and the 
enterprise of its progressive an<l wide- 
awake business men. It contains a popu- 
lation of from 400 to 500 inhabitants, one 
good graded school, a new and fine Public 
Hall, one Protestant M. E. Church and 
one M. E. Church, with fine business 
buildings and private residences, while 
large amounts of grain and country pro- 
duce are purchased and shijiped to other 
points. There is a Post of the G. A. E. 
and one Lodge of F. A. M. both of wliich 
are in a prosperous condition. The old 
fiat bar railroad, one of the first in the 
state was constructed and passed through 
this place but was subsequently abandon- 
ed, as noticed in other portions of this 
work. Excellent shipping facilities are 
now enjoyed by the C. I. it St. L. Railroad 
which connects this place with all eastern 
and western points. The present post 
master is Mr. J. Y. Shipp, who has held 
the office for the past six ycar.s. 

The following are the leading business 
houses the more important of which are 
noticed in our editorial columns,to which 
reference is especially directed. 



THE NEW YORK STORE, 
W. A. Boni.vE, PRor'R. 
The mai^nifir.ent business block at the cor- 
ner of M.iin and W.-ishington St>., occupied h_v 
the popular "New York Store" of Mr. W. A. 
Boiline, is one of the finest anti most substan- 



tial buildings of its cla^s in the county, an 
ornament to our proi;rL'ssive ami thriving 
village, and a luonunicnt lo the enterprise and 
ability ol its projector and builder. The build- 
ing is a solid and ornainenlal two-slory struc- 
ture with hasemetil, 62x65 feet in dimensions. 



MORRISTOWN. 



119 



The corner room, 20x45 '"^'f- surrounded bv a 
wcll-liglited salesroom in the fiirm of an L, is 
occupied by the New York Store, with a front- 
age on Main St. of 22 feet and a depth of 65 
feet; connecting with the L, 20 feet in width, 
frontini; on Wastiington St., east of the above, 
is another model stnre-room, 20x''i5 t'cet, occu- 
pied as a grocery. The ground floor space of 
1830 feet, together with the basement under 
the whole building being occupied by Mr. Bo- 
dine for the display of a large and carefully 
selected assortment of foreign and American 
dry goods, dress fabrics of the latest styles, 
woolens, domestics, hnens, white goods, house 
furnishing supplies, carpets, oil cloths, rugs, 
matting, window shades, boots, shoes, and 
slippers for ladies' gentlemen's and children's 
wear, ready-made clothing from the leading 
luiinufacturers of the Union, ladies' and gen- 
tlemen's furni-hing goods, hats, caps, notion.s, 
fancy goods, embroideries and every descrip- 
tion of miscellaneous merchandise pertaining 
to the above named ilenartments of trade, 
selected with an express view to the require- 
ments of the better class of trade in Shelby, 
Hancock and Rush Courties. This house 
was origlnallv established in this town by its 
present proprietor on a comparatively small 
scale in September, iSGd, in a smaller building 
on Washington St., which is still owned by 
Mr. Bodine. To meet the requirements of his 
steadily increasing trade, Mr. Bodinein 1SS3 4 
erected the present commodious building, to 
which he removed in Mav, 18S4. and where, 
with increased facilities and a considerably en- 
larged stock in every department, he continues 
to lead rather than to compete with contem- 
poraneous est.-dilishments in this and adjoining 
counties. From a modest commencement, 
Mr. Bodine has bv enterprise, ability and hon- 
orable dealing, established a trade which will 
at the present time aggregate fully $30,000 per 
annum, and whicn, with his present t'acilities 
and advantages, will undoubtedly during the 
present year considerably exceed that amoiiiit. 
The entire second tloor of the building under 
consideration is known as 

MORRISTOWN HALL, 

and is elegantly fitted up and arranged with a 
commodious stage, andis|especially adn]ited lor 
dramatic performances and entertainments. 
Mr. Rodine, who is one of our most prominent 
and influential citizens and business men, is a 
native of Rush County, where he was born in 
1835. During the war of the rebellion he en- 
listed as a private soldier in Co. I, 37lh Reg't. 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Col. Haz;!ard, and 
with that gallant organization served in the 
grand old Army of the Cumberland under 
Generals Mitchell, Buell, Rosencranz, and 
others, until 1S62, when he received an hon- 
orable discharge on account of physical disa- 
bility; and alter recovering his health, he 
commenced his mercantile career as a clerk, 
in which cajiacitv he remained until embark- 
ing in business on his own account as previ- 
ously noted. 



J. W. ROBERTS, 

Stoves, Tin- ware. Etc. 
Prominent among the imrcantile < slablish- 
ments and local industries of Morristown is 
the stove and house-furnishing emjiorium and 
tinware manufactory of Mr. J. \V. Roberts, 
whicii was established by its present enterpris. 
ing proprietor in 1S74 upon a comparatively 
small scale, but which has, since that time, 
steadily enlarged the scope of its operations, 
and increased the volume of its annual trans- 
actions until it will now compare favorably 
with any sitnilar establishment in Shelby 
County. Having recently purchased the 
premises now occujiied, an addition will be 
erected in the near tulure. His stock, which 
is full and complete in every department, em- 
braces a general line of the best makes of cook- 
ing ami heating stoves, hollow ware, queens 
and glass ware, tin, copi'er and -.heet-iron 
ware ol his own manul'acture, and house-fur- 
nishing goods in almost endless vai ieiy. In 
the manufacturing department, in addition to 
the production of tin, copper and sheet-iron 
utensils and ai tides for his own trade; special 
attention is devoted to rooting, spouting, gut- 
tering and general jobbing and repairing in all 
branches of the business. He is prepared to 
purchase at all times for cash or in exchange 
for merchandise at cash prices, old iron, rags, 
brass, copper, rubber, etc., paying the highest 
ruling rates. Mr. Roberts is a native of Shelby 
County, and was born in 1852. He is a thor- 
oughly practical tin-smith, and a skilled 
worker in all kinds of sheet metals, and 
learned his trade at Shelby ville in this county, 
becoming a resident of Morristown at the 
time of starting his present business. 

HANDY BROS., 

Grockrie.s and Provisions. 
In e\ery communitv where the mercantile 
interests are mainly dependent upon the agri- 
cultural element surrounding it for their sup- 
port and patronage it will be found that the 
grocery and provision trade with its appropri- 
ately associated interests occupies the most 
prominent rank among the representative 
commercial houses. As in other places so in 
Morristown, this special department of our 
commercial system numbers among its rep- 
resentatives some of our most enterprising and 
prominent merchants, among whom vve mav 
appropriately mention in this connection. Mr. 
A. C.and Wm. F. Handy the popular proprie- 
tors of the well known grocery house which 
was originally established eight years ago by 
^[r. Joseph V. Shipp who was s\icceeded by 
Messrs. Handy IJro's. in April, 1SS2. The 
premises occupied as sales rooms are 18x40 
feet in dimensions and the stock carried which 
is full, complete and comprehensive in every 
depariment embraces an admirably selected 
assortment of the choicest varieties of staple 
and fancy groceries, table and culinary supplies 
provisions, crockery and glass w are, cigars, to- 
bacco, foreign and domestic fruits, confection- 
ery, notions and miscellaneous merchandise 



120 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



perlniningf to this special branch of trade. The 
Handy Bro's. who are well and lavorably 
known throviwhout this section have by their 
enterprise, ability and honorable methods of 
dealing estal)li-.hed a lucrative and stc;idily in- 
creasing trade .aggregating at the present time 
not less than $15,000 jier annnni and derived 
from .Shelby, Hancock and Rush Counties. 
Both brothers are natives of this state, the .Sr. 
brother, A. C ,was born in Shelby Co. in 1S37, 
\Vm. F. Ilandv was b'^rn in Hancock Co. Ind., 
1S52. Both of them devoted many years to 
agricultin-al pursuits, and possessing good edu- 
cations tliey taught school for several years pre- 
vious to embarking in business. In April, 1SS4 
W. F. the Jr. partner was elected to the office 
of Township Trustee fur a term of two years. 

HUFFMAN ^V GRAHAM, 

Griiceuies and Provi.mo.\'s. 
The grocerv house ot Messrs. Huffman i: 
Graham is one of the latest accessions to the 
mercantile establishments of Morri=town, and 
although established as recently as in April, 
iSS-), by Mr. HulTman, has already secured 
a high rank among its contemporaries on ac- 
count of the admirable selection of merchan- 
dise carried, the uniformly Ion prices at which 
it is offered, and the enterprising and liberal 
management which has characterized it. The 
stock is new, fresh and desirable, and com- 
prises a full assortment of the choicest varie- 
ties of staple and fancy groceries, fine teas, 
roasted and ground coffees, pure spices, 
sugars, syrups, fruits, canned goods, confec- 
tionery, cigars, tobacco, notions, and grocers' 
sundries generally. The sales room, which is 
fitted up in a neat and attractive manner, is 
18x40 feet in dimensions, and in its interior 
arrangements, presents a metropolitan appear- 
ance. The firm has no old stock to "work off," 
and, in selecting goods, special attention is 
paid to purity, freshness andreliabilitv, and no 
inferior articles of any description will know- 
ingly be allowed a place on their shelves or 
counters. Mr. Huffman, wlio is a native and 
life long resident of .Shelby County, was born 
in 1S61. His early years were spent upon a 
farm, and subsequently in saw-milling; where, 
by an unfortunate accident, he lost his right 
hand, May 4th. 1SS3. His partner, Tiiornton 
Graham, was admitted to an interest, July 27, 
1884; he also is a native of Shelby County, 
born in 1S63. Both members are young and 
energetic, well worthy of public patronage. 

J. L. BINFORD, 

General Merchandise. 
This old established and popular house came 
into the possession of the present proprietor in 
1S79. at which time he succeeded Mr. A. J. 
New. The premises occupied are 22x50 feet 
in dimensions, and the stock carried embraces 
a large and complete line of foreign and 
American dry goods, notions, f'urnishing 
goods, ready-iuade clothing, boots, shoes, hats, 
caps, staple and fancy groceries, teas, coffees, 
spices, fruits, canned goods, and miscellaneous 



merchandise of every description pertaining to 
the above named branches of trade. Each de- 
partment is thoroughly slocked and replen- 
istied by frequent arrivals of new goods as 
otten as the stock becomes reduced, so that 
patrons are at all times enabled to make their 
selections from imbroken linesof desirable and 
seasonable merchandise. The trade of this 
house is derived chiefly from .Shelby and Han- 
cock Counties, and the annual transactions 
range from $12,000 to $i5,oa3. Mr. Binford is 
a native of Hancock County, Indiana, and was 
born in 1S45. His early life w.ns spent upon a 
farm, and he commenced his business career 
at Westland, in Hancock County, asanaember 
of the firm of Harold A: 15infbrd, which part- 
nership remained in force for about four vears. 
After being out of active business life for a 
short time, he purchased the present stock and 
stand as above noted, and has built up a large 
and steadily increasing tr.ade. 



JAMES M. TYNER & CO, 

Grain, Lumiier, Coal and Li.me. 
Both on account of the nature and character 
of the commodities handled, the importance of 
the interests involved in its transaclions, and 
the high financial standing of tlie members of 
the firm in commercial circles, both at home 
and abroad, the house of Messrs. J. M. Tvner 
& Co. claims conspicuous recognition among 
the representative mercantile hoiisesofShelbv 
County. Originallv established in 1S6S bv 
Messrs. James M. 'Tyner and W. W. Wood- 
yard under the firm name and style of Wood- 
yard A: Tyner, the business was conducted by 
them for about five years, when Mr. Wood- 
yard retired and Mr. Tyner continued the 
business alone until the formation of the pres- 
ent partnership in iSSi, when W. C. Mauzy of 
Rushville purchased an interest in the busi- 
ness. The ware-house and elevator occupied 
by this firm is situated on the railroad, thus 
affording the amplest lacilities for receiving 
and ship!)ing merchandise of everv description, 
with a storage capacity of 5,000 or 6,000 bush- 
els at one time. A prominent specialty of the 
business is buying and shipping grain of every 
description, and the amount handled during 
1SS3 closely approximated 100,000 bushels. 
Their lumber yards contain at all times a large 
stock of rough and dressed lumber, lath, 
shingles, flooring, siding, doors, sa=h, blinds, 
I and building materials generally pertaining to 
this line, their annual sales aggregating about 
50,000 feet of file various dimensions. From 
fifteen to twenty car loads of the best quality 
of coal, and about ten car loads of lime are also 
disposed of by this firm annuallv, and their 
annual transactions range from $75,000 to 
$ic>o,ooo. They also handle a superior quality 
of drain tile, which they are enabled to otVerto 
the farmers of this and adioining counties at 
factory prices. Mr. James M. Tvner is a native 
of Hancock County, this state, where he was 
born in 1S40. His early life was spent upon a 
farm, and in mercantile pursuits as an assistant 
to his father who was a prominent merchant, 



MORRISTOWN. 



121 



until embarking in his present successful busi- 
ness enterprise. In addition to liis interests in 
this town as a merchant, Mr. Tvner owns a 
fine farm ol about 207 acres, two and one- half 
miles from the village, which is at the present 
time leased to other parties. He is one of our 
most influential and public-spirited citizens, 
and has been for the past four years a member 
of the hoard of township trustees. His partner, 
Mr. \V. C. Mauzy, is prominently identified 
■with the business interests of Rushville, and a 
history of his career, with a brief biographical 
sketch, will be found under Its appropriate 
head in that department of this work devoted 
to Rush County. 

I. N. JOHNSON, 

Carpkntir and Crii.nr.R. 
For more than a tliird of a century, Mr. I. 
N. Johnson, wliose otlice and shoi>s are locate d 
in an alley near Main St., has been identified 
with this special branch of industry, having 
commenced to learn the trade as early as in 
1S50, with Mr. W. W. \Vood_\ard, by whom he 
■was employed for about tliree years, becoming 
an expert and accomplished workman. Alter 
leaving Mr. Woodyard, he removed to Shel- 
byville, where he was employed by Mr. O. D. 
Pedrick for two years, and then embarked in 
business on his own account, and, witli the 
exception of brief periods, durin;; \\hich he 
devoted his attention to cabinet-making, has 
been continuously engage. I in general carpen- 
tering and building. Mr. Johnson is prepared 
to furnish specificaiions and estimates for any 
kind of public or |>rivale buildings, residences, 
business blocks, churches, school houses, etc., 
and to contract for their erection and comple-. 
tion upon the most favorable terms. Mr. 
Johnson is a native and life long resident of 
this county, and was born ,Vugust 31st, iS^S. 
His father, otie of our earl)- pioneers and most 
respected citizens, came to this place in 1824. 
Mr. Johnson has, by industry, aj^plication, 
good workmanship, and a conscientious ful- 
filhnent of all obligations, established a lucra- 
tive and prosperous business throughout both 
town and country. 



S. SALISBURY, M. D., 
I'liv.siciAN AND Surgeon. 
The term "Eclectic," as applied to a special 
school of medicine and surgery, signifies that 
its followers and disciples are bound by no 
narrow or prescribed code, but are free to 
choose or select from the various schools and 
methods that system of treatment which seems 
to them the be^t, and for this reason the 
masses of the people in this enlightejied and 
progressive age are breaking away from the 
superstitions of the past, which have permitted 
patients to die rather than to submit to rational 
treatment simply because it has not been rec- 
ognized by the special school of medicine to 
which the pliysician in charge happens to 
belong. Careful investigation, close study and 
an extensive practice during the past sixteen 
years have convinced Dr. Salisbury that in 



the successful treatment of the various "ills 
which human flesh is heir to," no beaten track 
can be followed safely, and that there are good 
features in all schools of n;edicine, any one ot" 
which he is free to follow, according to the 
dictates of his own conscience and the require- 
ments of the case, according to his own diag- 
nosis. Dr. Salisbury is a native of Clinton 
County, Ohio, where he was born in 1S36. 
His early literary education was acquired at 
Greencastle, Indiana, and his medical educa- 
tion from close and conscientious study and 
thorough investigations. He first commenced 
the practice of his profession in 1S6S. at Free- 
port, Indiana, and has since that time been 
constantly engaged in practice in this vicinity, 
removing his otTice to Morristown in 1S7S. 
Dr. Salisbury is one of our most cultured 
scholars ar.d successful practitioners, and en- 
tered the ministry of the M. E. Church, and 
for several years was an active and influential 
preaclier in the Cincinnati conference. 

M. MYERS & CO., 

Gli.NEKAL MeRCJIANPISE. 

Familiarly knoivn throughout this section 
as the "Trade I'aliice" the model meicantile 
establishment of Morristown now conducted 
by the enterprising firm of Mr. Myers i; Co. 
claims prominent recognition among the lead- 
ing coniniercial enterprises ot Shelby County. 
Established originally by the present senior 
member of the firm more than twenty years 
ago upon a comparatively small capital this 
represenlatative establishment has steadily 
grown in public favor and popular estimation 
until in addition to being the oldest establi-.iied 
business house in town it has become the most 
extensive. In March 1SS3, Mr. Isaac Kauf- 
nian was admitted to an interest in the busi- 
ness and the present firm name and style was 
adopted. The premises occupied for business 
purposes comprise a commodious and conven- 
iently arranged building joxico feet in dimen- 
sion and the stock carried which is full, com- 
plete and comprehensive in every department 
embraces a general iineof P'oreign and .Amer- 
ican dry goods, dre.ss fabrics, woolens, domes- 
tics, white goods, notions, trimmings, ready 
made clothing, ladies' and gentlemen's furnish- 
ing goods, liats, caps, boots and shoes, staple 
and fancy groceries, provisions, cigars, tobacco 
and a great variety of miscellaneous articles 
too numerous to particularize but including al- 
most everything required inordinary walks of 
domestic life in town or country. The trade 
ol this house which is derived principally from 
Morristown and adjacent territory in Shelby 
and Hancock Counties ranges trom $20,000 to 
$25,000 per annum and is steadily increasing 
with each succeeding year. Mr. >iyers is a na- 
tive of Baden, Germany where he was born 
in 1S35. He came to the United States in 1S55 
landing at New York, and was first engaged 
in business at Hamilton, Ohio. He went to 
Cumberland Gap, Ky., in 1S57 in the employ 
of other parties but returned to this place in 
Nov. 1864 at which time his present successtul 



122 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



business was inaugurated. Mr. Myers com- 
menced business with very moderate means 
and mav be said to have been emphatically the 
arcnitect ot" liis oun fortune. With the pro- 
verbial thrift anil industry of his race he has 
accumulated a handsome competency, and 
owns the biiildin-^ occupied by tlie firm, a fine 
town residence and a well stocked I'arm of 56 
acres two miles from the villaije liiii'ts. 



S. W. YOUNGS, 

Livery, Bonrding and Sale Staiu.ks. 
In its relation to the commercial, industrial, 
and social interests of the community the liv- 
ery, boarding and sale slables of Mr. S. W. 
Youngs assumes proportions entitling it to fa- 
vorable recognition in the presi nt review. 
These stables which were ori-^inally establish- 
ed in 1S80 were erected by Mr. .VlDerl Tyner 
and came into the possession of the present 
proprietor in iSSj at wliich time he succeed- 
ed Sir. J.lv. Kemper. 'J"he main building is 40- 
x6o feet in dimensions with an addition 1.3x60 
atVording ample space for the accommodation 
of 15 hordes at onetime. He k--eps constantly 
in stock tor liverv purposes from seven to ten 
fine road and trotting hor—js with a number of 
fine carriages, buggies, phietons. road wagons, 
etc., suitable for pl'jasure excursions or busi- 
ness trips, Mr. Youngs makes a specialty of 
furnishing conveyances for commercial travel- 
ers and their sample cases to points inaccessi- 
ble by rail at the most reasonable rates and 
supplying rigs and teams appropriate for any 
occasion. In the sale^ and boanling depart- 
ments his facilities are not surpassed bv those 
of any similar establishment in the county 
and parties contemplating purchasing or those 
having horses to dispose of will find it to their 
advantage to entrust their interests to Mr. 
Youngs who is a thorough judge of values | 
and conscientious and strictly reliable in all his | 
transactions. Mr. Youngs who is a native i 
and lifelong resident of this county and state ] 
■was born in 1S5;. Mis early lite was spent up- 
on a farm and prior to engaging in his present 
business he devoted his attention principally 
to agricultural pursuits. 

C. T. WILLIAMS, 
Druggist. 
The old established and well-known "Cor 
ner Drug Store" of Morristown now conduct- 
ed by Mr. C. T. Williams was founded about 

fifteen year> ago and under its dilfcrent changes \ 

of administration has alwavs maintained a ! 

high rank and leading position on account of | 

the reliable char.acter of nierchandi-e handled ] 

and the care exercised in the preparation of I 

physicians prescriptions and pharmaceutical i 

compoimds. The present enterprising propri- ; 

etor succeeded Mr. C. H. Dailey.Oct. 10, 1SS2 I 

and under his efiicient management the well i 

earned prestige of the old house has not only j 

been maintained but new vigor has been int'u- ] 

sed into the business which will at the present I 

reach fully $6,000 per annum. The sales room j 

which is 10x60 feet in dimensions is fitted up ' 



in metropolitan style and the stock carried em- 
braces a general line of the purest and freshest 
drugs, medicines and chemicals, all the stand- 
ard proprietary remedies of the (i:iy, paints, 
oils, varnishes, painter's supplies, toilet articles 
and perlumeries, confectionery, fancy goods, 
notions and the various articles embraced un- 
der the comprehensive classification of drug- 
gists sundries. Special attention is devoted to 
the prescription department and the accurate 
preparation of phy-icinn's prescriptions and 
family recipes from the purest and freshest in- 
gredients. Mr. Williams is a native of this 
state and was born in Favette Countv in 1S55. 
He was subsequently engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until jiurchasing his present stand as 
above noted where he has built up a lucrative 
and prosperous trade extending throughout 
Shelbv and Hancock Counties. 



GEO. A. SPURRIER, 

Harnks-s, Saddles, &c. 
This well-known house was established 
many ye.ars ago and in 1873 was owned and 
conducted by Mr. J. M. Dalrymple who was 
succeeded in iSSj hv the present enterprising 
proprietor who occupies fv>r salesroom and 
manufacturing purposes a building iSx^o feet 
in dimensions where he carries at all times a 
good stock and fine assortment of light and 
heavy, single and double hand made harness, 
saddles, bridles, robes, blankets, whips, oils and 
general horse clothing and equipments, turf 
goods and stable supplies. He also makes a 
prominent specialty of luanufacturing every 
description of fine and heavv harness to order 
and of general rapairing and jobbing, carriage 
trimming, etc. His trade is derived principal- 
ly from Shelby, Hancock and Rush Counties 
and his average transactions will range from 
$3,000 to $5,000. Mr. Spurrieris a native and 
lite-long resident of this county and was born 
in 1S55. He received his education in Morris- 
town and learned his trade here becoming an 
expert and thorough workman before embark- 
ing in business on his ow n account. 

J. G. WOLF, M. D., 

Physician and Surgeon. 
Dr. J. G. Wolf one of our most prominent 
citizens and eminent physicians and surgeons 
is a native of the -State of Pennsylvania and 
was born in what was then Himtington, now 
Blair County in 1S23. Alter completing his 
literary education he commenced the study of 
medicine in the spring of 1S46 at Hagerstown 
Wavne Countv, Ind., w here he first commenc- 
ed the practice of his prot'ession. He subse- 
quently entered the Ohio Medical College of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and graduated with high hon- 
ors in the class of 1S49. He also gaduated and 
holds a diploma from the JelVerson Medical 
College of Philadelphia in the spring of 13^7. 
During the war of the rebellion he resjionded 
to the call of Governor Morton Ibr volunteer 
surgeons after the memorable battle of Stone 
River and rendered most eftective and valua- 
ble aid to the Union cause in the field hospitals 



MORRISTOWN. 



123 



for a period of several weeks. In 1S67 he was 
elected Clerk of Shelhv Countv a position 
which he filled with creilit and abilitv until 
1S71 when he returned to Morristown and re- 
sumed his practice in the lollowiiig vear. As 
a thoroughlv educated, accoiupli'^hed and suc- 
cessful ph\'sician aiiJ. suri^oon he ranks de- 
servedly high both with the members of the 
fraternity and with the citizens of this and ad- 
joining towns from which liis patronage is 
principally derivetl. 

HITTLE i: HTDGINS, 
Meat Market. 
This popular market was founded at about 
the time the present Railroad was completed 
to this point by Mr. IIud<jins nearly 20 years 
ago.lhe present partnership was formed in iSSi. 
This firm slaut;hters and prepares their own 
meat and u-e on an average about 12 fine fat 
beeves per month and a proportionate numlier 
of smaller stock. Thev carry at all times the 
choice-t and best varieties of fresh beef, pork, 
Iamb, veal, mutton, etc., and all kind's of salt 



and smoked meats of their own curing, lard of 
their own rendering, sausage and bologna of 
their own manufacture and poultry and game 
in season. Mr. F. P. Hitlle is a native of Ohio 
but has been for many years a resident of this 
town where his father was one of the promi- 
nent merchants until the time of his death 
wliich occurred in 1S7S. Mr. R. H. Hudgins 
is a native of Illinois and was born at Shaw- 
neetown in that state in 1S33. He resided for 
many years in Tennessee and came to this 
state in 1S5S and for nearly twenty years has 
been identified with this special branch of in- 
dustry and trade- 



in addition to those firms already mentioned, 
there are doing business here the following: 
T. Wrennick, drugs: F. Rigelsberger, saw 
mills; J. Hart, general merchandise; J. Smiley, 
boots and shoes; Wilson & Son, undertakers, 
J. Wrennick, grocer; J. Davis, watch maker; 
Morrison 6: Co., meats : Mrs. C. Rodgers, ho- 
tel. ^ 



V/ALDRON, 



This thriving place is situated in Lib- 
erty Township, seven miles south-east of 
Shelbyville, the county seat. It is situa- 
ted on the Cincinnati, Indianapolis St. 
Louis and Chicago Itailroad, giving it ex- 
celleut sliipping facillities for grain and 
stock. The i)lace was organized Jlarcli 
27th, isr)4, and formerly called Stroup- 
ville. Being situated in the middle of a 
rich agricultural district it does a large 
trade in grain and live stock and is the 



trade center for much of the suTrnund- 
ing country. It has a population of about 
400 inhabitants, employs ample educa- 
tional and religious advantages, contains 
a number of well established stores, the 
usual nund)er of professional men, a good 
hotel, etc. In the series of articles on the 
leading business firms Avhich follow, the 
reailer will be able to gather a better idea 
of the importance of this place as a trade 
center. 



ARCHEY i: CAGE, 

lioor .\NU Shoe Deai.krs. 
There is no one of the industrial arts requir- 
ing for its successful iiro-ecution a his/her 
degree of skill than that of tlie boot and shoe 
maker, and few that are of so much importance 
to all cl.isses of the community ; since an ill- 
fitting boot or shoe is not onlv a source of great 
annoyance antl personal inconvenience', but 
frequently productive of corns, buuicns, and 
diseases of the feet,' incurable for life. Making 
a specialty of manufacturing to order the bet- 
ter grades of perfect-fitting boots and shoes 
for ladies', gentlemen's and ciiildren's wear, 
from the best and most serviceable materials, 
and in the latest style and most thorough 
workmanship, the hou-e ot Archev -V Cage 
tender their services to the residents of this and 
adjoining towns. This liouse was established 
by Mr. J. B. Archev, the jiresent senior mem- 
ber, in 1S75. In April, 1SS4, Mr. James Cage 
was adniitted to the business, and the scope ol 
operations enlarged by the addition of a well- 
selected stock of ready-made boots and shoes 
for ladies,' gentlemen's and children's wear. 
Mr. Archey, who is a practical and expert boot 
and shoe maker of many years experience, is 
a native of the State of Virginia, where he was 
born in 1S41. During the civil war, he entered 
the service of the Confederate .Stale-; as a 
member of the ^Sth Regiment \'irginia Infan- 
try' in 1S61, as a private soldier, and partici- 
pated in many of the most important engage- 
ments of that eventf\d period until 1S63. when 
he received an honorable discharge. He has 
been a resident of this township since 1S66, 
and is justly regarded as one of our most 
enterprising business men and public-.spirited 
citizens, and from none does he receive more 
kindly treatment than from those who wore 



the blue during those memorable vears when 
he, in a uniform of gray, supported the stand- 
ards of the Confederacy. Mr. Jas. Cage is a 
native and life-long resident of this state; he 
has been identified with agricultural pursuits 
lor many years. 



J. S. ALLEY, 

Dry G(>ods, Notions, Etc. 
There are tew business houses in any of our 
interior towns which can boast of a more 
steady and gratifying growth, or the manage- 
ment of which have been characterized by a 
greater degree of enterprise and business sa- 
gacity tlmn the representative dry goods house 
of Mr. J. S. Alley of Waldron, which was es- 
tablished by its present popular proprietor as 
recently as in 1SS2, with a capital of $900, and 
which now carries a stock valued at not less 
than $3,000, and transacts an annual business 
closely approximating $10,000. In contradis- 
tinction to some inerchints, who carrv an 
indiscM'iiTiinate assortment embracing a "little 
of everything," Mr. Alley, at the inception of 
his business career, determined to confine his 
attention exclusively to a few special lines of 
goods, and by purchasing only the best and 
most desirable articles in these departments, 
to "lead rather than to compete." With facili- 
ties for procuring his supplies direct from 
iuipiorters, manulacturcrs and first hands, un- 
surpassed by those of any contemporaneous 
estalilisliment even in the large cities, he is 
enabled to ofl'er to the residents of Waldron 
and adioiiiing towns extraordinarv induce- 
ments in toreign and American dry goods, 
dress fabrics, woolens, domestics, white goods, 
boots and shoes for ladies,' gentlemen's and 
children's we.ar, hats, caps, ladies' and gentle- 
men's furnishing goods, notions, small wares,. 



WALDRON. 



125 



■etc, which cannot be readily duplicated in this 
section. Mr. Alley is a native of Franklin 
County, Indiana, and was born in 1S33. He 
has been a resident of Waldron since the 
inauguration of hU present enterprise, and has, 
by his uniform methods of fair and honorable 
dealing, established a lucrative and steadily 
growing trade. During the war of the rebel- 
lion, he entered the service of his country as a 
private in the gallant 6Sth Regiment Indiana 
Volunteer Intanti-y, and with that organiza 
tion participated in its memorable marches, 
campaigns and engagements until 1S65, when 
he received an honorable discharge with the 
rank of sergeant. 



CUMMINS riOU.SE, 

Miss Sarah Cummin.s, Propr. 
The Cummins House which is convenient- 
ly arranged tor hotel purposes is furnished 
throughout witli a special view to the comfort 
and convenience of guests and the table is al- 
ways supplied with the choicest viands includ- 
ing the lu!cur:es of the season as well as the 
substantial served in the most attractive and 
appetizing forms and in the most protuse abun- 
•dance. Mr. Joseph Cummins who tor more 
than two decades presided over this popular 
house was a thoroughly practical and experi- 
enced caterer and hotel proprietor having de- 
voted the greater portion of his life to this 
special business. Previous to establishing this 
hotel he was engaged in the same business at 
Middletowu in tins state, and few men in this 
section enjoyed so wide and inlluential a circle 
of acquaintances or were so universally 
popular as Mr. Cummins. His daughter 
wlio now conducts the business is a native 
of this county, and the experience acquired 
•during the life time of her honored and respect- 
ed parent in her associations with hotel lite en- 
ables her to maintain Iho poinilarity which the 
Cummins House has acquired since its incep- 
tion twenty- tour years ago. 

JEROME SF-VRKS, 

Groceries and Provisions. 
An examination in detail of the various com- 
■mercial enterprises of Shelby Countv, devel- 
opes the tact that for solidity, enterprise and 
business capacity its leading merchants and 
business men compare favorably with those of 
any county in the state. Prominent among 
those who fiave by energv. integrity and indus- 
try established a prosperous trade and an en- 
viable reput.ition \ye may especially mention 
as worthy of more than ordinary consideration 
in this review Mr. Jerome Sparks projirietor ot 
the popular grocery and provision house of 
Waldron, who although ainong our youngest 
merchant^ o^'cupies a prominent rank among 
his contemporaries. Mr. Sparks commenced 
business on his own acrount in this town in 
iSSi upon a comparatively small scale and 
eacli succeeding month since the inauguration 
of his enterprise has witnessed a marked and 
gratifying increase in the volume of his trans- 
actions until at the present time his annual 



sales \vill closely approximate $10,000. His 
sales room which is 24x50 feet in dimensions 
is filled to its utmost storage capacity with an 
admirably selected assortment of the choicest 
varieties of staple and fancy groceries, teas, 
coffees, spices, sugars, soaps, I'ruits, canned 
goods, table and culinary supplies, llour, meal, 
feed and provisions, plain and fancy candies, 
notions and groceries and confectioner's sun- 
dries generally. Mr. Sparks is a native of De- 
catur County, In<l., and was born in 1857. He 
has resided in Waldron since 1871, and from 
1S73 to iSSi served as CKrk in the Post Olfjce. 
In 18S1 he was appointed Post Ma.ster under 
the administration of President Garfield and 
Arthur a position which he has .since retained 
to the entire acceptability of our citizens irres- 
pective of party. 

H. DRUMMOND, 

IJUTCHER AND StOCK DeALER. 

The meat market of Mr. II. Drummond of 
Waldron has been lor more than fifteen years 
a popular institution with the residents of this 
and adjoining towns, as furnishing their regu- 
lar supplies of meat and as an indication of the 
evtent of his business at the present time it 
may be stated that he slaughters annually lor 
lijs. local trade not less than 150 tine fat beeves, 
75 liog"^' '<^" sheep and calves, which he dis- 
poses of from his market and wagons within 
a radius of a few iniies. In addition to this 
business which is quite extensive for the size 
of the place, Mr. Drummond is a prominent 
de der in slock of all descriptions, buying and 
shipping to other points large numbers of cat- 
tle and smaller animals. His sales rooms in 
Waldron i.s 18x2; feet in dimensions and the 
stock carried comprises the choicest cuts and 
best varieties of fresh beef, pork, lamb, veal, 
mutton, etc., all kinds of salt and smoked meats, 
lard of his own rendering and sausage and 
balogna in season of his own manufacture. 
Mr. Drummond is a native of Rush County, 
Ind. where he was born in 1S49. Heisa prac- 
tical butcher and thoroughly conversant with 
the value of stock and with all the details of 
the business. He lias iieen a resident of Wal- 
dron for the past fit'teen years during w hich 
entire period he has beer, identilied \vith this 
special branch of trade. 



DAVID GRUBB, 
Grain Dealer. 
In a financial iJoint of view, the grain busi- 
ness as conducted by Mr. David Grubb, i~ the 
most important of the commercial enterprises 
of 'A'alJron. the amount of corn and wheat 
handled by him annually aggr. gatingin value 
more thrm .$125,003, a most important factor 
in the sum total of our commercial interests. 
This bu-incss was originally established in 
1S5S by Mr. Milton Collin, and ten years later 
Mr. Grabb purchased a half interest, and sub- 
sequently b:jcame >ole pi'oprietor. The build- 
ing occupied lor storage purposes, which was 
destroyed by fire June 20th, 1S84, had a storage 
capacity for $25,000 bushels. Air. Grubb ccn- 



126 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



templates the erection during the present sea- 
son of an elevator building and mill, which 
will considfral)lv increase his l".'cilities, and 
aH'ord ampler opportunities for the prosecution 
of his business upon a more extended scale. 
He is prepared at all times to purchase either 
in large or small quantities the cere.d producls 
of our fertile farms, paying the highest ruling 
rates. He is in constant communication with 
the leading dealers in the important grain 
centres of the Union, and keeps fullv informed 
as to the state of the market, both at home and 
abroad. Mr. Grubb, who is a native of this 
state, was born in Rush County in 1S31, and 
has been a resilient of Waldr^n since iSfi'j. 
Enterprising and energetic in pushing his 
business, thoroughly reliable and honorable in 
all his transactions, he has established in this 
town a business entitling him to a prominent 
rank among the representative operators in 
grain of Eastern Indiana. 

S. P. STROUP, 

Saw and Planinc; Mills. 
The situation of Waldron with special refer- 
ence to its proximity to the lumber producing 
districts of .Shelby County ha.> been instru- 
mental in giving to our little town an impor- 
tance that has in no small degree added to its 
commercial and industrial prosperity. When 
to its natural advantages are added the facili- 
ties enjoyed for manufacturing the products of 
our native forests by means of improved ma- 
chinery controlled by the enterprise of one of 
its prominent citizens it must be admitted that 
Waldron is entitled to prominent consideration 1 



as among the producing and shipping centres 
of this section of the state. The saw and plan- 
ing mills of Mr. S. P. Stroup were erected by 
him in 1S73 but destroyed by tire in 1879 en- 
tailing a loss of $4,000, with his well-known 
energy he soon rebuilt the present mills which 
are 40.\So feet in dimensions with a daily ca- 
p.acity for sawing S,ooo feet of lumber. The 
machinery employed both in the sawing and 
planing departments is of the latest improved 
varieties and is propelled by one 30 horse power 
engine and boiler. Mr. .Stroup manufactures 
every description of hard wood and pine lum- 
ber for the local trade and ships extensively of 
his own products to Cincinnati, Indianaiiolis 
and other points both east and west. The av- 
erage valuation of stock carried in raw materi- 
al and manufactiu-ed lumber is about $7,o(» 
and the amuial transactions will closely approx- 
imate $20,000. Mr. .StroLiji is a nati\ e and life- 
long resident of Shelby County and was born 
in 1S46. He has by his own energy, enterprise 
and business sagacity established a prosperous 
business which redomids not only to his own 
credit but also to tlie thrift and prosptrily of 
his native eoimty which as a lumber producintj 
district is rapidly acquiring a national reputa- 
tion. 



Other firms here are, H.iymond & .Son, 
general merchandise; Powell \' Feaster, dis- 
tillers; R.Washburn, drugs; Vanpelt i\; Ridl- 
ey, -wagon makers; D. Thompson, general 
merchandise; J. M Cain, harness ; Chapman 
& Larimore, drugs. 



MIDDLETOWN 



This place is located in the south-east- 
ern part of Shelby County near the Rush 
County line, and ahout seven and a half 
miles? from Shelbyville, the county seat. 
Tlie place was oriranized in June, 1S19, 
and -while enjoying considerable trade 
considering its size, has not had a very 



rapid growth. "Waldron is the post office 
and nearest town, being located about a 
mile distant on the Cincinnati, Indianap- 
olis, St. Louis and Cl'.icago Railroad. Be- 
low will be found sketches of the more 
important business firms of Middletuwn. 



T. N. DONKELL Jv: SOX, 
Boots axi> Shoks. 
There are few, if aiiv, establishment.^ in this 
section eni;ageil in tlie same line of trade that 
carrv so lartrccrmiplete and comprehensive an 
assortment of tl;e finer and common urades of 
boots and shoes as tliat of Me>--rs. T. N. Don- 
nell .S; Son of Miildletoun which was founded 
by its present enterprising proprietors in 1S79. 
This representative lirm occupies a sales room 
18x40 feet in dimensions, in which is also lo- 
cated the Middlelown PostOirice. and c.nrrv in 
stock a carefully selected line of the bc>t makes 
of boots, shoes, slippers, etc., for ladies'. gentle- 
men's and children's wear embracing' not only 
the finer grades for dress purposes but also the 
heavier varieties suitable for farmers and the 
working classes in all po>ilions of life. The 
average valuation of stock carried is not less 
than $15,000 and tlie annual transactions of 
this house uill exceed $i,ooo. Mr. '1' N. Don- 
nell the senior member of tiie tirm is a native 
of Decatur County this state and was born in 
1S32. His son and business associ.'Ue, Mr. 
James Donnell was born in Rush Countv in 
1S5S. lie is the Post Master of Middletiwn 
at the present time having received his ap- 
pointment .Sept. 14, 1SS3. Deterinined to en- 
large the scope of business operations the firm 
has decided on renoving to Greensburgh, the 
county seat of Decautr Co. where they can 
avail themselves of extended and more com- 
plete facilities f.^r trade. 

NICHOLAS WEINTROUT, 
Boots and Shoes, 
The popular custom boot and shoe house of 
Nicholas Wcintrout, of Middletown, was es- 
tablished in 1S79. ^\'ith a thorough practical 
knowledge of the busi^le^s in all its branches, 
and an extended experience as manufacturer, 
this gentleinan possesses the amplest facilities 
for turning out the best work in this line, and 
guaranteeing to his patrons perfect tits, reliable 
workmanship, elegant styles, first-class ma- 
terial, fine finish, and reasonable prices — 



important items which cannot I'.dl to commend 
his e>tablishinenl to the lavorable considera- 
tion of the better class of custom in Middle- 
towu and adjoining towps. Mr. Nicholas 
Weinlrout was horn in Franklin Countv, 
Indiana, in 1S59. and has resided in this town 
since he «as ten years of age. He is a practi- 
cal and expert boot and shoe maker, and 
devotts his jKTsonal attention to the iroduc- 
lion of first-elas^ custom work, as well as to 
general repairing in all branches. 

ISAAC G. MORRIS, 

De(V Goods, Clothing, Etc. 
As the oldest established business house in 
Middlelo\\n, ante-dating b\" manv vears any 
similar establi-hment in this section, the gen- 
eral store of Mr. Isaac G. Morris claims promi- 
nent recognition among the representative 
commercial enterprises of Shelby Countv. 
Established by its pre-ent popular proprietor 
as early as in 1S49, this house has, t"or more 
than a third of a century, maintained a 'nigh 
rank among its conlempoiaries. and become 
widely known throughout a wide area of adja- 
cent territory, on account of the extent and 
variety of mcrciiandi^e liantlled and the uni- 
formly honorable methods of dealing, which 
have char;u:teri.(ed its transactions during this 
period. Commencmg willi a capital of :? 1,000, 
which was amply adequate for the require- 
ments of those early days, this house has 
steadily grown in popular I'avor, extending the 
scope of its operations imtil it now cariies a 
stock valued at not less than $3,000, and trans- 
acts an annual business of more than $i.',ooo. 
The premises occupied comprise a general 
sales-room 20x60 feet in size, with an addi- 
tional room 14x40 I'eet, and the stock embraces 
a general line of foreign and American dry 
poods, readv-made clothing and furnishing 
goods, hats, caps, boots, shoes, hardware, sta- 
ple and fancy groceries, queens and glassware, 
notions and miscellaneous merchandise in 
great variety, including every article usually 
found in first-class, well regulated establish- 



128 



STATE OF INDIANA. 



ments of this class in our interior towns and 
villages. Mr. Morris, who is a native ot Man- 
chester, Dearborn County, Indiana, was born 
in 18^7, but has been for more than twenty 
^ears a resident of Middletown, and as a suc- 
cessful iiiercliant prominently identified with 



the business interests of this section of the 
stale. 

The otiier more important firms here are T. 
Miller, general merchandise; [. Custer, wagon 
maker; J. Youngnian, groceries. 



FAIRLAND. 



This wilLige was organized in October, 
1852. It is situated in tlie nortli-westeru 
part of the county about six miles from 
Shelbyville the county seat. It lias excel- 
lent railroad facilities being located on 
the Cincinnati, Indianapolis, .St. Louis and 
Chicago at its junction with the Martins- 



ville l)runch. It also has the advantage 
of several turnpikes connecting it with 
distant parts of the county. It has about 
400 inhal)itants and is C(uite a trading 
point for the surrounding territory. The 
principal bu.^iuess firms here and their 
line of ti'ade, are given below. 



J. B. plymatl:. 

Harness, Gro^kkies, etc. 
Mr. J. li. Plymate the present popular Post 
Master of Fairland commenced bu>ines3 in 
this town in 1873 as a manufacturer and dealer 
in harness and the vaiious associated commod- 
ities pertaining to this important branch ol in- 
dustry. In 1879 he added a grocery depart- 
ment to his ori'.,Mnal busmess and in 1877 un- 
der the administration of President H.iyes re- 
ceived the appointment of Post Master of Fair- 
land a position which he has since filled to the 
entire acceptability of his fellow citizens irres- 
pective of party prejudices. The premises oc- 
cupied fur lnislne.-.s purposes and as Post Office 
are 15x50 feet in dimensions and the stock 
carried embraces a ^^eneral line of hand made 
harness, collars, bridles, saddles, robes, blank- 
ets, whips and hor^ieclothiniur generally, house- 
hold supples in the way of staple and fancy 
groceries, line teas and cotlees, sugars, spices, 
canned goods, cigars, tobacco, notions and mis- 
cellaneous merchandise in great variety. Mr. 
PIvmate is a native and life-lnnr; resident of 



this state and was born in Jennings County in 
1S43. He became a resident of th s county 
and township in 1873 and has since Dt-en more 
or less prominently identified with the indus- 
trial, commercial and political interests of Fair- 
land. In 1S76 he was elected Justice of the 
Peace an olfice which he mo^t creditablv filled 
lor one year, at which time he resitjned; and 
he has ever taken an active and intelligent in- 
terest in political atVairs both national, state and 
local. He is a practical saddler and h.-irness 
maker having learned the trade and become an 
expert workman at Sardiijia.Deci'.lur Co. more 
than twentv vears ago. 



There are also doing bu-ir,e^s lure the fol- 
lowing firms; Holmes iS: Co., drug>, etc.; 
Neal A: Reese, boots and shoes; .Smith ..V; 
Bro., general merchandise; Mrs. Culbertson, 
millinery; Mrs. Feary. groceries, etc.; II. 
Smith, general merchar.di~e; W. Stewart, saw 
mills; C. Wright, general merciiandise; Park- 
hurst i: Gephart, general merchandise. 



PUBLIC LlCr^A 



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